John Deere strike imminent?

Cyclones1969

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In case you haven't figured it out yet, your style of blowhard shaming generally doesn't work here...
Why did you make up a ridiculous anecdote?

and of course Texas cut off ue benefits. Now explain how that impacted employment and wages.
 

Cyclones1969

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Like everything. Capitalism is the worst economic system, except for all the others.

At least in capitalism private business (and individuals) has some power to stand up to government power. Look what happens when the same people control the levers of power of both government and business. Nothing good. Corruption at best, totalitarianism at worst.
So trying to squeeze every cent of profit out of any good or service, benefits poor and powerless how?
 
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Cyclones1969

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I didn't make anything up. But continue on...
I have lots of friends who own bars and restaurants too. They didn’t have a shortage of workers because they adapted. Bigger chain restaurants did have problems because people didn’t want to work for $2.13 an hour


now, how did cutting off ue benefits early positively impact the people that were receiving them?
 
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Macloney

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By "free money" I mean money from the government that they give you when you are unemployed, and you do not have to work at any job to receive. Perhaps I could have been clearer about that.

Unemployment insurance is paid by employers, not employees; its part of payroll tax. It isn't a savings plan employees contribute to, that can be drawn on later when you are unemployed. I suppose an economist might say wages would be marginally higher if employers didn't have to pay it, so in that sense it could have been given to the employee instead.
I know how unemployment insurance works, but the money wasn't from normal unemployment. It was from the Federal Government and the last time I checked that money came from the same place that all of their money comes from, citizens taxes.
 

jbhtexas

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I have lots of friends who own bars and restaurants too. They didn’t have a shortage of workers because they adapted. Bigger chain restaurants did have problems because people didn’t want to work for $2.13 an hour


now, how did cutting off ue benefits early positively impact the people that were receiving them?
I'm glad that your friends did well. It could be that the circumstances are different in different areas of the country.

As for terminating benefits early, it made some people who really didn't need those benefits get jobs, and once again become productive members of society. Which benefits both them and society, and leaves money for those who really need it. The ones who really can't find jobs can still get benefits, but the process is more difficult.

The Covid benefit program has been wrought with fraud. It's so bad that CNN had to report it. Also, a nice little blurb about the restaurant worker shortage at the end of that article. Your friends were very fortunate to not have been affected by it.

 

MeowingCows

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I'm not following. Does having a college degree suddenly make you unable to turn a wrench?
It's possible they wouldn't do it as well as someone whose career is to do so for many years, professionally. Or to assemble parts in complicated machines, weld, operate machinery to perform tasks, ...

Some tasks are easily-replaceable, certainly. But I'm not buying that most of Deere's workforce does jobs as simple as turning wrenches all the time.
 

mramseyISU

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Sounds like there is an injunction against the union that is limiting them to 8 picketers near Deere property in Davenport. No idea if that applies to other sites.
 
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isufbcurt

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I'm not following. Does having a college degree suddenly make you unable to turn a wrench?
No but if I am hired by a company to be an accountant that's the job they hired me for. I didn't apply and get hired to put together equipment. Just my opinion, I enjoy working on equipment but that's not what you hired me for.
 

Pope

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I'm not following. Does having a college degree suddenly make you unable to turn a wrench?
No, it does not. But would you buy a truck that was assembled by Ford's office employees who've never turned a wrench or even observed an auto assembly line?
 

MeowingCows

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No, it does not. But would you buy a truck that was assembled by Ford's office employees who've never turned a wrench or even observed an auto assembly line?
Or ones assembled in the US vs Canada vs Mexico vs Japan vs South Korea, etc... real arguments people actually do already have about cars.

All of those places have people who can turn wrenches, but certain areas have reputations for producing a better product with their wrench-turners.
 

mramseyISU

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Or ones assembled in the US vs Canada vs Mexico vs Japan vs South Korea, etc... real arguments people actually do already have about cars.

All of those places have people who can turn wrenches, but certain areas have reputations for producing a better product with their wrench-turners.
50 years ago it might have made a difference. Now though I haven't ever been in a factory where that mattered. It's not like somebody drops a pile of parts on the floor and says build me a car. Every part is barcoded, every fastener is torque controlled by a "smart tool" and on and on. The assembly process is designed and controlled by the salary side not the union side. The salary guys are who trains them to do their job. For a couple days it'll be rough, if this goes on for a couple months it'll be fine.
 

VeloClone

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No but if I am hired by a company to be an accountant that's the job they hired me for. I didn't apply and get hired to put together equipment. Just my opinion, I enjoy working on equipment but that's not what you hired me for.
Just about every full time job that I have had since college has "other duties as assigned" or something similar in the job description. Employers can get by with assigning other duties on a short time basis. They start to run afoul when they become a regularly long term part of the job.
 

snowcraig2.0

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Sounds like there is an injunction against the union that is limiting them to 8 picketers near Deere property in Davenport. No idea if that applies to other sites.
I would assume that is coming. They do not have the right to block entrances to the facilities.
 

isufbcurt

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Just about every full time job that I have had since college has "other duties as assigned" or something similar in the job description. Employers can get by with assigning other duties on a short time basis. They start to run afoul when they become a regularly long term part of the job.
I once worked at a job where the SVP of my department liked to loan out people in our department to other departments in order to show he was "helpful" to the company and to get in good with the CFO. Then we started losing employees and he was dumbfounded as to why. I told him bluntly, these people came here to work in Internal Audit, they didn't come here to help Investment Accounting, the call center or whatever department you think makes you look better. He was like "Oh".
 
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Gunnerclone

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It's possible they wouldn't do it as well as someone whose career is to do so for many years, professionally. Or to assemble parts in complicated machines, weld, operate machinery to perform tasks, ...

Some tasks are easily-replaceable, certainly. But I'm not buying that most of Deere's workforce does jobs as simple as turning wrenches all the time.
There is no way that someone can just step in and be as fast and efficient as a worker that has been doing a job day in day out for months and years no matter what the job is. I couldn’t go in to McDonalds and run the drive thru or be the fry guy at the same level as some HS drop out that has been doing it for any meaningful amount of time.
 

jbhtexas

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That's only for the money that Texas provides, not the extra money provided by the Fed.

You can try to spin your restaurant story any way you want, dude.
I would suggest you read the two links below. The federal unemployment benefits money was administered through the states, as an addition to the state-provided unemployment benefit.

FPUC was an add-on to state benefits, so you had to receive a state benefit (and some states required the participant to be actively working for work, like Texas). PEUC required the applicant to be actively looking for work, regardless of what the state's requirement was:
The CARES Act established the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program to allow people who had exhausted their unemployment compensation benefits to receive up to 13 additional weeks of benefits, provided they "are able to work, available to work, and actively seeking work.