Kylie Feuerbach in transfer portal

SolarGarlic

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I find it interesting that so many keep resorting to the “Bill is an *******” mantra. Watch coaches out there like auriemma or Mulkey. Pat Summit used to terrify me as a spectator. There are lots of coaches that get in the faces of their players. I really can’t think of any that hold their hands and sing Kumbaya to make them feel better in a game. You also don’t know WHY coach might be getting on them. What happened in practice? How many times did they go over something in practice only to have a player blow it in the game?
Nobody is saying Fennelly needs to be fired or isn't a good coach. Or that Feuerbach wasn't worthy of some criticism for freshman mistakes. It's just disappointing that he seems to single out certain players and he only has one style. It doesn't work for everyone, and it's especially disappointing because Feuerbach was a highly rated recruit that showed a lot of potential and grew up dreaming of playing for ISU.

You don't have to sing Kumbaya. You can pull a player off to the side and speak with authority to get a player's attention. Yanking them right away and berating them as they come off the court pushes some players away and keeps them from reaching their potential. Great coaches and leaders understand that push and pull.
 

David394

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Love watching her play. The thing that stands out, as a previous poster said: Her fearlessness. Also agree that some of coach's outbursts at her seemed intended to demean, rather than the desired, "I'm yelling at you because because I want to make you a better player, and because we're seeking perfection (even if we might not get there)." Particularly the outburst when she travelled late in the A&M game, totally not the time to go so negative, even if you're "one of those successful coaches who gets on players." In such a crucial situation, how about a quick wince at the mistake and then some positive instructions/shout out to the team. Did he have to yank her right out then? I guess there's an argument for that. Could have left her in though. It just seems that good things happen when she's on the floor, and often the next trip down the court after a mistake. I wonder if things had been brewing, and that last instance crystallized the situation from her point of view.
 
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kcdc4isu

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Some need to be honest and just admit they will never like coach no matter how he reacts to players making a mistake. I keep seeing comments about how badly Kylie was treated. I watched every game (some two or three times) and don't remember any really bad out bursts. I saw comments made (and since we can not hear what was said) after what I saw as a mistake but many times it seemed like coaching comments of a positive nature. As been said many times players know his style and if you come here you should expect to be coached to do your best.
 

David394

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I'm not sure you always need to hear what was said. I think you can often "see" the tone with which a message is delivered by the body language, although of course the best thing is to hear from people more in the know that are closer to the team.
 

BWRhasnoAC

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Love watching her play. The thing that stands out, as a previous poster said: Her fearlessness. Also agree that some of coach's outbursts at her seemed intended to demean, rather than the desired, "I'm yelling at you because because I want to make you a better player, and because we're seeking perfection (even if we might not get there)." Particularly the outburst when she travelled late in the A&M game, totally not the time to go so negative, even if you're "one of those successful coaches who gets on players." In such a crucial situation, how about a quick wince at the mistake and then some positive instructions/shout out to the team. Did he have to yank her right out then? I guess there's an argument for that. Could have left her in though. It just seems that good things happen when she's on the floor, and often the next trip down the court after a mistake. I wonder if things had been brewing, and that last instance crystallized the situation from her point of view.
I call this Superman syndrome. Where a coach has a bias against a player and they must perform like Superman at all times to maintain their time on the floor. One small mistake and they're done, while the players with different standards can make mistakes and are given time to grow and mature.
 

David394

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I call this Superman syndrome. Where a coach has a bias against a player and they must perform like Superman at all times to maintain their time on the floor. One small mistake and they're done, while the players with different standards can make mistakes and are given time to grow and mature.
Very interesting
 

allfourcy

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I have sat 6 feet from the bench since 1998. Some of what we hear seems almost certainly intended to be mean and demeaning, often causing the women in our section to gasp. I remember an entire time-out spent screaming profanities at a sobbing Kelsey Bolte, who was standing behind the bench while the seated players were ignored.

I also think he has admitted some anger management issues. I have heard that practices are worse.
Yikes...if practices are worse. I've often thought the past few years how I wish CBF was coaching the men's team. I like his sets, many of the plays he gets the girls good shots, out of bounds, etc. Regardless, we've heard this about his style for many years. It really is amazing that he has had the recruiting he has and developed several all-American team members. We know he deeply cares about them but it does come across as crossing the line at times.
 

Clonefan32

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I call this Superman syndrome. Where a coach has a bias against a player and they must perform like Superman at all times to maintain their time on the floor. One small mistake and they're done, while the players with different standards can make mistakes and are given time to grow and mature.
We've talked about it in the context of Feurbach, but how about Rae Johnson? Ryan was great, but she was undoubtedly allowed to play through her mistakes. Rae always got the quickest of quick hooks, just as you've described here.
 

BWRhasnoAC

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Very interesting
Basically my entire varsity career. I wasn't the most athletic or biggest lineman, but I was the best pre snap read on our line, moved from guard to center my senior year to fill the need on the team, had the best weight room attendance on the entire team, did extra work with our former all state center who was on scholarship at ISU, kept my head down, was realistic and worked my ass off. I think the head coach resented that I wasn't as athletically gifted but I was still good enough for the ones. Never got a fair shake.
 

BWRhasnoAC

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We've talked about it in the context of Feurbach, but how about Rae Johnson? Ryan was great, but she was undoubtedly allowed to play through her mistakes. Rae always got the quickest of quick hooks, just as you've described here.
I'm only speculating, no idea on context of those situations.
 

hiltonisheaven

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I personally cringe when coaches lose control like Bill does sometimes, Fran at EIU, and many, many others. If a manager where I worked behaved that way they would be offered training and a chance to fix their behavior but eventually they would be fired for this behavior. Especially if the manager was losing talented employees. Why should coaching be any different?
 

Drew0311

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I call this Superman syndrome. Where a coach has a bias against a player and they must perform like Superman at all times to maintain their time on the floor. One small mistake and they're done, while the players with different standards can make mistakes and are given time to grow and mature.

I thought when McDermott was at Iowa State he treated some players with White Gloves (Brackins) and others he just demolished them. I never understood it.
 
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IcSyU

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I personally cringe when coaches lose control like Bill does sometimes, Fran at EIU, and many, many others. If a manager where I worked behaved that way they would be offered training and a chance to fix their behavior but eventually they would be fired for this behavior. Especially if the manager was losing talented employees. Why should coaching be any different?
Because in reality you deal with a lot more ******** from the person who gets results. If Bill wasn't winning this wouldn't be accepted but since he is he gets a pass.