• Fanatics -

    Thank you for your patience today and welcome to the newest version of Cyclone Fanatic!

    Most of the changes we have made are very simple, but will greatly improve your user experience while visiting the website.

    We have upgraded our forum software to speed things up. Our homepage is much cleaner and should be even more mobile friendly than before.

    We appreciate your loyalty and are committed to not only keeping Cyclone Fanatic in tip-top shape, but continuing to build this community for the next decade and beyond.

    We ask that if you are experiences any glitches to let us know in this thread . Will will be diligently working on the site all day.

    Thanks again.

    Chris Williams - Publisher
Football

The Doc Spot: Injury report for season opener

By Chris Williams, CycloneFanatic.com Publisher

It’s new feature time fanatics.

I think that you’ll all this informative blog for the rest of the 2011 Iowa State football season, courtesy of the Iowa Clinic.

It’s the "Doc Spot."

Every week, I’ll send a series of questions to the Iowa Clinic and their experts in the field will answer questions about the status of your favorite Cyclones. Let’s get started with some analysis of wide receiver Darius Reynolds’ broken toe.

CF: Wide receiver Darius Reynolds broke his toe on Thursday, Aug. 18. He’s been in a cast ever sense. How long does it take for an athlete to fully recover from a broken toe? Any chance that he’ll be 100 percent on Saturday?

Dr: Eric Barp (foot & ankle surgeon) says:

"Darius will not likely be 100 percent on Saturday.  It typically will take a good month for a toe fracture to heal but modifications can be made to his shoe to stabilize the fracture allowing him to play sparingly and if needed in certain game time situations."

Dr

CF: All Big 12 linebacker Jake Knott broke the ulna bone in his right arm last April. Since then, the coaches have been taking it easy on him during fall camp. Are they coaches being precautionary? What are the chances that he’ll re-injure that arm?

Des Moines Orthopaedic Surgeon, Dr. Nicholas Honkamp says:

“Although most fractures undergo significant healing in the first 6-8 weeks after injury, the bone can often take up to 6 months to fully heal. In addition, the muscles in the forearm also become weak due to the injury and lack of full activity while the bone  is healing. So the coaches are likely being a bit precautionary but are also easing him back into practice to allow his arm to fully strengthen back up.  Once the bone fully heals on x-ray, he should not be at any higher risk for re-fracture.”

Honkamp photo 243x350