Proposed Des Moines Zoning Changes

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TXCyclones

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Little Houses on the Hillside all made of ticky-tacky and all look just the same.

Regardless of the zoning. People care FAR too much about what their neighbors property looks like. Worry about your own property and you will do just fine.
Pretty ironic comment since you seem to be worried about what everybody else is doing.
 

CascadeClone

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Oct 24, 2009
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I dont know, i can see some value in having different styles of homes within a neighborhood. Keeps it from looking too similar.
Agree. Drive thru some of the Skogman-built neighborhoods form the 60s-80s in Cedar Rapids. There are literally like 4 floorplans, all 90% identical, in chunks of 100-200 houses in some places.

Balance is what is called for, but people tend to over-react both ways. I suppose it is hard to codify the 2nd part of "do what you want, within reason".
 
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ArgentCy

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but you aren't a Des Moines resident, are you?

Lucky for you, the law doesn't generally prohibit standing on a soapbox and yelling at someone or something.
Actually it often does now.
 

alarson

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But Beaverdale doesn't have a variety and hasn't for 70 years. So putting a modern-style (or whatever) would definitely qualify as dickish. And you should be worried that you and Argent agree on something.
I think you might have a neighborhood watch meeting to get to.

 
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TXCyclones

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Or what about the next new great style? Frank Lloyd Wright couldn't build a home in Beaverdale now?
Nope, but he could go to another neighborhood and build it. And, FLW would be disgusted that you'd want to ruin the aesthetic of an existing neighborhood.
 

ArgentCy

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Pretty ironic comment since you seem to be worried about what everybody else is doing.
I am worried about what the local government is dictating to the market. I am not worried about how the neighboring cows affect my property value.
 

cyhiphopp

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That's definitely true.

Ultimately without subsidies the newest and shiniest will almost always go to those with the most money. That's capitalism.

The best way to ensure we have affordable housing in 20 years is to be pushing new units online now, that will be affordable housing down the line.

That's our problem in many areas, that that wasnt built. Particularly in downtown areas where there wasnt much growth for awhile, but i also imagine the pipeline of new units grinding to a halt 10 years ago for a few years probably didnt help that either.
True. Most of the brand new homes being built are more expensive, but there's a market for that. People are moving out of the homes they bought 10 years ago and moving farther north into newer/bigger homes. That also opens up good homes for people to move into though.

I bought a house that was built in 97 and we love it. It was reasonably priced but still in decent shape (except for the deck that we had to replace).
Similar scenarios are occurring throughout the suburbs. People who bought decent houses in West Des Moines are moving to newer houses in Waukee and their previous house is generally reasonably priced for someone else.

Low income is a harder issue to tackle, because even without zoning restrictions, not a lot of builders are building houses for under 200K. You are going to end up with an older house if you want a single family home, or you will end up in a town home.
 

ArgentCy

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Nope, but he could go to another neighborhood and build it. And, FLW would be disgusted that you'd want to ruin the aesthetic of an existing neighborhood.
If this is a new architect they wouldn't be able to build because it's not on the "approved" list.
 

TXCyclones

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I am worried about what the local government is dictating to the market. I am not worried about how the neighboring cows affect my property value.
That's a horrible thing to call the neighbor ladies!
 
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mtowncyclone13

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With all the expertise floating around here, I'm wondering if a certain someone doesn't have City Planner on their resume.
I knew at least 3 people on here with a similar title and actual knowledge.

One of the "problems" with DSM is people DO move from West Des Moines to Waukee for a newer house where in a lot of bigger cities that drive would be horrendous so they redevelop older areas. There's little pressure to redevelop in DSM because those people will just drive to Waukee. In the twin cities there are redevelopments all over the cities because building a new development means an hour drive.
 

cyclonesurveyor

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I knew at least 3 people on here with a similar title and actual knowledge.

One of the "problems" with DSM is people DO move from West Des Moines to Waukee for a newer house where in a lot of bigger cities that drive would be horrendous so they redevelop older areas. There's little pressure to redevelop in DSM because those people will just drive to Waukee. In the twin cities there are redevelopments all over the cities because building a new development means an hour drive.
When I was in the Twin Cities - we were always surveying sweet old lake houses / cabins on Minnetonka that were purchased for big money. But we were usually back in a couple months to layout some monstrosity of a new lake house.
 

somecyguy

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When I was in the Twin Cities - we were always surveying sweet old lake houses / cabins on Minnetonka that were purchased for big money. But we were usually back in a couple months to layout some monstrosity of a new lake house.
I lived in Deephaven for a few years as a kid and I occasionally drive through the area when I'm in town. It's crazy how much rebuilding has occurred along the lake over the past 20 years. I have an architect friend in Mound and he says a lot of his work is designing those homes for people.
 
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mtowncyclone13

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That and government regulations. Hard work and a Free Market is all you need. Unfortunately a Free Market is really hard to find anymore.
I'll bite. And I'm certain you won't respond. But here we go: name three items that *you*, in practical reality, were unable to find/do because of a "lack of a free market". Not a hypothetical "I want to shoot an eagle with a grenade launcher" freedom, or "having design standards on roads means my taxes go up" but a product or service you want that's unavailable. And the thing is you don't get to make assumptions based on your options. You need to use concrete examples.

You know who has a free market? Somalia.
 
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