RIP Meat Loaf

Gunnerclone

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Without the 80s you don't have the 90s.

The 80’s were an insanely good music decade. Music shouldn’t be typecast to black people go Doo Wop and white people go strum strum strum. The 80’s broke us out of that boredom that the Beatles foisted upon us.
 
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cycloner29

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For some odd reason....this kinda popped in my head with the passing of Meat Loaf.

hfZr8vQ.gif
 

Cydkar

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Old people are ******* dying? UGGGGHHHH 2022 JUST STOP ALREADY.

I hate generic repetitive comedy.

Is there a template for this kind of thing? Why does everyone have to say it?

Betty White was almost 100 WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT TO US <insert year>!!!!

I can’t believe a guy named Meatloaf would be dead at age 74! You’re off to a real hot start <insert year>.

like did no one famous die in 2021? Has anyone done the stats on celebrity deaths so far in 2022? Are we on some kind of record pace?
******* weirdo
 

madguy30

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The 80’s were an insanely good music decade. Music shouldn’t be typecast to black people go Doo Wop and white people go strum strum strum. The 80’s broke us out of that boredom that the Beatles foisted upon us.

I think many think of some dude with a weird haircut playing the keytar and it just simply goes deeper than that.
 
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HFCS

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I think many think of some dude with a weird haircut playing the keytar and it just simply goes deeper than that.

I think the 80s started the trend I’m talking about where the best rock and r&b was more likely not to chart. Most of the best rock charted in the 60s and early 70s with a few exceptions.

*this debate isn’t really about meatloaf though. It’s not like Meatloaf was The Velvet Underground (underground genius) or Prince (popular genius) or something. He was pop rock, probably above average pop rock.
 

Sigmapolis

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Pick a random week of Top 40 from the 70's, 80's and 90's and you might be surprised at how bad most of the stuff on the charts was. Top 40 has always been mainly crap.

My favorite anecdote to prove this is the #1 end-of-year single for 1969 was...

"Sugar Sugar" by the Archies

That is, a bubblegum pop jingle "played" by a cartoon band.

Not the Beatles. Not the Rolling Stones. Not CCR. No Motown or Sly and the Family Stone. Not Stevie Wonder. No Clapton or Beck or Zeppelin other guitar heroes. Not the Who, not the Doors, I could go on.

The ******* Archies.

Our collective musical taste has always been abhorent.
 

Mr Janny

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My favorite anecdote to prove this is the #1 end-of-year single for 1969 was...

"Sugar Sugar" by the Archies

That is, a bubblegum pop jingle "played" by a cartoon band.

Not the Beatles. Not the Rolling Stones. Not CCR. No Motown or Sly and the Family Stone. Not Stevie Wonder. No Clapton or Beck or Zeppelin other guitar heroes. Not the Who, not the Doors, I could go on.

The ******* Archies.

Our collective musical taste has always been abhorent.
Well put. Historically, music that hits the top of the charts and what people generally consider "good music" of the era, are traditionally two circles on a Venn diagram that have a pretty limited overlap.
 
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CyberJJJ

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I was at ISU undergrad 82-86, then grad school 89-91, and can't remember a party that didn't play Paradise by the Dashboard Lights. It was part of the experience of those years, as was Pink Floyd, Queen, Air Supply (Have you ever seen those three groups put in one sentence together?!)

While at ISU, some of the memorable concerts were ZZ Top and Billy Joel. The latter was snowed in so asked if the crowd minded if they just stuck around and played longer - fantastic concert.
 
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KnappShack

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I was at ISU undergrad 82-86, and can't remember a party that didn't play Paradise by the Dashboard Lights. It was part of the experience of those years, as was Pink Floyd, Queen, Air Supply (Have you ever seen those three groups put in one sentence together?!)

Air Supply, Meat Loaf, and Bonnie Tyler are all cut from the same cloth.

(Air Supply rocks in concert. Seriously)
 

Cyforce

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Saw Loaf live in the NW Mo. St gymnasium (1989 or 90, no seating just 1000 or so SRO, he was a bit rough but still the best time I've ever had at a concert.
 

HFCS

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My favorite anecdote to prove this is the #1 end-of-year single for 1969 was...

"Sugar Sugar" by the Archies

That is, a bubblegum pop jingle "played" by a cartoon band.

Not the Beatles. Not the Rolling Stones. Not CCR. No Motown or Sly and the Family Stone. Not Stevie Wonder. No Clapton or Beck or Zeppelin other guitar heroes. Not the Who, not the Doors, I could go on.

The ******* Archies.

Our collective musical taste has always been abhorent.

I'd argue today is more like if the Beatles and Stones and Stevie Wonder never cracked the charts or topped out at #20. You picked one week and ignored that 3 of the acts you selected (Beatles/Stones/Stevie Wonder) are some of the highest charting in history on the pop charts.

Beatles/Stones/Stevie Wonder you mentioned had 36 #1s on US pop charts ignoring the countless dozens (100+) of other top 40 hits. Not rock or R&B charts, top 40 charts.

Sly & Family Stone and Zeppelin are good examples though where they didn't chart well on pop charts but obviously objectively great music.

There have always been bad #1s and bad top 10s, but I'd argue with each passing decade good music is less likely to find the pop charts. It started in the 70s with progressive album rock and continued into the 80s with a lot of great punk/new wave rock being more underground. I don't follow a ton of new music but my best friend is a musician in LA and my wife is into it, I like a lot of the new stuff they put on (and a lot of it is by artists in their 20s), I don't like hardly anything on pop radio.