Fertilizing my lawn for initial spring application

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jdoggivjc

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Sep 27, 2006
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Macomb, MI
This is just one of those things I hire out and have it professionally done. I've done the math, and with the size of my yard it's just as cost-effective to have someone else do it, plus I don't have to worry about trying to figure out when to do it as it almost always seems like the weather here conflicts with my schedule to do it, plus I almost always leave burns and dead spots in my yard when I do it myself. My wife and I do almost all the rest of our yardwork, including mowing, but I'm done with fertilizing my yard myself.
 

nocsious3

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Aug 23, 2013
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View attachment 72016

This is what an unseasonably cool and wet Spring does in Kansas.

I just put down my second application last week and did a liquid full lawn weed spray in between.

You could shoot pool on this.
Excellent color!

I walked my subdivision last night. The dandelions must be afraid of Covid-19, as I had trouble finding any. It's the best I've ever seen the neighborhood look. People must be reading this thread.
 
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nocsious3

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Today's tip: Start cutting your lawns higher in preparation for warmer temps. Longer grass shades the soil and prevents it from drying out as fast. Longer grass also appears darker. Most of you have turf type tall fescue, so going into the warmer months you should cut on your mower's highest setting which is typically around 4".
 

Acylum

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Nov 18, 2006
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Today's tip: Start cutting your lawns higher in preparation for warmer temps. Longer grass shades the soil and prevents it from drying out as fast. Longer grass also appears darker. Most of you have turf type tall fescue, so going into the warmer months you should cut on your mower's highest setting which is typically around 4".
I do this religiously and it really does make a difference when it gets hot and/or dry. The problem is I have one area, maybe 15% of the lawn, where the grass will lay down so badly it doesn’t really even get cut when I mow. I’ve never really been able to figure out why I have that one problem area.
 

nocsious3

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Aug 23, 2013
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I do this religiously and it really does make a difference when it gets hot and/or dry. The problem is I have one area, maybe 15% of the lawn, where the grass will lay down so badly it doesn’t really even get cut when I mow. I’ve never really been able to figure out why I have that one problem area.
so you have floppy grass....
Some varieties don't do as well at the higher cut, especially super modern cultivars of bluegrass. Sometimes an area is a bit thin, but still looks full because the fescue sprawls out to take advantage of the extra light available around it. Try raking the section lightly with a leaf rake and then mowing and see if that can get it to grow more upright. Overseed that area in the fall to get more grass plants established, that way they'll be forced to grow tall to fight for the sun.
 

Tre4ISU

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www.canr.msu.edu/news/white_clover_and_black_medic_infesting_turf

Says here, "The most effective herbicides for controlling black medic and white clover contain the active ingredient clopyralid, fluroxypyr or quinclorac."

extension.wsu.edu/whitman/2013/10/black-medic/

Says here, "Herbicides that contain triclopyr, dicamba, clopyralid, or 2,4-D combinations are generally effective if applied correctly, usually in early spring or fall when the plant is young and actively growing. More than one application may be necessary."

I'd invest in a bottle of something like Gordon's t-zone, as that's a handy and powerful cocktail of weed killers that would be useful for your black medic problem and other broadleaf weeds. Please follow the label rates and apply during the recommended temperatures, as t-zone is a little less forgiving then your typical bottle of weed killer. Another option would be to buy a bottle of Quinclorac name brand Drive. It would work on the black medic and also come in handy for post emergent crabgrass, if that's a problem in your lawn. You'll need to go to a lawn and landscape store to find these products or order online from somebody like www.doyourownpestcontrol.com
If you want to get rid of weeds in your yard, you want clopyralid. I would recommend a product called Confront. It's very safe. Grazon is a product a lot of people use but it's too persistent and leaches out to easily for my liking. That's the Milestone in it. Stinger is the common trade name for clopyralid. The T-zone stuff is fine but not real neccesary.
 

Tre4ISU

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Dethatching seems odd to me. Why would you remove organic material from your yard that is eventually going to replenish top soil?
The problem is that thatch doesn't break down and it hinders the healthy living grass. Ideally, you would thatch and compost that into a substance to redistribute over your lawn or garden. Thatch just isn't good for growing healthy grass. There's a reason golf courses get rid of it often.
 

Tre4ISU

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I do this religiously and it really does make a difference when it gets hot and/or dry. The problem is I have one area, maybe 15% of the lawn, where the grass will lay down so badly it doesn’t really even get cut when I mow. I’ve never really been able to figure out why I have that one problem area.
You also keep the cut edge of the grass farther off the ground which will allow it to stay farther away from potential disease infection.
 

nocsious3

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Aug 23, 2013
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If you want to get rid of weeds in your yard, you want clopyralid. I would recommend a product called Confront. It's very safe. Grazon is a product a lot of people use but it's too persistent and leaches out to easily for my liking. That's the Milestone in it. Stinger is the common trade name for clopyralid. The T-zone stuff is fine but not real neccesary.
clopyralid-
DowAgro, the manufacturer of clopyralid, voluntarily deregistered it for use on domestic lawns in the US[5] and it is banned in several US states

from the Contront label:
Product Overview
FOR COMMERCIAL USE ONLY. Not Labeled for Residential Use.

This product cannot be used on residential turf. It is a professional grade product. Please do not purchase unless you are familiar with applying commercial herbicide products.

In California, New York, Oregon and Washington, turfgrass and lawn uses are restricted to golf courses only.
 
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nocsious3

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Aug 23, 2013
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Didn't know that. Great. Now people can dump copious amounts of other stuff on that doesn't work.
Triclopyr works pretty well on clover and ground ivy. It's normally advertised at the hardware store as poison ivy and brush killer, but has a turf application rate and won't harm cool season grasses when applied correctly. I like T-zone because it's a product that can kill almost any weed the common homeowner would encounter and is powerful, however care must be taken to follow the label because it is pretty potent.
 

Tre4ISU

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clopyralid-
DowAgro, the manufacturer of clopyralid, voluntarily deregistered it for use on domestic lawns in the US[5] and it is banned in several US states

from the Contront label:
Product Overview
FOR COMMERCIAL USE ONLY. Not Labeled for Residential Use.

This product cannot be used on residential turf. It is a professional grade product. Please do not purchase unless you are familiar with applying commercial herbicide products.

In California, New York, Oregon and Washington, turfgrass and lawn uses are restricted to golf courses only.
Looks like they pulled it because of residual in compost going to other species which makes sense I guess.
 

Tre4ISU

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Dec 30, 2008
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Triclopyr works pretty well on clover and ground ivy. It's normally advertised at the hardware store as poison ivy and brush killer, but has a turf application rate and won't harm cool season grasses when applied correctly. I like T-zone because it's a product that can kill almost any weed the common homeowner would encounter and is powerful, however care must be taken to follow the label because it is pretty potent.
It's dicamba and 2,4-D. Personally, the thought of Joe homeowner using dicamba is frightening. People that have sprayed herbicides all their life struggle with it.