Overcoming Life's Obstacles

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tyler24

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Jun 19, 2006
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I've seen meditation mentioned a few times. I'm just starting to figure out what is going on and still have a ton of work to do, but this was recommended by a doctor without any real guidance. The better half installed a meditation app on my phone and asked me to use it. First time went ok. The second time made me so angry I wanted to find the person behind the voice and strangle her. I threw my headphones across the room.

It seems peak anxiety is not a time to jump into meditation with no guidance. :confused::)
As someone who is getting into doing it, I'm up to doing it 30 minutes at a time, what I can tell you to focus on not judging your thoughts. What I have learned is that we all have positive and negative perceptions and they are different for every person. Through meditation, you teach yourself to not judge the thoughts in your head, you teach yourself to just move onto the next one or being in the moment.
 
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Cyclonepride

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Definitely anxiety and depression. Have worked extremely hard over the years but just this past march got food poisoning one evening and basically was in a full panic attack for the next month.

Slowly getting back to where I was before. One thing I’ve learned is I can never stop working on it. I need to continue working out, practicing meditation/mindfulness along with proper nutrition/supplements.

With that being said I have been suffering from Low T as well. First discovered it a few years ago and just recently started working with a great urologist who we are putting together a plan to address this. It won’t be a magic bullet but hopefully it helps with some issues like fatigue, brain fog, recovery, etc. I have total T of a 65 year old and the one that really matters is the free T which is at the level of an 80+ year old...I’m only 30.

edit to add: anyone that is struggling with any of these things please reach out. I’ll be happy to help in anyway I can. Sometimes even just talking about it with someone else can help. Knowing you aren’t the only one is very important to remember.
I'll second this. Anxiety and depression are not permanent states. You can work through it.
 

Bipolarcy

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Oct 27, 2008
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I am curious what kind of obstacles people on here have overcome in their lives and what they credit for helping them get through it.

If anyone has seen my posts in the past, I talk a lot about my anxiety. It has been severe ever since I was a child. I would walk into school in the mornings and immediately go to the nurses station and request to go home sick because of it. It eventually escalated to severe panic attacks where I thought I was going to die. The best way I can describe a panic attack for those who haven't had one is the feeling you get when someone jumps out from behind a corner at you but the feeling isn't just half a second, it lasts for a while.

I began associating that feeling with everything. From being in wide open spaces to being too far from home. In a sense, I became agoraphobic and could relate any situation to my fear which caused it to grow. Back in March I had a severe panic attack that nearly pushed me to moving back home, but through perseverance and meditation, I am doing as well with my anxiety as I have ever done and plan to continue to work on this issue so that I can write a book about facing fear and overcoming it.

I know we have a ton of tough people on here because cyclone fans have had to endure a lot of nut kicks in our lives, but I am curious what people have faced and overcome outside of the elite 8, Hampton, Niang's broken foot, and Florida State.

Let's hear it!
I was in a car accident the summer after I graduated high school and already enrolled at Iowa State. My friend wanted to go to a movie that I didn't really want to see because I was not a big fan of horror movies. It was called the Abominable Dr. Phibes with Vincent Price. We were going about 65, when a carload of teenagers shot out of a crossroad, blowing a stop sign, and we T-boned them.

My head went through the passenger side windshield and glass scraped across my eye. The result was, I spent about a week in the hospital, and was on the critical list for about three days, lost most of the vision in my left eye, although the doctors at the Mayo Clinic were amazed I had any vision left whatsoever, and wound up with 160-some stitches in my forehead and 6 more in my left eye.

There was nothing they could do to improve the vision in the eye except make it just good enough so that it would bother my vision in the other eye, because they weren't exactly looking at the same thing after the accident. They would have had to refocus the bad eye and they weren't sure how they were going to do that. It would have required more surgery, likely, and the results weren't guaranteed. And the best they could do with a contact lens AND the most powerful lens they make is about 20-40 vision and I would have looked like a supervillain with glasses where one lens was a fish-eye magnifying my bad eye and the other was plain glass.

It was an adjustment getting used to life with just one eye. You don't realize how much you depend on two eyes for depth perception until you lose the use of one. Things like driving a car, especially backing up and especially in trying to park, judging the distance between you and the two cars you're trying to park in between, shooting a basketball, playing catch with a baseball (it was easy if the ball was thrown off to my side a little bit, but if it came straight for my head, I was in trouble.) Oh, and I can't watch a 3-D movie, because you need two good eyes for that. I was picking glass out of my head and my forehead was tender to the touch for months afterward.

There were certain careers that were dead to me, like being an airplane pilot, or a truck driver, and the military would have considered me 4F, not that I ever considered any of those occupations, but they weren't an option for me even if I had.

We sued and got screwed. You hear about all these multimillion dollar settlements for stupid things like coffee being too hot, but this was a legitimate claim and we wound up settling for I think $50K and the lawyer got a third. My parents got some of it to cover hospital bills that weren't covered by insurance and I wound up with about $20K.

A month after we settled, I saw a case where a guy was hammering a nail, mishit it and the nail flew up and stabbed him in the eye. He settled for $2.5 million. I always thought that was unfair considering he did it to himself and I was an innocent victim. But the difference was, he did it while working for a deep-pockets company and my injury was caused by people with only liability insurance that was capped at $25K, which my lawyer tried to explain to me was as much as we could hope to get. If that was the case, how did we wind up with $50K? To this day, I think I had the crappiest lawyer money could buy. And they later made him a judge in Algona.

This was in 1971, when I hadn't turned 18 yet.
 
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ArgentCy

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Jan 13, 2010
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Can you link me to an Mg Optimizer? I have the oxide form but would be willing to try something different.
Sorry, didn't see this before. Can probably buy many places but this has been what worked for me. I take one just about everyday. And it's about the only thing I take everyday besides Vitamin C.

https://www.iherb.com/pr/Jarrow-Formulas-Magnesium-Optimizer-200-Tablets/261

It's amazing as I was trying to figure these things out and that this is not just in your head. There are real physical effects as well and it's not that hard to measure. What is hard to measure is the amount of Magnesium in your body or blood, there aren't tests available that are real accurate. If I wanted to start feeling anxious all you have to do is take a similarly sized Calcium pill, wait about 30 mins or a little more and there it was. Take the Mg and it would go back away. The curious thing is that MgO works similarly to Ca because of the unique bonding strength to the oxide.

And there are some real physical results that you have that lead to the anxiety being a real thing. It's not just a pattern of thoughts or whatnot. The thing that led me here was that I would often grind my teeth at night. Now, there is absolutely nothing I could be thinking to "want" to do that because I was asleep. Well, turns out that Magnesium deficiency is a potential cause of grinding your teeth. So if you do that as well I would seriously look at adding a good Mg supplement to see if that helps with both.
 
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diaclone

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These stories have been fascinating and inspiring too. They sure got me to think some about obstacles and I tried to figure out my own obstacles. As I pondered this question, I saw my life as an evolution.

In 2007 I attended a monthly (for three or four months) Men's leadership training. Alot of it was about examining ourselves as leaders. The three facilitators were great - one of the three was a woman who was social worker that also did counseling, coaching and therapy. As part of the leadership program, we had a one hour one on one session with one of the facilitators. I signed up for a session with the woman. I got a ton out of the one on one, and I then chose to be a client as I knew I needed help.

At that time, I'd put on a ton of weight. I was a manager (I liked the teams I had) but my peer managers were all about command and control rather than leading and coaching and building. It was a constant effort to resist the old style management that they wanted to force me to follow. After every weekly manager meeting would take a pain killer for headaches. I continued to see the facilitator regularly for years. She also got me to vist a tarot card reader, whom I now see once a year for a reading.

With her help, I eventually got to a new doctor (who told me to lose weight and more), I journaled every night for years, lost weight through weight watchers and it has stayed off since I made my goal in fall 2009. Again with her help, I approached my boss to tell him that I wanted to do something different and they created a new position for me in 2009. Then in 2013, she guided me how to leave my org and I moved to consulting. (I went to my boss in 2013, invited him to lunch, and asked him how could we reorg me out of the organization as I wanted to do something different, He was stunned to say the least, but didn't really take my request seriously at that time. I actually had a dream that was a trigger for me to leave. I also took a week long course out of town where I stayed at a hostel and journaled every night about what I wanted to do. )

I also read a ton of self help books. One of the best was "King, Warrior, Magician, Lover" - every male should read this.

I just did not realize how "sick" I was physically, emotionally, and spiritually years ago.

Life is still a journey and the one of the best pieces of advice I ever received was "We're all unfinished."
 
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madguy30

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Not a total fix-it and it's part of the meditation aspect but I encourage anyone to find something they can do as a hobby that forces them to slow down or work through a process to get to a result.

I've not ever been diagnosed or felt I needed to find out but any time I've found myself on the verge of these types of things, a few hours of wading a stream, camping (tent) for a night or two or whatever has not only slowed things down, but also gave me a chance to really work through to see where the root of my feelings/thoughts are rooted.

And repeating but real time spent in real nature has been found to lower anxiety. I had a friend who was experiencing some anxiety and her Dr. flat out told her to go stand in her yard barefoot for like 20 minutes/day...it's purely anecdotal but she found positive results.
 
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1UNI2ISU

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This thread is awesome. Wondering if I can ask some advice, if not feel free to move on.

My 9 year old daughter deals with bouts of anxiety (especially when she doesn't feel well or if she has a negative interaction with a friend). As someone that doesn't know what it's like to experience that, are there any strategies or anything that I can use to help her from the outside or is that something that she just needs to work through on her end with just 'general support'. She calls it 'what-iffing'.

Thanks everybody! Your candor makes this an eye opening experience!
 
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brianhos

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Got a cpap at age 31. Game changer. It’s weird. It’s sucks as first. Testing is awful. But so worth it.

I’ve since lost about 30 lbs and not sure how necessary it still is but I still use it willingly.

There’s another massive life hurdle I’ve overcome but I’ll keep that one behind the curtain. Anyone can overcome many many things if they ask for help and accept what life’s thrown at them.
I got one because of sleep apnea at the end of may. I am still fighting it, but I already do feel better during the day. Some nights I have actually started to dream again, which has not happened in years. Still have not slept through an entire night straight, hoping that comes soon.
 

JM4CY

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I got one because of sleep apnea at the end of may. I am still fighting it, but I already do feel better during the day. Some nights I have actually started to dream again, which has not happened in years. Still have not slept through an entire night straight, hoping that comes soon.
Hang in there. It will come.

oh I hear you on the dreams. The first night I woke up from some vivid dreams wondering I had smoked a bunch of dope or something.
 

Joe4Cy

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This seems minor, and thanks for sharing to create an open forum. I suffer with Restless Leg Syndrome or Periodic Limb movement. We're still trying to figure things out. On my second type of prescription now and it works ...some? I still have some nights with minor disruptions, some with what feels like no sleep at all, and others where I sleep the whole night.

When I first went on a Rx, I discovered the importance of quality sleep and my dreams returned! I think, over time, my body became accustomed to the meds. My new Rx isn't as effective as the first initially.

Long story short - I've tried magnesium and now want to try this. I'll keep you posted.

Sorry, didn't see this before. Can probably buy many places but this has been what worked for me. I take one just about everyday. And it's about the only thing I take everyday besides Vitamin C.

https://www.iherb.com/pr/Jarrow-Formulas-Magnesium-Optimizer-200-Tablets/261
 

cycloneworld

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This has been a great thread. I'll jump in to show that anxiety can just show up and affect someone who has never had any noticeable issues before. About a year and a half ago, I started having problems staying asleep, I'd wake up in the middle of the night and my mind would be racing with bad thoughts: I have cancer, I'm going to get fired, my wife is going to leave me, my parents were doing to die - and I couldn't shut it off. That continued for several months intermittently and then I started having a weird, dull pain in my shoulder, and of course I was convinced it was cancer. So I went to the doctor who found nothing wrong with me. The dull pain continued, the sleeping issues persisted until I would wake up in a fog everyone morning. I wasn't tired but I'd best describe it as "fuzzy" (kind of like when you've had a couple of drinks and are slightly buzzed) and that would last most of the day. I go back to the doctor, again convinced I'm going to die, and she tells me she thinks its anxiety. She also puts me on a low dose of blood pressure meds since that's been high for my last several visits. Once she assured me (in my mind) that was it - almost immediately I started to feel better. The foggy/fuzzy feeling went away, the "pain" in my shoulder went away, and I felt normal again. But when I get overly stressed from work, I feel those items creeping back in. I stop, tell myself its anxiety, and it goes away much quicker.

Long story short, I empathize with anyone struggling with anxiety - its a pesky *****. I had no issues before this and am 95% "better" today but can still feel it try to creep back in every so often. I also felt that just talking about it with other people helped me a lot compared to keeping it all in and letting my mind race.
 

tyler24

Well-Known Member
Jun 19, 2006
2,207
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These stories have been fascinating and inspiring too. They sure got me to think some about obstacles and I tried to figure out my own obstacles. As I pondered this question, I saw my life as an evolution.

In 2007 I attended a monthly (for three or four months) Men's leadership training. Alot of it was about examining ourselves as leaders. The three facilitators were great - one of the three was a woman who was social worker that also did counseling, coaching and therapy. As part of the leadership program, we had a one hour one on one session with one of the facilitators. I signed up for a session with the woman. I got a ton out of the one on one, and I then chose to be a client as I knew I needed help.

At that time, I'd put on a ton of weight. I was a manager (I liked the teams I had) but my peer managers were all about command and control rather than leading and coaching and building. It was a constant effort to resist the old style management that they wanted to force me to follow. After every weekly manager meeting would take a pain killer for headaches. I continued to see the facilitator regularly for years. She also got me to vist a tarot card reader, whom I now see once a year for a reading.

With her help, I eventually got to a new doctor (who told me to lose weight and more), I journaled every night for years, lost weight through weight watchers and it has stayed off since I made my goal in fall 2009. Again with her help, I approached my boss to tell him that I wanted to do something different and they created a new position for me in 2009. Then in 2013, she guided me how to leave my org and I moved to consulting. (I went to my boss in 2013, invited him to lunch, and asked him how could we reorg me out of the organization as I wanted to do something different, He was stunned to say the least, but didn't really take my request seriously at that time. I actually had a dream that was a trigger for me to leave. I also took a week long course out of town where I stayed at a hostel and journaled every night about what I wanted to do. )

I also read a ton of self help books. One of the best was "King, Warrior, Magician, Lover" - every male should read this.

I just did not realize how "sick" I was physically, emotionally, and spiritually years ago.

Life is still a journey and the one of the best pieces of advice I ever received was "We're all unfinished."
Awesome story! Proud of the fact that you are finding you and following you! I immediately ordered the book! Thanks for the recommendation!
 
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tyler24

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This thread is awesome. Wondering if I can ask some advice, if not feel free to move on.

My 9 year old daughter deals with bouts of anxiety (especially when she doesn't feel well or if she has a negative interaction with a friend). As someone that doesn't know what it's like to experience that, are there any strategies or anything that I can use to help her from the outside or is that something that she just needs to work through on her end with just 'general support'. She calls it 'what-iffing'.

Thanks everybody! Your candor makes this an eye opening experience!
The professional in me says to find a good therapist. I'm a firm believer everyone should have a good therapist because we all have problems. Find one your child clicks with as we are more likely to share things with those we like.

The personal side of me says to make sure you don't coddle your child. I was coddled by my mother, any discomfort I felt, she was there to rescue me. What I'm learning about anxiety is it will pass if you face it. My personal theory on this is because anxiety is there to keep us alive. If something is truly dangerous, we will not continue to face it. But if we continue to face it, we are telling our body that this is not really dangerous.
 

tyler24

Well-Known Member
Jun 19, 2006
2,207
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This has been a great thread. I'll jump in to show that anxiety can just show up and affect someone who has never had any noticeable issues before. About a year and a half ago, I started having problems staying asleep, I'd wake up in the middle of the night and my mind would be racing with bad thoughts: I have cancer, I'm going to get fired, my wife is going to leave me, my parents were doing to die - and I couldn't shut it off. That continued for several months intermittently and then I started having a weird, dull pain in my shoulder, and of course I was convinced it was cancer. So I went to the doctor who found nothing wrong with me. The dull pain continued, the sleeping issues persisted until I would wake up in a fog everyone morning. I wasn't tired but I'd best describe it as "fuzzy" (kind of like when you've had a couple of drinks and are slightly buzzed) and that would last most of the day. I go back to the doctor, again convinced I'm going to die, and she tells me she thinks its anxiety. She also puts me on a low dose of blood pressure meds since that's been high for my last several visits. Once she assured me (in my mind) that was it - almost immediately I started to feel better. The foggy/fuzzy feeling went away, the "pain" in my shoulder went away, and I felt normal again. But when I get overly stressed from work, I feel those items creeping back in. I stop, tell myself its anxiety, and it goes away much quicker.

Long story short, I empathize with anyone struggling with anxiety - its a pesky *****. I had no issues before this and am 95% "better" today but can still feel it try to creep back in every so often. I also felt that just talking about it with other people helped me a lot compared to keeping it all in and letting my mind race.
You sound a lot like me! The amount of times I've been convinced I was dying from some ailment is unreal. Had tests on my heart, lungs, blood work, ect. I'm happy to hear you are doing much better! Keep up the awesome work!
 
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Cyclonepride

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This thread is awesome. Wondering if I can ask some advice, if not feel free to move on.

My 9 year old daughter deals with bouts of anxiety (especially when she doesn't feel well or if she has a negative interaction with a friend). As someone that doesn't know what it's like to experience that, are there any strategies or anything that I can use to help her from the outside or is that something that she just needs to work through on her end with just 'general support'. She calls it 'what-iffing'.

Thanks everybody! Your candor makes this an eye opening experience!
That's a tough one, and I don't know exactly how to translate what I've experienced to what strategies would work for a child, but I'll tell you what helps me.

I think you want to establish the fact that most of the things we worry about (what-if) never, ever come to pass. Another is to focus on one thing at a time (bouncing from problem to problem in your mind combines them into one big thing, and leads to overwhelm). Last, when I realize I'm dwelling on a problem, I try to come up with a step that I could take toward a solution. That gives a sense of control, and of working toward betterment.

Beyond that, it's learning how to redirect your mind. What is so great about meditation is that it's like a learning process for that, and there are some great, and extremely simple, lessons that you can find online for that. Once that ability is learned, it's fairly simple to stop yourself before you get worked up by essentially either blanking out your mind for a few seconds, or by redirecting it to another topic (maybe for a child, sing a song in her head (or out loud) that she likes).

If you'd like some reading, I've taken a lot from Tony Robbins, as he is very good at helping you discover and break down your thought process to make it work for you rather than against you.
 

Cyclonepride

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This seems minor, and thanks for sharing to create an open forum. I suffer with Restless Leg Syndrome or Periodic Limb movement. We're still trying to figure things out. On my second type of prescription now and it works ...some? I still have some nights with minor disruptions, some with what feels like no sleep at all, and others where I sleep the whole night.

When I first went on a Rx, I discovered the importance of quality sleep and my dreams returned! I think, over time, my body became accustomed to the meds. My new Rx isn't as effective as the first initially.

Long story short - I've tried magnesium and now want to try this. I'll keep you posted.
Have you tried weighted blankets? I have those issues from time to time, and I put a folded up blanket at the foot of my bed as the pressure seems to help. But I'd really like to have a weighted blanket.
 

1100011CS

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Oct 5, 2007
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I have several lingering side effects from cancer surgeries and treatment. I just try to remember how lucky I am to still be here and that my wife forced me to go to Mayo instead of letting the hospital to the east continue to try and kill me. I hated them before but that experience really ingrained it.
 

1UNI2ISU

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That's a tough one, and I don't know exactly how to translate what I've experienced to what strategies would work for a child, but I'll tell you what helps me.

I think you want to establish the fact that most of the things we worry about (what-if) never, ever come to pass. Another is to focus on one thing at a time (bouncing from problem to problem in your mind combines them into one big thing, and leads to overwhelm). Last, when I realize I'm dwelling on a problem, I try to come up with a step that I could take toward a solution. That gives a sense of control, and of working toward betterment.

Beyond that, it's learning how to redirect your mind. What is so great about meditation is that it's like a learning process for that, and there are some great, and extremely simple, lessons that you can find online for that. Once that ability is learned, it's fairly simple to stop yourself before you get worked up by essentially either blanking out your mind for a few seconds, or by redirecting it to another topic (maybe for a child, sing a song in her head (or out loud) that she likes).

If you'd like some reading, I've taken a lot from Tony Robbins, as he is very good at helping you discover and break down your thought process to make it work for you rather than against you.
That's awesome! Thanks!
 
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mj4cy

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4 years ago I started noticing arm weakness, then dizziness, heart fluttering, muscle weakness and some shakiness. I was a wreck. I figured it was cancer or the start of ALS. I got looked at by 4 different doctors 6+ times and no one could really figure anything out which made me worse. Eventually it just kind of went away but part of me thinks all the symptoms were a response to a nasty penicillin shot I had for strep, a side effect to strep, or anxiety.

Ever since, if I notice anything with my body I get anxiety attacks that it's cancer, some disease or now lately Covid. I got tested for Covid last week due to symptoms (actually came from reaction to a tetanus shot) and came back negative. Today I feel like my smell/taste isn't as strong as normal so I've been on high alert anxiety it could be Covid...then later I realize I have zero other symptoms, just tested negative and its probably anxiety. I don't know much about how to cope with anxiety but I know its real. Luckily, I just get small doses of it here and there but my heart goes out to those who have it 24/7. I can usually logic my way out of feelings/nervousness but its not always easy.
 
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Cyclonepride

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4 years ago I started noticing arm weakness, then dizziness, heart fluttering, muscle weakness and some shakiness. I was a wreck. I figured it was cancer or the start of ALS. I got looked at by 4 different doctors 6+ times and no one could really figure anything out which made me worse. Eventually it just kind of went away but part of me thinks all the symptoms were a response to a nasty penicillin shot I had for strep, a side effect to strep, or anxiety.

Ever since, if I notice anything with my body I get anxiety attacks that it's cancer, some disease or now lately Covid. I got tested for Covid last week due to symptoms (actually came from reaction to a tetanus shot) and came back negative. Today I feel like my smell/taste isn't as strong as normal so I've been on high alert anxiety it could be Covid...then later I realize I have zero other symptoms, just tested negative and its probably anxiety. I don't know much how to cope with anxiety but I know its real. Luckily, I just get small doses of it here and there but my heart goes out to those who have it 24/7. I can usually logic my way out of feelings/nervousness but its not always easy.
Life is funny in that way.

We are given control of an incredible, complex and completely unique machine, with no instruction manual. You can get instruction manuals, but they may not be relevant to your model. Or maybe part of them is. Who knows? At any rate, we only really have the capacity to teach you about 5% of what you need to know, and you probably won't truly absorb what you're taught because you often only truly understand through experience.