What's growing? The garden thread.

cydnote

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2023
413
842
93
Since my garden has been in the same place for upwards of thirty years, and I am pretty meticulous about keeping it weed free, I generally have very low weed pressure. Several gardeners I know abandon their gardens after harvest and let it go with the thought that they will just rototill at the end of the season which in effect assures them of reseeding the weeds for the following year making it a never ending battle. The one weed that I constantly battle though is Purslane. Much to my dismay, I just read an article lauding the benefits of growing purslane as a highly nutritious vegetable crop (completely edible and being the highest source of plant based Omega 3 fatty acids). Screw that! After battling it forever with everything from chemical warfare, flame throwers, .precision bombing, and sniper fire, I'll die unhealthy before I'll let it thrive in my garden let alone plant it! :):)
 

Chelseaczech

New Member
Jul 26, 2021
18
18
3
63
Since my garden has been in the same place for upwards of thirty years, and I am pretty meticulous about keeping it weed free, I generally have very low weed pressure. Several gardeners I know abandon their gardens after harvest and let it go with the thought that they will just rototill at the end of the season which in effect assures them of reseeding the weeds for the following year making it a never ending battle. The one weed that I constantly battle though is Purslane. Much to my dismay, I just read an article lauding the benefits of growing purslane as a highly nutritious vegetable crop (completely edible and being the highest source of plant based Omega 3 fatty acids). Screw that! After battling it forever with everything from chemical warfare, flame throwers, .precision bombing, and sniper fire, I'll die unhealthy before I'll let it thrive in my garden let alone plant it! :):)
Purslane is from the devil. Preen seems to be effective but it really dings my peppers. You have to pull it by the roots and dispose of it or it will regrow. Hoe it and each piece will become a new plant. What's that monster from mythology that does that?
 

cydnote

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2023
413
842
93
Another update; The spinach finally succumbed to the heat so I rescued what was edible and pulled the plants. To this point I've been able to keep up to the harvest eating salads on an almost daily basis. This final harvest was however too large so it was cooked down and frozen. The bride has an excellent (but simple) recipe for "spinach balls" made with seasoned stuffing and frozen spinach that she flattens down before baking so they are more like warm cookies. Several friends that aren't particularly fans of spinach find themselves going back for seconds. The few beets that emerged from the first planting are now harvestable, but does anybody have a recipe to eat them? Other than pickled beets I don't know that I've eaten them any other way since I was a kid some 60 years ago. I like them pickled but can't make a meal of them. We tried them by halving/quartering them, tossing them in olive oil, and baking them and they were good. We left the caramelized skins on and it seemed like it added a twist to the taste. What's your method? I have a friend that enjoys the beet tops wilted in bacon grease (with onion?) but why wouldn't you? Since my heart attack my wife frowns on me eating anything that tastes good :):D) so i don't know if that is in the cards. Haven't tried robbing new potatoes yet but i know they are there for the taking. The tomatoes are setting fruit and the plants look healthy, probably aided by an application of fungicide so i must be fending off the blight even with all the rain and foggy mornings we have been experiencing lately.
How does your garden grow?
 

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