***Scottie Scheffler Arrest Thread***

3TrueFans

Just a Happily Married Man
Sep 10, 2009
60,474
55,450
113
44
Ames
Does that still apply to celebrities/athletes who probably get hounded by randos basically all the time? He directly stated he couldn't tell it was a cop yelling at him. That may be his fault overall, but it's understandable given the circumstances of him already being told what to do, and just trying to move...what, a block in total at this point? Not even a block?

It doesn't help that the video shows the cop coming from the side/behind the car, too. It's not like he jumped out in front of him and flashed a badge. It was someone yelling at him outside of his periphery.
Scottie said he thought it was security, so yeah it applies in that situation too.
 

NorthCyd

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Aug 22, 2011
17,946
28,488
113
He didn’t “plow through”. He drove very slowly around. A cop previously told him to proceed. So he was following police orders…….before another cop decided he wanted him to follow “his” orders…….which disagreed with the first cop’s orders. Which is when the second cop overreacted in that chaotic situation. Bottom line, after looking at this cop’s record, he should be fired
He didn't stop by his own admission even after hearing someone yelling at him to stop. If you want to say the cop should be fired fine. He should definitely not have tried to reach in and practically assault Scottie. I would have stopped in that situation if I had heard someone say it out of an abundance of caution to see what's going on and I think Scottie should have too. That's my opinion.
 

cycloneworld

Facebook Knows All
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Mar 20, 2006
28,192
17,390
113
Urbandale, IA
The incident was a big misunderstanding. No big deal.

EXCEPT that the cops initially charged him with a felony and lied and/or greatly exaggerated in the official police report to justify the charges. That should be the story here. Someone without Scottie’s money, eyewitnesses, and media attention probably gets convicted of this and has to deal with a felony on their record for the rest of their lives. Police accountability, or lack thereof, is the issue here.
 

BoomerClone

Well-Known Member
Oct 27, 2010
922
784
93
North Carolina
The incident was a big misunderstanding. No big deal.

EXCEPT that the cops initially charged him with a felony and lied and/or greatly exaggerated in the official police report to justify the charges. That should be the story here. Someone without Scottie’s money, eyewitnesses, and media attention probably gets convicted of this and has to deal with a felony on their record for the rest of their lives. Police accountability, or lack thereof, is the issue here.
I doubt anyone would have ever been convicted of this but it would have cost a common joe thousands of dollars in attorney fees and countless hours in court before the charges were dropped after many months or years.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cycloneworld

alarson

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Mar 15, 2006
54,951
64,169
113
Ankeny
Cops also supercede a gate security person, I even understand that line of thinking.

Yeah, anyone who has worked at a large event doing traffic\parking (or on the other end has been involved with people needing to get in to special access areas) knows a lot of the people there as 'security' are just there to be warm bodies. The police should, in general, be more advanced in the heirarchy of things and be more rapidly informed.

It would be an easy assumption to make on an event participant's part, especially a VIP, that the first cop knew where he was supposed to go and the 'security guard' was ill-informed and the guard gets ignored. (under the theory security can go get the police who will tell them what's up)
 

TitanClone

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Dec 21, 2008
2,653
1,779
113
I doubt anyone would have ever been convicted of this but it would have cost a common joe thousands of dollars in attorney fees and countless hours in court before the charges were dropped after many months or years.
And potentially a job depending on their vocation. But agree the most likely scenario for an average joe is dropped felony charges and a ticket with a fine plus the legal fees.
 

Letterkenny

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Oct 26, 2023
619
1,200
93
The Louisville PD is breathing a HUGE sigh of relief today. Someone not as nice, and as rich, as Scottie could have gotten a lot of money out of this.
Could they have though? I think the cop screwed up and completely overreacted. But doesn't there have to be some "damages" for their to be a legit lawsuit? I don't Scottie or his reputation will be hurt by this. If anything, he's probably more well liked now.
 

alarson

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Mar 15, 2006
54,951
64,169
113
Ankeny
Could they have though? I think the cop screwed up and completely overreacted. But doesn't there have to be some "damages" for their to be a legit lawsuit? I don't Scottie or his reputation will be hurt by this. If anything, he's probably more well liked now.

If nothing else there's reputational damage to someone incurred by arresting them publicly, and charging them with a bogus felony, and seems like a good amount of defamation going on in that police report that was full of lies.

And when high level athletes are (like most celebrities) brands unto themselves, that reputational damage does have a significant financial value.
 

Stormin

Well-Known Member
Apr 11, 2006
44,716
13,119
113
He didn't stop by his own admission even after hearing someone yelling at him to stop. If you want to say the cop should be fired fine. He should definitely not have tried to reach in and practically assault Scottie. I would have stopped in that situation if I had heard someone say it out of an abundance of caution to see what's going on and I think Scottie should have too. That's my opinion.

Scottie told the cop with the holdup in traffic he was running late to arrive for his tee time. Kind of an important detail and Scottie is driving an Official Vehicle with markings signifying he is a PGA golfer.

At some point we need cops with discretion and good judgement as well as not showing excessive anger and aggression. This cop’s history shows the problem really wasn’t Scottie. It was the cop with a really long record of bad behavior and poor policing.
 

Gunnerclone

Well-Known Member
Jul 16, 2010
70,533
70,807
113
DSM
I’ve said Scottie should have stopped, and Scottie admitted that. They could have given him that ass chewing and let him go and then it’s done.

The cops decided to take that “confession” (which wasn’t even really a confession other than he admitted he didn’t stop when told to, which we all knew) and turned it into 4 charges including a felony. All because the cop maybe had a boo boo on his knee (which the public hasn’t seen yet).

No doubt Louisville PD released this audio the same day they dropped the charges intentionally. They knew they couldn’t get a conviction, but releasing his confession was as much of a win as they could get.

I keep seeing this line as well. What’s the deal with the fantasy about cops “chewing ass”? How about they just talk like adults?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tailg8er

2122

Well-Known Member
Mar 21, 2021
1,122
1,381
113
62
Cop belongs in a new line of work.
Scottie should hire him as his new caddie.
 

Cyclonepride

Thought Police
Staff member
Apr 11, 2006
97,144
58,660
113
54
A pineapple under the sea
www.oldschoolradical.com

BWRhasnoAC

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Apr 10, 2013
26,227
23,248
113
Dez Moy Nez
Lots of cops power trip. Like a lot. They also have a huge advantage cause they're writing the report. Many will hide details or add things to cover their own ass.