Coaching Salaries

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CyState85

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May 8, 2019
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Read through this article on ESPN and was surprised to learn just how much college coaches make compared to other state employees. Not saying they don’t deserve the money and not saying it should go to the players, but it is interesting that the highest paid employees are basketball or football coaches in 42 of the 50 states.

http://www.espn.com/espn/feature/st...d-state-employees&id=28261213&redirected=true

The three thoughts I had were:

1) College coaches are paid significantly more money over the last 10 years. For example, Saban was paid $3.1 million in 2009 compared to $8.9 million this year. He was the second highest paid coach in 2009 and 2019 in NCAA football. Is it conceivable to have $20 million a year contracts by 2029 at the current rate?

2) How much revenue does an elite college team generate vs a pro team on game days? I’m curious what the numbers look like with ticket sales, parking passes, concessions/apparel sales. I’m sure a coaching salary can be darn near covered after one home game.

3) How the hell can Purdue afford to pay Jeff Brohm $6.6 million per year?!?
 

SCNCY

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Sep 11, 2009
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While coaches are state employees, most of their salary comes from revenue generated through the athletic department and not necessarily state government funds. So it is a little of a grey area comparing college coaches to a typical government employee due to where the money is coming from.

With that being said, the rate at which these salaries are increasing is alarming. There are now some coordinators making more than what Rhoads was making in his first year.

https://www.iowastatedaily.com/news...cle_3e50d6ad-0b04-5ec1-8ecb-f642a9f36712.html
 

Clonefan32

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Nov 19, 2008
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I was just having this conversation with a friend the other day when I read Doyle makes $800,000.00 a year as Iowa's strength and conditioning coach. As a sports fan I think you become inundated with these high figures and become kind of numb to how much money these people are making. But if you really think about it, paying the coaches of a game this amount of money is just mind blowing. Head coaches making multi-millions and assistants in the high six figures to coach, recruit and call plays. When you have college strength and conditioning coaches out earning heart surgeons the whole thing may one off the rails a bit.

But I suppose the market dictates that kind of pay and if you see a return on your investment, so be it.
 

mtowncyclone13

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I was just having this conversation with a friend the other day when I read Doyle makes $800,000.00 a year as Iowa's strength and conditioning coach. As a sports fan I think you become inundated with these high figures and become kind of numb to how much money these people are making. But if you really think about it, paying the coaches of a game this amount of money is just mind blowing. Head coaches making multi-millions and assistants in the high six figures to coach, recruit and call plays. When you have college strength and conditioning coaches out earning heart surgeons the whole thing may one off the rails a bit.

But I suppose the market dictates that kind of pay and if you see a return on your investment, so be it.
This isn't on you, but I'm sick of hearing "the market" requires things. Why do leaving CEOs get golden parachutes? Well, "the market" demands it. But the economy is built to serve people, not the other way around. If everyone just stopped then "the market" would stop.

All in all, I actually think college coaches have a more stressful job than NFL coaches. NFL coaches don't spend their entire existence away from their family recruiting.
 
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SEIOWA CLONE

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Dec 19, 2018
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Read through this article on ESPN and was surprised to learn just how much college coaches make compared to other state employees. Not saying they don’t deserve the money and not saying it should go to the players, but it is interesting that the highest paid employees are basketball or football coaches in 42 of the 50 states.

http://www.espn.com/espn/feature/st...d-state-employees&id=28261213&redirected=true

The three thoughts I had were:

1) College coaches are paid significantly more money over the last 10 years. For example, Saban was paid $3.1 million in 2009 compared to $8.9 million this year. He was the second highest paid coach in 2009 and 2019 in NCAA football. Is it conceivable to have $20 million a year contracts by 2029 at the current rate?

2) How much revenue does an elite college team generate vs a pro team on game days? I’m curious what the numbers look like with ticket sales, parking passes, concessions/apparel sales. I’m sure a coaching salary can be darn near covered after one home game.

3) How the hell can Purdue afford to pay Jeff Brohm $6.6 million per year?!?
Coaches salaries have increased with the money that the new TV contracts are bringing in. The Big 10 is giving each conference school that gets a full share over $50 million a year. That is how Purdue can afford to pay Brohm his salary, without the tv money, the salaries for coaches would shrink.

The NFL dwarfs what college teams are bring in yearly, even teams like Texas and Alabama cannot come close to matching what teams like the Packers and Cowboys make yearly.

https://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/062515/how-nfl-makes-money.asp
 

SEIOWA CLONE

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Dec 19, 2018
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This isn't on you, but I'm sick of hearing "the market" requires things. Why do leaving CEOs get golden parachutes? Well, "the market" demands it. But the economy is built to serve people, not the other way around. If everyone just stopped then "the market" would stop.

All in all, I actually think college coaches have a more stressful job than NFL coaches. NFL coaches don't spend their entire existence away from their family recruiting.
That is what the masters of the free market system want you to think, in reality, we have a crony capitalism system, set up 40 years under Reagan's "trickle down economics" that rewards the wealthy by lowering taxes, getting rid of government barriers, and eliminating competition through meargers. The wealthy and the our "elected" officals, have set up a Quid Pro Quo, where the wealthy provide the funding for the candidate to run for office, and in return, the elected offical, will provide the above mentioned things to the wealthy and corporations.

Look at the stock market, its at record highes and has been increasing for years, but why has that not trickled down to the middle class? 90% of the stock on the market is owned by the top 10% of the people. For those that say, "look at my 401k", great, but if you take it out before age 59.5 you are taxed at 20% plus a 10% penalty, while the stock owner can sell his shares and pay around 15% to 20% depending on your income, with no penalty.
 
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Dandy

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Oct 11, 2012
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From time to time I sit back and wonder why we throw insane amounts of money at coaches and athletes of a sport. They're good at throwing and kicking leather balls while attempting to abide by a specific set of made up rules. Or they're good at showing other people how to throw and kick better than the opponent.
 

CYTUTT

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Nov 25, 2012
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That is what the masters of the free market system want you to think, in reality, we have a crony capitalism system, set up 40 years under Reagan's "trickle down economics" that rewards the wealthy by lowering taxes, getting rid of government barriers, and eliminating competition through meargers. The wealthy and the our "elected" officals, have set up a Quid Pro Quo, where the wealthy provide the funding for the candidate to run for office, and in return, the elected offical, will provide the above mentioned things to the wealthy and corporations.

Look at the stock market, its at record highes and has been increasing for years, but why has that not trickled down to the middle class? 90% of the stock on the market is owned by the top 10% of the people. For those that say, "look at my 401k", great, but if you take it out before age 59.5 you are taxed at 20% plus a 10% penalty, while the stock owner can sell his shares and pay around 15% to 20% depending on your income, with no penalty.
I can see your point, but I think both parties like the system, or they would change it. You paint too broad of a stroke to make your conclusion. There are a lot of varying factors that account for the distance between the haves and the have nots. The influence of technology and the fact that education is “worth” any price are just a couple. Problems we need to fix have to be dealt with sooner - the world changes faster than we can get ahead of it.
 

VeloClone

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Jan 19, 2010
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That is what the masters of the free market system want you to think, in reality, we have a crony capitalism system, set up 40 years under Reagan's "trickle down economics" that rewards the wealthy by lowering taxes, getting rid of government barriers, and eliminating competition through meargers. The wealthy and the our "elected" officals, have set up a Quid Pro Quo, where the wealthy provide the funding for the candidate to run for office, and in return, the elected offical, will provide the above mentioned things to the wealthy and corporations.

Look at the stock market, its at record highes and has been increasing for years, but why has that not trickled down to the middle class? 90% of the stock on the market is owned by the top 10% of the people. For those that say, "look at my 401k", great, but if you take it out before age 59.5 you are taxed at 20% plus a 10% penalty, while the stock owner can sell his shares and pay around 15% to 20% depending on your income, with no penalty.
Take this to the cave. If you want to talk about coaches salaries, great. But if you want to talk about politics and economic policies that is cave fodder.
 

VeloClone

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Jan 19, 2010
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From time to time I sit back and wonder why we throw insane amounts of money at coaches and athletes of a sport. They're good at throwing and kicking leather balls while attempting to abide by a specific set of made up rules. Or they're good at showing other people how to throw and kick better than the opponent.
If people stopped going to games and stopped watching games the money would dry up. As it stands, they have talents that the public has interest in seeing so they are going to command more money.
 

c.y.c.l.o.n.e.s

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Feb 21, 2007
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Just looked at ticket prices in New Orleans for the playoff game between the Vikings and Saints. Worst seats in the house are selling for $150 for a single seat and the best are selling for as much as $8000. Huge TV contracts have already been mentioned in this thread. Personally, I think the NFL has priced me out of seeing a game live. I just can't justify spending that kind of money to go watch a game but as long as people are willing to pay that much money, salaries for coaches and players will continue to rise.
 

besserheimerphat

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Apr 11, 2006
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Just looked at ticket prices in New Orleans for the playoff game between the Vikings and Saints. Worst seats in the house are selling for $150 for a single seat and the best are selling for as much as $8000. Huge TV contracts have already been mentioned in this thread. Personally, I think the NFL has priced me out of seeing a game live. I just can't justify spending that kind of money to go watch a game but as long as people are willing to pay that much money, salaries for coaches and players will continue to rise.
Is that the cost from the team or on the secondary market? I can't imagine the face value of a ticket being $8000 (though seat licenses, like donations for colleges, inflate the actual cost of admission).
 

c.y.c.l.o.n.e.s

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Dopey

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Nov 2, 2009
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Read through this article on ESPN and was surprised to learn just how much college coaches make compared to other state employees. Not saying they don’t deserve the money and not saying it should go to the players, but it is interesting that the highest paid employees are basketball or football coaches in 42 of the 50 states.

http://www.espn.com/espn/feature/st...d-state-employees&id=28261213&redirected=true

The three thoughts I had were:

1) College coaches are paid significantly more money over the last 10 years. For example, Saban was paid $3.1 million in 2009 compared to $8.9 million this year. He was the second highest paid coach in 2009 and 2019 in NCAA football. Is it conceivable to have $20 million a year contracts by 2029 at the current rate?

2) How much revenue does an elite college team generate vs a pro team on game days? I’m curious what the numbers look like with ticket sales, parking passes, concessions/apparel sales. I’m sure a coaching salary can be darn near covered after one home game.

3) How the hell can Purdue afford to pay Jeff Brohm $6.6 million per year?!?
I’m a bit surprised you were surprised.

I do agree with an earlier poster though. Doyle making $800k seems like nothing compared to most head coaches and coordinators. I’ll never touch a salary that large.
 

Dandy

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Oct 11, 2012
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Just looked at ticket prices in New Orleans for the playoff game between the Vikings and Saints. Worst seats in the house are selling for $150 for a single seat and the best are selling for as much as $8000. Huge TV contracts have already been mentioned in this thread. Personally, I think the NFL has priced me out of seeing a game live. I just can't justify spending that kind of money to go watch a game but as long as people are willing to pay that much money, salaries for coaches and players will continue to rise.
I'm a Chiefs fan and I thought going into the AFCCCG that we had a real shot so I casually looked at Super Bowl tickets. Minimum was over $3000 per ticket for the nose bleeds.
 

coyoteclone

Active Member
Jan 7, 2009
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That is what the masters of the free market system want you to think, in reality, we have a crony capitalism system, set up 40 years under Reagan's "trickle down economics" that rewards the wealthy by lowering taxes, getting rid of government barriers, and eliminating competition through meargers. The wealthy and the our "elected" officals, have set up a Quid Pro Quo, where the wealthy provide the funding for the candidate to run for office, and in return, the elected offical, will provide the above mentioned things to the wealthy and corporations.

Look at the stock market, its at record highes and has been increasing for years, but why has that not trickled down to the middle class? 90% of the stock on the market is owned by the top 10% of the people. For those that say, "look at my 401k", great, but if you take it out before age 59.5 you are taxed at 20% plus a 10% penalty, while the stock owner can sell his shares and pay around 15% to 20% depending on your income, with no penalty.
Maybe its time you find a better system......personally my 401K and IRA invested totally in the equity market for the last 40 years permitted me to retire at age 55 and since my company considered me a qualified retiree (7 on tax return), I paid no penalties for taking money out of those accounts.