Proposed Des Moines Zoning Changes

  • Fanatics -

    Thank you for your patience today and welcome to the newest version of Cyclone Fanatic!

    Most of the changes we have made are very simple, but will greatly improve your user experience while visiting the website.

    We have upgraded our forum software to speed things up. Our homepage is much cleaner and should be even more mobile friendly than before.

    We appreciate your loyalty and are committed to not only keeping Cyclone Fanatic in tip-top shape, but continuing to build this community for the next decade and beyond.

    We ask that if you are experiences any glitches to let us know in this thread . Will will be diligently working on the site all day.

    Thanks again.

    Chris Williams - Publisher

mtowncyclone13

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Oct 10, 2012
20,102
9,193
113
grundy center
I doubt you can even build one of these houses on a lot of infill lots as they just aren't big enough. They've got so many set back requirements, frontage requirements, and now size requirements that it's likely impossible to actually check all of those requirements.
Whose to say the setback regs aren't changing? Where I grew up developers buy 40-50 wide lots and put up brand new houses all the time. These are all brand new houses.

https://goo.gl/maps/X5yNq3RqjwimBAiy9
 

TXCyclones

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Sep 13, 2011
7,572
5,623
113
TX

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Boxerdaddy

ArgentCy

Well-Known Member
Jan 13, 2010
20,236
11,110
113
Whose to say the setback regs aren't changing? Where I grew up developers buy 40-50 wide lots and put up brand new houses all the time. These are all brand new houses.

https://goo.gl/maps/X5yNq3RqjwimBAiy9
Some of those don't look like they'd be 1800 sf. I suppose anything can be done but you are just doubling or tripling the costs and adding a lot of stairs that most people don't enjoy.
 

alarson

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2006
38,616
28,998
113
Ankeny
If you don't like Des Moines' zoning laws then go to Houston, TX where they literally have none. You'll come to appreciate the city watching out for your investment by having similar homes be built in the neighborhoods; unlike Houston.

https://www.chron.com/news/houston-...rom-Houston-s-lack-of-zoning-laws-9171688.php

My personal favorite:

View attachment 64697
I mean, there's certainly a wide middle ground between overly restrictive zoning laws and absolutely no zoning laws.
 

ArgentCy

Well-Known Member
Jan 13, 2010
20,236
11,110
113
If you don't like Des Moines' zoning laws then go to Houston, TX where they literally have none. You'll come to appreciate the city watching out for your investment by having similar homes be built in the neighborhoods; unlike Houston.

https://www.chron.com/news/houston-...rom-Houston-s-lack-of-zoning-laws-9171688.php

My personal favorite:

View attachment 64697
Houston is a good example. They've done well for themselves and grown to what the 4th largest City in the country. I'll bet the value of that house has done just fine.
 
  • Agree
Reactions: Walden4Prez

cyhiphopp

Well-Known Member
Jan 9, 2009
30,921
10,942
113
Ankeny
Let me play devil's advocate.

Right now the suburbs use DSM proper for their entertainment needs, cultural attractions, etc and those users pay no property tax to DSM as they live in other communities. Those other communities, because they have greenfields, can put in zoning regulations that basically make it so all cheap housing has to go into DSM and their smaller lots sizes, less restrictive storm water code, etc. In essence, the same cities that use DSM for (almost) free can pretty much force DSM to take on the brunt of the affordable housing issue. It's not fair or equitable.

If DSM enacts tougher standards you're probably going to get some of the people who want to live in closer-in neighborhoods but are scared of making the investment because of the low-income housing myths, so they move to Waukee, for example. You may see more high-income people move in and at the same time go on the offensive towards the same cities that are forcing low income residents into DSM. Until West Des Moines/Ankeny/Waukee lower their standards for development it's unfair to criticize Des Moines.

All of the people in this thread should be equally (if not more) upset at the suburbs own zoning which all-but-eliminates low-income housing in those jurisdictions.
There's definitely still low income housing in the suburbs. It might not be new construction, but it's not like all of Ankeny is brand new expensive houses either.
 

TXCyclones

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Sep 13, 2011
7,572
5,623
113
TX
I mean, there's certainly a wide middle ground between overly restrictive zoning laws and absolutely no zoning laws.
Agreed, but if I still owned a home in the Forestdale - Beaverdale area (Waveland/Germania) I'd definitely want a similar style home to be built there versus a modern style or something that doesn't lend to the aesthetic. That's just smart planning.
 

Boxerdaddy

Well-Known Member
Oct 19, 2009
4,049
1,110
113
42
Beaverdale, IA
I can see both sides of this. Seems like there would be a middle ground here somewhere. This to me sounds like one of those things that seems good with possibly good intentions on the surface. You want to preserve those areas that have character, that are draws to the city from the burbs, but I think this will have a bunch of unintended consequences. I'll just sit right here on the fence.
 

alarson

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2006
38,616
28,998
113
Ankeny
Houston is a good example. They've done well for themselves and grown to what the 4th largest City in the country. I'll bet the value of that house has done just fine.
"done well for themselves"

A lot of the reason they took so much of a hit from Harvey was there was poor control of development leading to thousands of homes being built in areas that would get flooded in a hurricane.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/grap...harvey-urban-planning/?utm_term=.3eca54cee5cf
 

alarson

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2006
38,616
28,998
113
Ankeny
Agreed, but if I still owned a home in the Forestdale - Beaverdale area (Waveland/Germania) I'd definitely want a similar style home to be built there versus a modern style or something that doesn't lend to the aesthetic. That's just smart planning.
I dont know, i can see some value in having different styles of homes within a neighborhood. Keeps it from looking too similar.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: TXCyclones

alarson

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2006
38,616
28,998
113
Ankeny
There's definitely still low income housing in the suburbs. It might not be new construction, but it's not like all of Ankeny is brand new expensive houses either.
That's definitely true.

Ultimately without subsidies the newest and shiniest will almost always go to those with the most money. That's capitalism.

The best way to ensure we have affordable housing in 20 years is to be pushing new units online now, that will be affordable housing down the line.

That's our problem in many areas, that that wasnt built. Particularly in downtown areas where there wasnt much growth for awhile, but i also imagine the pipeline of new units grinding to a halt 10 years ago for a few years probably didnt help that either.
 

TXCyclones

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Sep 13, 2011
7,572
5,623
113
TX
I dont know, i can see some value in having different styles of homes within a neighborhood. Keeps it from looking too similar.
Each neighborhood was built in an "era". If you want a different looking house then go to that location. If 99 houses in a neighborhood are quaint Beaverdale-brick, putting #100 in there that's modern looking would be a dickmove.
 

alarson

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2006
38,616
28,998
113
Ankeny
Each neighborhood was built in an "era". If you want a different looking house then go to that location. If 99 houses in a neighborhood are quaint Beaverdale-brick, putting #100 in there that's modern looking would be a dickmove.
I dont see it as a '****' move at all, necessarily. I think a neighborhood that shows a variety of eras can be a pretty neat look itself.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: mtowncyclone13

ArgentCy

Well-Known Member
Jan 13, 2010
20,236
11,110
113
I dont know, i can see some value in having different styles of homes within a neighborhood. Keeps it from looking too similar.
Little Houses on the Hillside all made of ticky-tacky and all look just the same.

Regardless of the zoning. People care FAR too much about what their neighbors property looks like. Worry about your own property and you will do just fine.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: TXCyclones

TXCyclones

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Sep 13, 2011
7,572
5,623
113
TX
I dont see it as a '****' move at all, necessarily. I think a neighborhood that shows a variety of eras can be a pretty neat look itself.
But Beaverdale doesn't have a variety and hasn't for 70 years. So putting a modern-style (or whatever) would definitely qualify as dickish. And you should be worried that you and Argent agree on something.
 
  • Like
Reactions: matclone

matclone

Well-Known Member
Nov 13, 2016
3,960
3,162
113
I debated whether or not to put this into the Cave but I think it should be in the Real Estate Section.

Apparently the City of Des Moines is going full we know best mode. This is absolutely crazy town and would halt new construction in the City. And that they try and couch this as cutting Red Tape is so disingenuous as to be laughable.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but you aren't a Des Moines resident, are you?

Lucky for you, the law doesn't generally prohibit standing on a soapbox and yelling at someone or something.
 

ArgentCy

Well-Known Member
Jan 13, 2010
20,236
11,110
113
Each neighborhood was built in an "era". If you want a different looking house then go to that location. If 99 houses in a neighborhood are quaint Beaverdale-brick, putting #100 in there that's modern looking would be a dickmove.
Or what about the next new great style? Frank Lloyd Wright couldn't build a home in Beaverdale now?