ISU MBB Twitter

Hayes30

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My issue with Prohm liking all these sets or BLOB plays on twitter was we never saw them translated to the players at Iowa state university. How many breakdowns, hero ball, forced shots did we suffer through last few years? In any career it’s totally fine learning new strategies, but then implement them to your job.
Seems kind of petty to me.
 

cyclonehomer

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Seems kind of petty to me.
I have no doubt that Steve tried. Executing the act of teaching those things (and many others) was a big issue, though, and the reason why he's no longer the HC. I'm sure TJ watches a lot of basketball and is always trying to get better, too.
 
  • Agree
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Halincandenza

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Oct 24, 2018
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I won’t pretend any of this behavior or activity is unique to the new coaching staff, but the important aspect I see of their new social media presence is rebuilding the connection of the fan base to the team. That aspect has been sorely missing since Naz’s last year (Haliburton on an individual basis being the sole exception).

On the court results are tbd, but with a semblance of a personal connection to the new staff and new players, we as a fan base *should* in theory be more positively invested and patient in those results from the jump off.
Also helps with recruiting.
 

Cyientist

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I honestly didn't think there was anything wrong with it. He seen a play or action he liked. No big deal.
I wasn't a big deal, but my first impression when I saw them was that I'd rather have my P6 coach offering up the diagramed plays as a teacher rather than absorbing them as a student. It seemed like something that high school coaches would be liking on Twitter not a Big 12 coach.

I realize that there is nothing wrong with finding gems on Twitter, but just email the link to yourself to bookmark.
 

cyclonehomer

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I enjoy watching Johnson and Hinson just drain 3’s. Now translate that to the game and take open shots instead of forcing bad shots.
Hoping with Hunter being a natural PG and the year after with Lipsey and King we see more open catch and shoot opportunities. Hunter, Lipsey, and King all look capable of getting into the paint and if they keep their heads up, should hopefully give guys like Javan much better looks.
 

Statefan10

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Hinson kind of has an odd stroke - kind of short-arms it. He can shoot it at a D! level though, I'm certain.

Also, if you'd told me that those arms belong to one of Coach Campbell's guys, I'd believe you.
I think a lot of that has to do with the drill they were doing and him being stationary. He gets so much more lift on his regular shot if you watch his highlights at Ole Miss.
 

moores2

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Hinson kind of has an odd stroke - kind of short-arms it. He can shoot it at a D! level though, I'm certain.

Also, if you'd told me that those arms belong to one of Coach Campbell's guys, I'd believe you.
I always thought Javon had a really low release point. Hinson's shot looked smooth to me.
 

MuskieCy

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I was flipping channels and there was White saying goodbye/thank you to Rachel Maddow. Replays at 11:00 PM.
The transcript:

MADDOW: If the history of this era is written, it will be written up as an era of protests and demonstrations, some of the largest in American`s history sparked more than anything else by the death of George Floyd on the Minneapolis street corner last year. His death today resulted in a three guilty verdicts for the officer charged with Mr. Floyd`s death.

For the better part of a year now since Floyd was killed, we have been on again and off again rolling state of protests nationwide and even worldwide. Protests against his killing as far away as Europe and Latin America and the Middle East. But the epicenter was George Floyd was killed by now convicted Officer Derek Chauvin.

One interesting key figure in those protests from the very beginning was a not expected one, a 6`8" 30-year-old pro basketball player, former NBA star and Minnesota native Royce White.

Mr. White`s activism started just after the video surfaced last year of George Floyd`s death. He saw that video, he sent texts to a group of high- profile Minnesota athletes, 30 of them. His own professional players, he told them it is time to get involved with the struggle, quote, enough is enough. Mr. White called on them to attend a march and they made a striking vanguard at that march.

That group of 30 quickly turned into hundreds and ultimately turned into thousands. The first march they marched into the U.S. Banks Stadium where the Minnesota Vikings play, down a major interstate, and over the Mississippi River.

Royce White has been a central figure in the ongoing Minneapolis protests over the death of George Floyd over since. He has recently been protesting in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, after the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright.

Joining us now is activist, former NBA player, Royce White.

Mr. White, it`s a real pleasure to have you with us tonight. Thank you so much for being here on this night of all nights.

ROYCE WHITE, FORMER NBA PLAYER: Thank you for having me.

MADDOW: Just tell me about where you were when you learned about the verdict today and the reaction to the jury`s findings?

WHITE: You know, when my son actually has been home sick from school the last few days, he had upset stomach, and we had to get him a COVID test. So, I was forced to be in the clinic when the verdict came down. But we have some people on the ground there, at the government center, and we`ve been watching this trial with great interests and heavy hearts with George Floyd and his family. We hope today`s verdict gives them some peace and that it serves as some legal precedents as we move forward.

MADDOW: We`ve been watching all night live footage from Minneapolis and specifically from outside the Cup Foods, which is now called George Floyd Square, where Mr. Floyd was killed and where there has been essentially a yearlong vigil there for him, and demanding justice for him.

How do you think that the verdicts will be received overall in Minneapolis? What do you see for your city and for Minnesota given all of the pain and trauma of that case, that killing, that case, and now ongoing other cases of similar police violence that are tearing the communities heart a new?

WHITE: Well, I can`t speak for what will happen. I can speak to what`s should happen. I think the pressure should continue. Obviously, we have talked about the bigger picture often, and since that first march here that you mentioned.

I think the defense of Derek Chauvin did a great job of laying out how the monopoly on violence that the state has is still well intact as far as policy goes. As you read their closing arguments, they made a huge emphasis on how police are trained, and the wording of the dialogue, the language that lies in those policies.

And the monopoly on violence that the state has is still well intact, we have to continue to push back against that tyranny.

MADDOW: What do you think the impact of the protests was in terms of the way that this case was perceived nationwide and the issue of accountability?

WHITE: Well, I think, you know, there was two threats, right? The city was so emotional and so angry that fires broke out, and our protest was to try to respond to the nationwide and global narrative around violent protests with rioting.

But I think, ultimately, the people view America as a corporation, and they view our police departments as corporate assets. And they also feel and believe that the value of a human life is no longer equal to those corporate assets, which is why people gather in those areas and react the way they do.

I think our protesting on the 35W Bridge, despite the semi-truck that, you know, charged on to the bridge, moved on to the bridge, and could`ve hurt citizens, thank God none were hurt, I think it made a bold statement that at the end of the day, we have to be prepared to respond to tyranny in a very dramatic fashion.

MADDOW: Royce White, activist, former NBA player, Minnesota native, Mr. White, thank you for taking time to talk with us tonight. It`s a pleasure to have you here, sir.

WHITE: Thank you, Rachel.

MADDOW: We`ll be right back. Stay with us.
 

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