Thanksgiving specialties

Mr Janny

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Agree. I oven roast mine. Brine for two days, lots of compound butter under the skin, higher heat/shorter time, loosely foil after the skin has browned, check temp early and often, let rest minimum 20 mins. It was intimidating the first few years but I've been doing it over a decade now so it's just routine.
Brining is key. There's no better way to add flavor and maintain moisture in the final product.
 

Gonzo

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Brining is key. There's no better way to add flavor and maintain moisture in the final product.
100%. I used to wet brine but switched to dry salt brine last year and like the results as much if not more. Plus don't have to worry about the mess of the wet brine, the extra work of getting it all together/boiled/cooled, worrying about whether it's staying cold enough in the cooler. Just have to get salt on it and into the fridge.
 
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LeaningCy

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This will be my 3rd year smoking one - highly recommend spatch-cocking the bird first. Cooks very evenly and doesn't take as long. Turkey has turned out amazing each time, probably hard to mess up too bad.

Once you spatchcock, you never go back. Turkey done in 80 minutes, crispy skin + perfectly cooked breast and thighs.

Also, invest in poultry shears, they make it so much easier than standard kitchen shears to cut out the backbone.
 

MeanDean

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I also have done a from-scratch slow-cooker stuffing that seemed to get good reviews. But in recent years, I realized boxed works well enough, so I got lazy/lazier.
I'm the king of tweaking boxed stuff. I'd probably use an extra couple tablespoons of butter. Add a chicken boullion cube crushed then some fresh chopped celery, parsley and onion. Gives the illusion of home prepared.
 

brianhos

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Home made stuffing, I only make it once a year and it was my mother in laws recipe, but it's so good.
 

NWICY

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Green bean casserole and a broccoli and grape salad thing that I put together
 

clone4life82

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100%. I used to wet brine but switched to dry salt brine last year and like the results as much if not more. Plus don't have to worry about the mess of the wet brine, the extra work of getting it all together/boiled/cooled, worrying about whether it's staying cold enough in the cooler. Just have to get salt on it and into the fridge.

What’s your dry brine recipe? Use a binder? Just on the skin or under the skin too? I did a dry brine rub with butter last year and it was good but am wondering if a wet brine would be better.
 

August

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Gravy is my thing. Start with a good turkey broth. The day before (Wednesday), boil/simmer the giblets, turkey wing ends and tail in chicken broth, along with some chunks of onions, carrots and celery to make the turkey broth. DO NOT add any salt or pepper to the broth. Strain and store in fridge overnight. Melt 1 tablespoon butter with 1 tablespoon flour for each cup of broth for the rue. Brown the rue and stir in the the broth. Simmer to thicken then stir in the drippings from the turkey. Salt and pepper to taste and serve. A 20 lb. turkey should make about 6 cups of gravy this way. Use any leftover gravy for the turkey pot pies!
 
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CascadeClone

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For years, just helping mom very similar to Sousa.

But last year i made sweet potato cubes, just roasted in the oven with seasoning (nutmeg, cinnamon, brown sugar). They were fantastic, never had sweet potatoes like that before. Making them again this year!
 
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Jeremy

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Stovetop Stuffing (dairy free) - I love it and everybody else hates it so I get it all. Gives me the worst stomach issues but so damn worth it.

I’m lactose intolerant, allergic to dairy, and incredibly picky so what I usually like is what everybody else hates… Stovetop Stuffing, boxed mashed potatoes (can use Lactaid milk and margarine, and to the right dryness for me), jarred gravy, etc.

It’s kind of frustrating because I like to cook and have always been told I’m really good at it, but the four of us like things much simpler and plain than most. So most of any skills I may have go towards the non-holiday meals like brisket, NY strip, BBQ meatloaf, etc.
 

Gonzo

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What’s your dry brine recipe? Use a binder? Just on the skin or under the skin too? I did a dry brine rub with butter last year and it was good but am wondering if a wet brine would be better.
Just straight Morton's coarse kosher salt. No binder. I just pat the bird very dry and rub in the salt all over, then separate the skin from the breast and rub some in between there, and also in the cavity. For a 19# bird I used a little over 2/3 cup of salt. Then into the fridge uncovered for 36-48 hours. I might play around with additional herbs in the brine next year but I made compound butter with rosemary and sage that I'll slice up and put between the skin and breasts before roasting, so should be good.

I did wet brine for several years and was always happy with it, but the dry brine is just as good if not better, and much, much less work.
 

clone4life82

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Just straight Morton's coarse kosher salt. No binder. I just pat the bird very dry and rub in the salt all over, then separate the skin from the breast and rub some in between there, and also in the cavity. For a 19# bird I used a little over 2/3 cup of salt. Then into the fridge uncovered for 36-48 hours. I might play around with additional herbs in the brine next year but I made compound butter with rosemary and sage that I'll slice up and put between the skin and breasts before roasting, so should be good.

I did wet brine for several years and was always happy with it, but the dry brine is just as good if not better, and much, much less work.

Honestly thought the salt in the below video would be a decent poultry dry brine too…

 

Isualum13

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Honestly. The first time pretty sure all they did was cook it on the smoker instead of in the oven. It's a kamado style. As far as I know they ran the same temp they would have in the oven. This was quute awhile ago.

It was so good my cousin went out and bought himself the same Unit for christmas.

Now my brother does the bird and buys local so it doesn't have any additives and does a dry brine for a few days before smoking.
 

coolerifyoudid

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I don't care for turkey, so we'll vary the protein. Duck, prime rib, chicken and beef wellington are all better options imo.
 

NWICY

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As long as raisins are not involved I’m ok with that.

That was the original recipe then I modified dropped the raisins added grapes it bumped it up from ok to really good. Broccoli, grapes, cheese, sunflower seeds, bacon, then a mayo vinegar dressing It's pretty easy just takes some prep time.
 
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