***General Cycling Thread***

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PineClone

Active Member
Jul 16, 2008
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I haven't read through this whole thread, so maybe someone already suggested this...

- You'll get WAY more bike for your money if you buy used. If i were looking for a mountain bike, i'd only look in the 1-4 year old range. But for a road bike you're good looking for bikes older than that. I ride a 10 year old cyclocross bike and have no intentions of upgrading any time soon.

Go to pinkbike.com, click on the buy/sell tab, you'll find lots of bikes. Look in your local area, but many sellers are willing to ship.
 

Cydkar

Well-Known Member
Apr 12, 2006
24,193
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What's everyone's opinion on riding on 2 lane highways? I live in a really hilly part of Iowa and have had way too many close calls cresting hills with my car. If another car was coming my direction any of those times I would have killed someone.

Feeling unsafe is the reason I won't bike like everyone else in my family. Sorry for the derail.
I absolutely hate it and avoid it at all costs. 1 driver staring at their phone at the wrong time and it's curtains. Hard pass. I'm a pu$$.
 

Tre4ISU

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Almost always it is cheaper/more effective to shed weight from yourself before you start worrying about the weight of your bike.
That's what I'm thinking. That 3 pounds of bike weight is nothing compared to the 50-60 I've got that I don't need.
 

Clonehomer

Well-Known Member
Apr 11, 2006
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What's everyone's opinion on riding on 2 lane highways? I live in a really hilly part of Iowa and have had way too many close calls cresting hills with my car. If another car was coming my direction any of those times I would have killed someone.

Feeling unsafe is the reason I won't bike like everyone else in my family. Sorry for the derail.
I will by myself, but I do usually ride on the left shoulder so I see the cars coming and can get over further. But with the trail systems these days, there isn't much reason to do so. Get a bike rack on the car and drive to a trail.
 

simply1

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I will by myself, but I do usually ride on the left shoulder so I see the cars coming and can get over further. But with the trail systems these days, there isn't much reason to do so. Get a bike rack on the car and drive to a trail.
Salmoning....
 

Gunnerclone

Well-Known Member
Jul 16, 2010
40,137
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DSM
What's everyone's opinion on riding on 2 lane highways? I live in a really hilly part of Iowa and have had way too many close calls cresting hills with my car. If another car was coming my direction any of those times I would have killed someone.

Feeling unsafe is the reason I won't bike like everyone else in my family. Sorry for the derail.
Don’t do it early in the morning when the sun is low or in the evening when the sun is low.
 

Tre4ISU

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Don’t do it early in the morning when the sun is low or in the evening when the sun is low.
Coming from someone who hasn't ridden but is getting into it, I won't be doing it on hills. I probably won't do it much on road anywhere. Also, as a farmer, they are a scary deal in the busy months. It's not the bike, it's the other vehicle in that lane that has to get over and it's just not a great situation.
 

NorthCyd

Well-Known Member
Aug 22, 2011
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Great point. I got the dual pedals when I first got into it and haven't changed them since.
I got the dual pedals. My bike came with straps and I hated them so I upgraded to a dual sided clipless pedal and love it. Of course I fell over a few times getting use to them, which is the ultimate embarrassment. I rarely use the flat side, but it has come in handy occasionally. I bought mountain bike shoes instead of road shoes because I like the recessed cleat so I can walk around in them without the awkward foot angle and "clickity clack".
 

Gonzo

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2009
13,715
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Behind you
I got the dual pedals. My bike came with straps and I hated them so I upgraded to a dual sided clipless pedal and love it. Of course I fell over a few times getting use to them, which is the ultimate embarrassment. I rarely use the flat side, but it has come in handy occasionally. I bought mountain bike shoes instead of road shoes because I like the recessed cleat so I can walk around in them without the awkward foot angle and "clickity clack".
Yep, me too.
 

FarminCy

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Nov 14, 2009
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Nowhere and Everywhere
I haven't read through everything and have no clue what others have recommended but here is my opinion as someone that has been a cyclist since 16 (25 years).

First off buy used. You can find a good bike for half the price of new that most likely is coming from someone no different than yourself. Decided to get into biking, spent a lot of money on getting started, then never got into it and deciding to sell everything. I'm not saying that's what will happen with you but there are a lot of <3 year old bikes out there with almost no miles on them. Don't get hung up on the higest end components for your first bike. I always advise people to have their second bike be the new expensive one, see if you truly enjoy it first, then spend the money later.

Second get an allroad/gravel bike. There are many advantages to them even if you have zero interest in riding gravel. They are just as fast on pavement for the average rider but can handle so many other situations that a road bike can struggle with. Case in point, I ride with a group of friends aroround the Des Moines area that includes a lot of street riding, bike path, down town, neignborhoods, etc. Even when we never leave pavement the folks that are on road bikes encounter situations that are an issue for their bikes while the rest of us roll right through. However newer road bikes will accept 30C tires which is a very versatile size.

Third don't get hung up on weight. I laugh at bikers that brag about they saved 250 grams by swapping out new wheels/etc while they themselves are 20-40 pounds overweight. I primarily ride a steel gravel/adventure bike and have zero issues keeping up with the carbon roadies. Get the bike that fits you and allows you to do what you want instead of falling for all the tech/weight talk some get obsessed with. Frame material and weight can never overcome someone not in cycling shape or a bike not suited for your situation.

Fourth find what clothing works for you. If you want full form fitting kit than go for it. If you would rather wear more "bagger" clothes than go for it. Figure out if clipped or flat pedals work for you and go for it. Everyone has their own comfort, sytle, etc. I personally ride in more "bagger" clothes and my group has all types as we've all found what works for us individually. It will take some experimenting but dont get pressured "that you need this" in regards to clothing.

Fifth prepare your bank account!!! I spend waaaay to much on accessories and tweaking my bikes. But it's worth every penny.
 
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Tre4ISU

Well-Known Member
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Dec 30, 2008
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I haven't read through everything and have no clue what others have recommended but here is my opinion as someone that has been a cyclist since 16 (25 years).

First off buy used. You can find a good bike for half the price of new that most likely is coming from someone no different than yourself. Decided to get into biking, spent a lot of money on getting started, then never got into it and deciding to sell everything. I'm not saying that's what will happen with you but there are a lot of <3 year old bikes out there with almost no miles on them. Don't get hung up on the higest end components for your first bike. I always advise people to have their second bike be the new expensive one, see if you truly enjoy it first, then spend the money later.

Second get an allroad/gravel bike. There are many advantages to them even if you have zero interest in riding gravel. They are just as fast on pavement for the average rider but can handle so many other situations that a road bike can struggle with. Case in point, I ride with a group of friends aroround the Des Moines area that includes a lot of street riding, bike path, down town, neignborhoods, etc. Even when we never leave pavement the folks that are on road bikes encounter situations that are an issue for their bikes while the rest of us roll right through. However newer road bikes will accept 30C tires which is a very versatile size.

Third don't get hung up on weight. I laugh at bikers that brag about they saved 250 grams by swapping out new wheels/etc while they themselves are 20-40 pounds overweight. I primarily ride a steel gravel/adventure bike and have zero issues keeping up with the carbon roadies. Get the bike that fits you and allows you to do what you want instead of falling for all the tech/weight talk some get obsessed with. Frame material and weight can never overcome someone not in cycling shape or a bike not suited for your situation.

Fourth find what clothing works for you. If you want full form fitting kit than go for it. If you would rather wear more "bagger" clothes than go for it. Figure out if clipped or flat pedals work for you and go for it. Everyone has their own comfort, sytle, etc. I personally ride in more "bagger" clothes and my group has all types as we've all found what works for us individually. It will take some experimenting but dont get pressured "that you need this" in regards to clothing.

Fifth prepare your bank account!!! I spend waaaay to much on accessories and tweaking my bikes. But it's worth every penny.
Thanks. I don't think I'll be going used because nothing nearby seems to be available in what I'm looking for. I think I have a line on a new Checkpoint 4 that I'm just trying to talk myself into right now as it's a little more than I hoped to spend but I think it's exactly what I want and won't put me in a spot where I'm taking a beating next year because I tried to save a few hundred bucks.

I have no idea where to start on clothing. I do some indoor biking so I do have some shorts but I have nothing else. I'm just going to have to feel that stuff out. One thing I don't want to do is cheapen myself into hating the hobby so I'm toeing a line here.
 

NorthCyd

Well-Known Member
Aug 22, 2011
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I have no idea where to start on clothing. I do some indoor biking so I do have some shorts but I have nothing else. I'm just going to have to feel that stuff out. One thing I don't want to do is cheapen myself into hating the hobby so I'm toeing a line here.
Regardless of clothing type get a good pair of bike shorts. You can wear baggy shorts over the top or they even make bike shorts that look like regular shorts. I tried going cheap with bike shorts and the padding was low quality and lost its cushioning quickly.
 

Tre4ISU

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The CAADX 105 has entered the chat. From what I've read the cycling community looks VERY favorably on the 105 components vs Tiagra, correct?
 
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cyclonesurveyor

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2009
1,142
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Fort Collins, CO
The CAADX 105 has entered the chat. From what I've read the cycling community looks VERY favorably on the 105 components vs Tiagra, correct?
This is what I ended up with but with SRAM rival which I like the shifting over the 105.

I ended up using the warranty on the original frame and the second also. The bike would howl and vibrate when coming to a stop. Bike shop monkeyed with it and couldn't figure it out. 3rd try they gave me a new carbon frame and I was still having the problem but to a lesser extent.

Buddy and I were having beers after a ride, me ******** about the noise and vibration, and we decided to try and swap out the brake rotors. Boom - the rotors were some cheap off brand, not SRAMs. New rotors and I really enjoy riding my Super X!
 

NWICY

Well-Known Member
Sep 2, 2012
12,606
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I've been doing some paved trail biking in this quarantine (first time in years) and have really been enjoying it. But I'm doing it on a $300 off the shelf bike that I bought a couple of years ago. Can someone really dumb it down for me and explain the benefits of getting a much better bike? And for someone like me that may casually ride 10-20 miles 1-2 times per week, is it worth it?

This thread has been super interesting but WAY over my dumb, non-biking head.
What your doing will work just fine.IMO.
 
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simply1

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105 is much better, 10 and 11 speed easier to upgrade as well if you so choose.