Rural water rate increase?

ISUTex

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May 25, 2012
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Rural U.S.A.
I am asking because I have no idea. How many livestock farmers use rural water? My parents use their well for their cattle (they have maybe a dozen head).
 

somecyguy

Well-Known Member
Jun 19, 2006
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If you are rural and own your land, can’t you drill your own well? Spend
$15-20k and get your own well and pressure system. Avoid those pesky $30 per month water bills.
I'd surprised if many people can get a well drilled (plus the tank installed etc) for $20K these days. I had a new well and tank installed in 2018 and mine was 25K. Most of my neighbors since have been higher still. That's paying years of utility bills up front.
 

Bipolarcy

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Oct 27, 2008
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Unfortunately, city government is often a product of its voters as well. People don't want to pay more so they're happy when the city is putting off repairs when all they hear is their taxes aren't going up. Eventually someone ends up holding the bag. Its also possible the reason the rates havent gone back down is that they are now doing that regular maintenance and that is taking that additional money, but it may prevent those kinds of jumps in the future.

Happens a lot of times with HOAs too. Far too many have too little in reserve (especially newer HOAs that are still in good condition and repairs seem like a distant problem) and aren't banking away money for things like roof and pavement repairs, leaving whoever lives there when repairs become unavoidable with a large assessment to make up for what should have been smaller more regular dues payments building up reserves in the years/decades prior.
They haven't fixed all the problems yet. That's why they're still raising water rates.
 

Sparkplug

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Oct 9, 2008
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Central Iowa
I am asking because I have no idea. How many livestock farmers use rural water? My parents use their well for their cattle (they have maybe a dozen head).
Cousins have had to the last few years. Rural water called the day they opened it up last summer to be sure there wasn’t a leak
 

NWICY

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Sep 2, 2012
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Been getting water from these folks over 35 years. They have done an outstanding job keeping water affordable over the years. Projects have been completed on schedule and budget. Water quality is excellent. Service is great. Are existing well water was very hard and loaded with sulfer.

What bothers me more is the amount of water required for both ethanol production and data center cooling. These will become bigger and bigger factors as time goes on and will impact cost/availibility.
That carbon pipeline that Summit wants to build takes lots of water at the beginning of the process, not sure where it all gets used but is a bunch.
 
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NWICY

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Sep 2, 2012
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If you are rural and own your land, can’t you drill your own well? Spend
$15-20k and get your own well and pressure system. Avoid those pesky $30 per month water bills.
Meh, had a well before rural water went by, had it after, on 30+ years I've done the pressure tank and the box. Probably less than a grand total. Building new would probably hook onto RW but wasn't worth it since I've got a well.
 
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wxman1

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It doesn't directly affect me because I'm on well water, but Cedar Rapids recently announced that Google is building a data center near the airport. The city said they would be top 3 in water usage (mostly likely only behind ADM and Quaker Oats).

Google gets some tasty 20 year tax credits and the rest of the population gets utility increases.
International Paper is the second biggest user behind ADM. The treatment plant on the west side is almost exclusively there to serve the industrial customers on the south side.
 

do4CY

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Aug 30, 2020
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I am asking because I have no idea. How many livestock farmers use rural water? My parents use their well for their cattle (they have maybe a dozen head).
A lot of turkey growers use it so they don't have to treat well water. I don't think it's very common for pigs and cattle
 

Stormin

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Apr 11, 2006
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Actually no, I can't, but thanks for your input, condescending ass clown.

I know a professional well driller must be hired. But I thought if you owned an acreage that you could hire someone to drill your own well on your land with approval from county supervisors. Where is the acreage located that you can not do that. Please post your link.
 

IcSyU

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Nov 27, 2007
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Rochester, MN
I know a professional well driller must be hired. But I thought if you owned an acreage that you could hire someone to drill your own well on your land with approval from county supervisors. Where is the acreage located that you can not do that. Please post your link.
Being on rural water doesn't mean you necessarily live in a rural area. A ton of small towns are served by rural water and there are charters and covenants which prevent wells from being drilled at both the city/township level as well as the HOA level.

I know this is hard to stomach but you don't know everything about everything.
 

Stormin

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Apr 11, 2006
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Being on rural water doesn't mean you necessarily live in a rural area. A ton of small towns are served by rural water and there are charters and covenants which prevent wells from being drilled at both the city/township level as well as the HOA level.

I know this is hard to stomach but you don't know everything about everything.

Acreages not a part of HOA’s or small town incorporated areas then would be able to contract a well driller to drill their own well? HOA’s and City limits usually always have restrictions.

I am merely asking questions to determine whether there are limits in place for actual farm acreages. I do not know everything and do not claim to.

So when a person purchases any property they should be aware of their water sources and requirements. No matter where they live. And they likely accepted their water source restrictions when they purchased their property. Kind of like when you considered utility bills and such when trying to find a place to live.
 

wxman1

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Jul 2, 2008
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Cedar Rapids
Being on rural water doesn't mean you necessarily live in a rural area. A ton of small towns are served by rural water and there are charters and covenants which prevent wells from being drilled at both the city/township level as well as the HOA level.

I know this is hard to stomach but you don't know everything about everything.
Now you just sound like my wife.
 

CYEATHAWK

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Aug 26, 2007
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I am merely asking questions to determine whether there are limits in place for actual farm acreages.

By "merely asking" you mean like this.......

If you are rural and own your land, can’t you drill your own well? Spend
$15-20k and get your own well and pressure system. Avoid those pesky $30 per month water bills.

I think IcSyU is correct in observing that with that post you are being a.........



condescending ass clown.
 

BCClone

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Not exactly sure.
I'd surprised if many people can get a well drilled (plus the tank installed etc) for $20K these days. I had a new well and tank installed in 2018 and mine was 25K. Most of my neighbors since have been higher still. That's paying years of utility bills up front.
Depends on depth. If you sand point the well may be 7500. If you have to go 250-300, talking probably 10k. Maybe less if you don’t need high volume. Last I did was 40 gpm.
 

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