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kcbob79clone

Well-Known Member
Just finished reading 'No Ordinary Dog' by Will Chesney about Cairo the military working dog that was on the Bin Laden Raid. Cairo and other dogs have incredible sense of smell. So incredible that they are used for cancer and diabetes screening. Now Helsinki airport is using dogs to sniff for Covid. An identified person then gets further testing. Their smell is so good that it is better than the PCR test.

 

simply1

Rec Center HOF
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Jun 10, 2009
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Pdx
Been a while since I flew United, generally prefer Delta due to some corporate perks on seat assignment. Hawaiian and Alaska Air to Hawaii are pretty good.
 

Cyforce

Well-Known Member
Nov 24, 2009
5,648
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Des Moines
Watched Max for the first time yesterday, great story. Was simply amazed at what they could train that dog to do.
 

madguy30

Well-Known Member
Nov 15, 2011
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Read a Twitter thread about this today and the question was posed: how would human life change if we had the same smell sensitivity as dogs? For one thing, adultery would be much more difficult.
Just senses in general. We'd be able to detect which people are safe to be around, and which aren't.

We had a dog that loved pretty much everyone except for one person, and looking back that person was really not very stable.
 
  • Agree
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AgronAlum

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2014
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Just senses in general. We'd be able to detect which people are safe to be around, and which aren't.

We had a dog that loved pretty much everyone except for one person, and looking back that person was really not very stable.
My wife and I were just having a conversation about what our dog would do if someone broke in. He’s friendly as hell to everyone but he meets everyone when he’s around us. He does this weird lunge thing when wrestling around with the kids but has never been aggressive. He’s only barked at one person and it was a dude that was working on the neighbors house that stuck his head over the fence.

He’s not aggressive but I Just have this feeling he would be if something was really going down. At 100+ pounds he could probably **** someone up if he wanted to.
 

kcbob79clone

Well-Known Member
Cats are better.
From iheartcats.com

Smell
On average, cats have 200 million smell receptors in their nostrils, which helps them locate prey and decipher the scent-based clues left behind for them by other cats in the form of urine marking and pheromones. Some dogs, like Bloodhounds for instance, have been specifically bred to have extraordinary senses of smell with around 300 million scent receptors! The average cat, however, still has a slightly sharper sense of smell than the average dog

Cats are better, they just don't care. We've had cats and dogs and we sum it up this way. Dogs think they are part of the family and want to please you so easily trained. Cats feel you are members of the staff and want you to please them.
 

1100011CS

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2007
13,454
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Marshalltown
From iheartcats.com

Smell
On average, cats have 200 million smell receptors in their nostrils, which helps them locate prey and decipher the scent-based clues left behind for them by other cats in the form of urine marking and pheromones. Some dogs, like Bloodhounds for instance, have been specifically bred to have extraordinary senses of smell with around 300 million scent receptors! The average cat, however, still has a slightly sharper sense of smell than the average dog

Cats are better, they just don't care. We've had cats and dogs and we sum it up this way. Dogs think they are part of the family and want to please you so easily trained. Cats feel you are members of the staff and want you to please them.
I think iheartcats.com is fos.
 

madguy30

Well-Known Member
Nov 15, 2011
24,293
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My wife and I were just having a conversation about what our dog would do if someone broke in. He’s friendly as hell to everyone but he meets everyone when he’s around us. He does this weird lunge thing when wrestling around with the kids but has never been aggressive. He’s only barked at one person and it was a dude that was working on the neighbors house that stuck his head over the fence.

He’s not aggressive but I Just have this feeling he would be if something was really going down. At 100+ pounds he could probably **** someone up if he wanted to.
Yeah we had a little sheltie that was happy to see anyone but if it someone she knew was shady she'd really just cower and avoid them.
 

kcbob79clone

Well-Known Member
I think iheartcats.com is fos.
How about news.com.au referencing a study published in the Applied Animal Behaviour Science Journal

https://www.news.com.au/technology/...m/news-story/57b549f5a2f77399485412c696fdb84b

which states, "Cats have a more sensitive sense of smell than dogs". Here is a link to the abstract of the study which contains a link to the report on the entire study.