Woodworkers Thread

mfl3cy

New Member
Sep 9, 2021
15
4
3
51
Pleasant Hill
I found a video online of how to make homemade "board butter". Melt 5 parts mineral oil and 1 part bees wax (all food grade). Let it cool and solidify. Rub on liberally, let it set overnight & buff off.

I used to only do a mineral oil soak, but I started using the board butter option. I usually do a final 'wet' buffing with the board butter and 2000-4000 grit pad. I have made number of boards, but most are live edge or a simple pattern. (I need more bees wax. Hoping to get some locally.)

Love what you did!
 
  • Like
Reactions: wintersmd

JM4CY

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Aug 23, 2012
22,066
39,740
113
America
Starting to finish up my moms kitchen face lift. She had golden oak cabinets that were still in great shape. I distressed them with black glazing, changed out the cabinet hardware, added a new sink, back splash, and range hood. The counter top is an epoxy dirty pour using diamond dust, pearl dust, white, silver and black metallic powder. Turned out pretty nice.
View attachment 93590
View attachment 93591 View attachment 93592
Do you want your mom to electrocute herself?!?!? ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: wintersmd

CyJeans

Well-Known Member
Apr 18, 2017
2,343
2,836
113
Beaverdale, IA
Anyone have tips for setting up dust collection system?

It all depends on what you are hooking up to it, how crazy you want to get, and how much money you are willing to spend. I have yet to take the plunge and rig up my shop but I have done a lot of research.

For table saws, jointers, planers, and miter saws you want a higher cfm rating and as large as possible sized ducting to handle all of these machines. You won't be able to get a high enough cfm rating along from a shop vac. For sanders or smaller tools you will want a good shop vac with a regular sized hose. The smaller hose and increased suction does better for fine dust.

As far as ducting goes, PVC is a cheap alternative to metal tubing. Ignore the warnings on the static causing an explosion, it is not a real thing. You will probably want to ground it though to avoid getting shocked every time you are near it. Blast gates are important too, make sure you map out your flow and have them at every T. If you want to get crazy with it you can buy automatic ones or make them yourself (saw a video on this of someone much smarter than me). If you are using a dust collector, start off with as big of a tube as your system will allow. Keep that main trunk going for as long as you can before it T's off without any bends. As you T off that's when you want to reduce down to smaller sizes for tubes (6" main duct down to 4" for a tool). Use rigid tubing as long as you can to the tool before switching to flexible hose. Because of the shape of flexible hose it creates turbulent air and causes cfm loss. Seal every joint with tape as well. Limit sharp corners, use two 45 bends where able to make a bigger sweeping curve.

Finally, again I have yet to do this myself but floor sweeps are handy. Put magnets on the inside though to catch any screws or metal that would damage your dust collector.

Yes I am an engineer and yes I have too much time on my hands.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AgronAlum

JM4CY

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Aug 23, 2012
22,066
39,740
113
America
It all depends on what you are hooking up to it, how crazy you want to get, and how much money you are willing to spend. I have yet to take the plunge and rig up my shop but I have done a lot of research.

For table saws, jointers, planers, and miter saws you want a higher cfm rating and as large as possible sized ducting to handle all of these machines. You won't be able to get a high enough cfm rating along from a shop vac. For sanders or smaller tools you will want a good shop vac with a regular sized hose. The smaller hose and increased suction does better for fine dust.

As far as ducting goes, PVC is a cheap alternative to metal tubing. Ignore the warnings on the static causing an explosion, it is not a real thing. You will probably want to ground it though to avoid getting shocked every time you are near it. Blast gates are important too, make sure you map out your flow and have them at every T. If you want to get crazy with it you can buy automatic ones or make them yourself (saw a video on this of someone much smarter than me). If you are using a dust collector, start off with as big of a tube as your system will allow. Keep that main trunk going for as long as you can before it T's off without any bends. As you T off that's when you want to reduce down to smaller sizes for tubes (6" main duct down to 4" for a tool). Use rigid tubing as long as you can to the tool before switching to flexible hose. Because of the shape of flexible hose it creates turbulent air and causes cfm loss. Seal every joint with tape as well. Limit sharp corners, use two 45 bends where able to make a bigger sweeping curve.

Finally, again I have yet to do this myself but floor sweeps are handy. Put magnets on the inside though to catch any screws or metal that would damage your dust collector.

Yes I am an engineer and yes I have too much time on my hands.
Wow. Wanna come hook up my garage then with all that free time? ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: mfl3cy

AgronAlum

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2014
4,172
5,272
113
What are everyone’s thoughts on Steel City table saws? I’ve told myself I can get by without a table saw but I know someone that’s selling one of their cabinet saws. Not sure on a price yet.
 

BWRhasnoAC

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Apr 10, 2013
17,791
13,904
113
Dez Moy Nez
A lot of glue! Ran everything through my jointer & planer for the first glue-up to get the tightest joints possible.

Took a bunch of time with featherboards (table saw) for the angled cuts to get as tight of joints as possible again. Overall, I'm pretty happy with how the joints turned out.

I felt the amount of surface area for the glue didn't require any biscuits, dowels etc.
I could tell that was a professional board. The pattern makes for an awesome 3d affect. Sounds like you have my dream shop.
 

CysDoc

Active Member
Mar 11, 2009
174
40
28
The bad area of the state.
It all depends on what you are hooking up to it, how crazy you want to get, and how much money you are willing to spend. I have yet to take the plunge and rig up my shop but I have done a lot of research.

For table saws, jointers, planers, and miter saws you want a higher cfm rating and as large as possible sized ducting to handle all of these machines. You won't be able to get a high enough cfm rating along from a shop vac. For sanders or smaller tools you will want a good shop vac with a regular sized hose. The smaller hose and increased suction does better for fine dust.

As far as ducting goes, PVC is a cheap alternative to metal tubing. Ignore the warnings on the static causing an explosion, it is not a real thing. You will probably want to ground it though to avoid getting shocked every time you are near it. Blast gates are important too, make sure you map out your flow and have them at every T. If you want to get crazy with it you can buy automatic ones or make them yourself (saw a video on this of someone much smarter than me). If you are using a dust collector, start off with as big of a tube as your system will allow. Keep that main trunk going for as long as you can before it T's off without any bends. As you T off that's when you want to reduce down to smaller sizes for tubes (6" main duct down to 4" for a tool). Use rigid tubing as long as you can to the tool before switching to flexible hose. Because of the shape of flexible hose it creates turbulent air and causes cfm loss. Seal every joint with tape as well. Limit sharp corners, use two 45 bends where able to make a bigger sweeping curve.

Finally, again I have yet to do this myself but floor sweeps are handy. Put magnets on the inside though to catch any screws or metal that would damage your dust collector.

Yes I am an engineer and yes I have too much time on my hands.
Thanks. That was great and yes you sound like an engineer (my brother is one too), but that's why we have you guys around right so we can get the proper research and way to do something and then we can ignore it and do how we want anyway. :)

Seriously, great info.
 

swiacy

Well-Known Member
Apr 9, 2009
1,060
535
113
It all depends on what you are hooking up to it, how crazy you want to get, and how much money you are willing to spend. I have yet to take the plunge and rig up my shop but I have done a lot of research.

For table saws, jointers, planers, and miter saws you want a higher cfm rating and as large as possible sized ducting to handle all of these machines. You won't be able to get a high enough cfm rating along from a shop vac. For sanders or smaller tools you will want a good shop vac with a regular sized hose. The smaller hose and increased suction does better for fine dust.

As far as ducting goes, PVC is a cheap alternative to metal tubing. Ignore the warnings on the static causing an explosion, it is not a real thing. You will probably want to ground it though to avoid getting shocked every time you are near it. Blast gates are important too, make sure you map out your flow and have them at every T. If you want to get crazy with it you can buy automatic ones or make them yourself (saw a video on this of someone much smarter than me). If you are using a dust collector, start off with as big of a tube as your system will allow. Keep that main trunk going for as long as you can before it T's off without any bends. As you T off that's when you want to reduce down to smaller sizes for tubes (6" main duct down to 4" for a tool). Use rigid tubing as long as you can to the tool before switching to flexible hose. Because of the shape of flexible hose it creates turbulent air and causes cfm loss. Seal every joint with tape as well. Limit sharp corners, use two 45 bends where able to make a bigger sweeping curve.

Finally, again I have yet to do this myself but floor sweeps are handy. Put magnets on the inside though to catch any screws or metal that would damage your dust collector.

Yes I am an engineer and yes I have too much time on my hands.
We have a 75’x50’ shop and I do my wood work in a corner, the interior of the building is open. I have been looking for a power sweep to keep the floor clean. Primarily dirt and sawdust. Any suggestions?
 

CycloneBob

Well-Known Member
Aug 9, 2010
760
239
63
Ames
What are everyone’s thoughts on Steel City table saws? I’ve told myself I can get by without a table saw but I know someone that’s selling one of their cabinet saws. Not sure on a price yet.

FYI, I'm sure Steel City is out of business. They made good equipment, in fact I have their long bed 6" jointer.
 

mramseyISU

Well-Known Member
Nov 8, 2006
4,660
3,841
113
Waterloo, IA
I'm assuming it's similar to Woodsmith Store?
Pretty similar at least the ones I’ve been in before. If you live closer to Des Moines I wouldn’t probably make a special trip but for me it’s 45 minutes closer one way than driving to the woodsmith store.
 

wintersmd

Active Member
Jul 2, 2014
153
152
43
Didn’t see this discussed earlier but a Woodcraft just opened in Iowa City right next to Menards today. Might make the trip Sunday to check it out.
I seen they were getting one but didn't know when it opened. Used to shop in the Madison store. Pretty much like Woodsmith, but might be worth the trip if you have a free afternoon.
 

mramseyISU

Well-Known Member
Nov 8, 2006
4,660
3,841
113
Waterloo, IA
Here's a video walkthrough of the new Woodcraft store in case any of you are interested. Pretty similar to the Woodsmith Store but I think the hand tool selection is a little better if that's your thing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AgronAlum

Help Support Us

Become a patron