***General Cycling Thread***

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Yaz

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Jun 29, 2018
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I've never ridden gravel, but man there are some things that jump out at me as not being so great. Maybe not as much road traffic, but when a vehicle goes bye aren't you eating dust? Also, it would terrify me going on a hill knowing that whatever vehicle on the other side of the hill that may be coming can't see me. Some people drive like maniacs on gravel roads and they are not as wide as paved roads.
I'm not trying to convince anyone on gravel. I'm glad the OP is considering cycling and I am glad to give him some insight based on my own experience. From my miles, the most dangerous group are the bar hoppers and rookies on the trail(edit: tri-riders)), but, to each his own. There is a whole world out there on gravel that most people dont realize is happening and it is incredible so I just want to share that. Just get on your bike and have fun and be safe. Cycling is great, regardless of your flavor. Rural hard top is nice too.
 
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NorthCyd

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Aug 22, 2011
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I'm not trying to convince anyone on gravel. I'm glad the OP is considering cycling and I am glad to give him some insight based on my own experience. From my miles, the most dangerous group are the bar hoppers and rookies on the trail(edit: tri-riders)), but, to each his own. There is a whole world out there on gravel that most people dont realize is happening and it is incredible so I just want to share that. Just get on your bike and have fun and be safe. Cycling is great, regardless of your flavor. Rural hard top is nice too.
I agree a busy trail has its own hazards. I try to avoid the peak hours.
 

simply1

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I'm not trying to convince anyone on gravel. I'm glad the OP is considering cycling and I am glad to give him some insight based on my own experience. From my miles, the most dangerous group are the bar hoppers and rookies on the trail(edit: tri-riders)), but, to each his own. There is a whole world out there on gravel that most people dont realize is happening and it is incredible so I just want to share that. Just get on your bike and have fun and be safe. Cycling is great, regardless of your flavor. Rural hard top is nice too.
Opportunity also varies greatly by state
https://buckyrides.com/burger-lodge-loop/
 

Gonzo

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Mar 10, 2009
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Behind you
Don't buy anything without riding it first. Don't feel the need to go full-on carbon frame. Finding a good bike shop is great, but the people you'll talk to often are hard core riders who many times only want to talk about the newest and best technology. As a beginner you'd be just fine with an aluminum frame/carbon forks.

I have a FELT and love it.
 
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brett108

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May 1, 2010
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Tulsa, OK
I don’t know what it’s like in Iowa but in Tulsa OK every bicycle under $1500 has been snatched up. I think a lot of stimulus money filled that market and people are getting out and about. I have seen no bicycles of intermediate quality, stand up pools, or Nintendo Switches for a while.
 

lionnusmb

Active Member
Dec 30, 2008
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Ankeny, IA
Do not go used unless you plan on spending less than $600 on a bike. The warranty on a new bike is worth buying new. The warranty does not transfer to secondhand owners.

Before I got into cycling I had purchased a new Gary fisher. About a year after I started hearing a clicking sound. Come to find out there was a crack somewhere in the frame. It was replaced free of charge. Well worth it. Also, carbon frames have a lifespan. Purchasing used cannot be done lightly.
 

ILikeTurtles

Active Member
Oct 15, 2011
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Unless you just have extra money to burn, I'd get a used bike since you don't know whether you're even going to stay with the hobby. If you use it for the season and want to upgrade, you could resell it for probably almost how much you paid for it. Buy a new $1500 bike and you want to sell it next spring and you're out over $600.

For less than $1000 you can get a pretty nice name brand, aluminum frame bike with shimano 105 components. Check out the groups "midwest velo swap" and "mid west velo swap" on facebook. Just do some research on what size you probably ride and take it for a test ride before you buy.
 
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michaelrr1

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Mar 30, 2006
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5 years ago I got a hybrid Trek 7.2 for about $600. I compared it with others that were next level up, but test riding in a parking lot, I couldn't tell any difference. I mainly am riding on trails. I wonder how much of a difference would an upgrade make as far as being able to go faster and thus ride farther in the same amount of time I spend riding now. Sometimes there will be other riders that just blow right past me.
 

NorthCyd

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Aug 22, 2011
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5 years ago I got a hybrid Trek 7.2 for about $600. I compared it with others that were next level up, but test riding in a parking lot, I couldn't tell any difference. I mainly am riding on trails. I wonder how much of a difference would an upgrade make as far as being able to go faster and thus ride farther in the same amount of time I spend riding now. Sometimes there will be other riders that just blow right past me.
When I started biking I purchased a Giant hybrid in a similar price range to ride bike trails for excercise. I loved it, so the next summer I decided to try out a mid range road bike. It felt like going from a sedan to a sports car. Huge difference. My avg speed on my rides jumped over 3 mph immediately.
 
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HardcoreClone

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Jul 28, 2006
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I live in DSM and looking at getting into riding as well. I know someone already mentioned Kyle's Bikes in Ankeny. Any other good local places you recommend around here who can educate and help me find a quality bike?
 

madguy30

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Nov 15, 2011
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Good thread...lots of good information. I just have an older Trek 400 road bike that I found in the parking garage of my apartment building several years ago (landlords let me have it) that I got basically restored and it works great but at times I think of upgrading.
 

Gonzo

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Mar 10, 2009
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Behind you
I live in DSM and looking at getting into riding as well. I know someone already mentioned Kyle's Bikes in Ankeny. Any other good local places you recommend around here who can educate and help me find a quality bike?
Rasmussen on Grand in WDM.
 

NorthCyd

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Aug 22, 2011
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I live in DSM and looking at getting into riding as well. I know someone already mentioned Kyle's Bikes in Ankeny. Any other good local places you recommend around here who can educate and help me find a quality bike?
Rasmussen in Altoona as well. The two Rasmussen shops are not directly affiliated and carry different brands of bikes.
 

Clonehomer

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Apr 11, 2006
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Find out who you'd be riding with. If they're aggressive and want to ride fast, then look for a road bike. If you just want to put on some miles at a reasonable rate, socialize, and stay comfortable, look at a hybrid. I have an old Cannondale hybrid that I keep around for rides with the kids and party rides, but I have a specialized diverge for rides by myself that I just want to focus on riding.

If you go the hybrid route, staying under $1500 is easy. The road bike is a little trickier, but it can be done.

As far as features, disc brakes are nice but to go full hydraulic disc requires a little more maintenance than the mechanical disc.

Cannondale has a nice feature with built in sensors that you can sync with your phone to track speed and miles and the like. Saves having to buy a separate system. I'd assume that other manufacturers do this as well, but I've only been looking at the Cannondales as I'm looking at replacing my old one.

And you can definitely spend a lot of extra money to drop a little weight on a bike. Unless you're really competitive, it doesn't matter nearly as much as how comfortable you feel on it.
 

JP4CY

I LOVE LAMP
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Dec 19, 2008
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Testifying
I live in DSM and looking at getting into riding as well. I know someone already mentioned Kyle's Bikes in Ankeny. Any other good local places you recommend around here who can educate and help me find a quality bike?
I like Kyle the most out of any bike guy out there. He's a great guy.
That said, I do like Bike World for selection.
 

simply1

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5 years ago I got a hybrid Trek 7.2 for about $600. I compared it with others that were next level up, but test riding in a parking lot, I couldn't tell any difference. I mainly am riding on trails. I wonder how much of a difference would an upgrade make as far as being able to go faster and thus ride farther in the same amount of time I spend riding now. Sometimes there will be other riders that just blow right past me.
You'd gain a lot depending on how aero you can get. Just dropping a little bit of wind resistance can greatly improve efficiency.
 

NorthCyd

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Aug 22, 2011
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You'd gain a lot depending on how aero you can get. Just dropping a little bit of wind resistance can greatly improve efficiency.
The fit and drop handles on a road bike definitely put you in a more aggressive and aerodynamic posture. But the biggest difference IMO is the tires. Hybrid tires are wider with some light tread while road bike tires are slimmer with no tread and take a higher tire pressure. It feels like I'm riding through sand when I hop on my hybrid after riding my road bike.
 
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simply1

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The fit and drop handles on a road bike definitely put you in a more aggressive and aerodynamic posture. But the biggest difference IMO is the tires. Hybrid tires are wider with some light tread while road bike tires are slimmer with no tread and take a higher tire pressure. It feels like I'm riding through sand when I hop on my hybrid after riding my road bike.
Yeah that's true as well, 110 psi versus 45 or so. And less friction on the road surface area.
 

CtownCyclone

Loves a rainy night
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Jan 20, 2010
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Where they love the governor
This thread makes my bike heart hurt. I've got a full carbon Kestrel hanging in the garage that hasn't been ridden in almost 4 years.

My wife had a decent Specialized that I bought for her birthday 6 years ago that she has ridden twice.


She's done an Ironman, and I've done century rides. Kids kill your free time.
 

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