People are moving to the Midwest

NWICY

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Sep 2, 2012
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I’m trying a new product called Pivot-Bio on 250 acres of corn this year. It is placed on the seed and reacts with the microbes in the soil. The reaction then pulls N out of the atmosphere to feed the plant. Which is effectively free N which will replace N I would normally purchase in a pellet form and apply over the top of corn when it is about foot and a half tall. Environmentally safe with no chance of run off.
Could you please post how it did sometime after harvest? Did you run alternating strip or split the field?
 

NWICY

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seems like a lot of iowa state agronomy grads forgot the chapter on snake oil salesmen
Well sometimes you got to try things to see what works. As long as you don't get burned to often, it doesn't hurt to experiment. Lots of things get better after a decade or so of improvement.
 
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CYEATHAWK

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Not here lol.


I don't know why since this thread is nothing more than a.............

'environmental refugees from the South' who have an increasing need for housing."

Now that got my attention. I added to the list my two new neighbors who are from Arizona and California. My area does not often get over 90 degrees, has an abundance of groundwater, low taxes, no hurricanes, few tornadoes, no earthquakes, and crime is not a major issue. We have good roads, decent schools, wild areas, and a diverse economy. The northern half of WI is a target area for those moving out of the south. Big change from not many years ago when those moving South were envied!

This thread will probably get caved because facts are scary to a segment but yeah -the access to fresh water and relatively lower risk of severe weather is going to lead to more of this. However, I read last year that your area in particular is at a dramatically increased risk of wildfire due to a combination of factors. It seems medium and long-term foolish to rush into building out new development without doing the impact studies as you note.

Those who move north to avoid increasingly deadly heat and humidity.




Yep, states like Wisconsin and Michigan get top ratings as places to escape from climate change.

Honestly for the past 3 winters we have barely even had snow that sticks anymore in the lower half of the state. The UP is different but winters are getting very mild.

I think Michigan is a lot cloudier than points west, but they definitely get fewer tornadoes, wind storms, white out blizzards (more snow, but just not as stormy) and droughts.

Yep that’s been the trend for awhile. But those southern states are going to quickly become uninhabitable due to water in the west and heat/storms in the east.

Also insurance companies are finally getting smart and refusing to cover a lot more areas in the south. The shift won’t be immediate but within the next 5-10 years it will be very noticeable. It’s why you get a place now while it’s still cheap

The snow thing becomes problematic in different ways. Native pests don't get knocked down in population like they should (the Wisconsin ticks say HI!) and native trees need the cold I guess? We're having tree die-offs because of the mild winters. Which then in St. Clone's area..........increases the risk of wildfire.

I went to a gardening seminar earlier this year that was very hey this is happening, here's how to adapt. He said push back your gardening start date by a day every year and by....it must have been 2050 I think - my area will be something like 7a hardiness. It moved to 5a this year.

I’ve looked at some of the same plant zone stuff as well and it’s fascinating.

Yes we will likely have drought and high temps and an outbreak of fires. High forestland ground litter and decreased pulpwood logging are developing into a crisis in some of northern WI. Peshtigo?

Just have to deal with Canada on fire every summer and hope Northern Minnesota isn't next. Won't be as hot and you'll have water but you won't be immune to weather/climate issues.

Hence the "relative". I'm not sure anywhere is immune.


......climate change circle jerk anyway. And this is just the first 2 pages.
 

StClone

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Dec 17, 2009
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I don't know why since this thread is nothing more than a.............


























......climate change circle jerk anyway. And this is just the first 2 pages.
Sir, or madame, what are you talking about?

My city is seeing people move in from the South and my elected city officials are forced to take action. THEY HAVE ASCERTAINED that one of the causes is related to changing conditions in areas of the county where SOMETHING is going on making people leave their home state. In part to accommodate them they are forced to tear up my beautiful woodlot where my kids played, I birdwatched, and looked for mushrooms. Maybe this doesn't have anything to do with you or your lifestyle or beliefs but it is affecting mine!
 
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cydnote

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Sir, or madame, what are you talking about?

My city is seeing people move in from the South and my elected city officials are forced to take action. THEY HAVE ASCERTAINED that one of the causes is related to changing conditions in areas of the county where SOMETHING is going on making people leave their home state. In part to accommodate them they are forced to tear up my beautiful woodlot where my kids played, I birdwatched, and looked for mushrooms. Maybe this doesn't have anything to do with you or your lifestyle or beliefs but it is affecting mine!
Grab those oyster mushrooms while you still can--they're prolific around here right now
 

swiacy

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Could you please post how it did sometime after harvest? Did you run alternating strip or split the field?
432 crop acre field. Started with hopper filled for 250 acres treated, rest of field untreated and will not topdress untreated. Have test strip side by side in another field. It was planted early April and had water pooled on it so it may not be a good test. From 4/15 thru 5/30 we had rain two or three times a week. As I tell my son: Welcome to Farming.
 
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Peter

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Feb 21, 2010
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Had people up from Texas for a graduation a couple weeks back and they could t believe how green Wisconsin was. I was asked multiple times what kind of irrigation system I used in my backyard. I’m like, “the water just comes out of the sky here,” which seemed to blow their minds.
 

madguy30

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Nov 15, 2011
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Sir, or madame, what are you talking about?

My city is seeing people move in from the South and my elected city officials are forced to take action. THEY HAVE ASCERTAINED that one of the causes is related to changing conditions in areas of the county where SOMETHING is going on making people leave their home state. In part to accommodate them they are forced to tear up my beautiful woodlot where my kids played, I birdwatched, and looked for mushrooms. Maybe this doesn't have anything to do with you or your lifestyle or beliefs but it is affecting mine!

People in Colorado: There's been more fires lately including east of the front range (this happened near Boulder a couple of summers ago) and with it being so dry (and expensive), we may move to cheaper places where it's less likely to happen.

CYEATHAWK: what a circle jerk!! Why are people obsessing over it!?

Proceeds to comb through the thread to point out mere mentions of influencing patterns.



**Mods, feel free to delete this but it's interesting seeing people interject their own leanings into the thread by acting like they aren't lighting the fuse.
 

Rabbuk

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Mar 1, 2011
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People in Colorado: There's been more fires lately including east of the front range (this happened near Boulder a couple of summers ago) and with it being so dry (and expensive), we may move to cheaper places where it's less likely to happen.

CYEATHAWK: what a circle jerk!! Why are people obsessing over it!?

Proceeds to comb through the thread to point out mere mentions of influencing patterns.



**Mods, feel free to delete this but it's interesting seeing people interject their own leanings into the thread by acting like they aren't lighting the fuse.
It is a shame one side likes to always get things caved.
 
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cydnote

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Had people up from Texas for a graduation a couple weeks back and they could t believe how green Wisconsin was. I was asked multiple times what kind of irrigation system I used in my backyard. I’m like, “the water just comes out of the sky here,” which seemed to blow their minds.
Sometimes we get so comfortable in our own environment we don't realize how blessed we are. I was once offered a job as a district sales rep for a major seed company that encompassed the greater part of western Kansas, most of which was under center pivot irrigation. When I learned that I wouldn't have the need for a lawn mower it didn't take me long to decide I wouldn't be a good fit for the position (or more so that the position wouldn't be a good fit for me)
 
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besserheimerphat

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I think there are a lot of (currently) dying/depressed towns in the lakes/northwoods/mining country of those two states, as well as Minnesota that would offer cheap property and relative immunity from climate change.
"Immunity" maybe in the fact that the climate issues won't be as severe, but the infrastructure may struggle to keep up with increased population.
 

Turn2

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Clusterfunkeny
432 crop acre field. Started with hopper filled for 250 acres treated, rest of field untreated and will not topdress untreated. Have test strip side by side in another field. It was planted early April and had water pooled on it so it may not be a good test. From 4/15 thru 5/30 we had rain two or three times a week. As I tell my son: Welcome to Farming.
Not to throw any more OT into the thread, but don't forget it's $/A you are after, not Bu/A. I really wish there more threads dedicated to stuff like this, but people seem to get their feels wadded up so easily.
 
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FriendlySpartan

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"Immunity" maybe in the fact that the climate issues won't be as severe, but the infrastructure may struggle to keep up with increased population.
That would take awhile, a lot of the infrastructure was created with much larger populations in mind. Valid point though
 

Turn2

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Clusterfunkeny
Interesting part of it is, they tell you to NOT cut your N rate.
Very few of these types of products will show an advantage in what is already a high N (prairie soils) environment.

 
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swiacy

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Not to throw any more OT into the thread, but don't forget it's $/A you are after, not Bu/A. I really wish there more threads dedicated to stuff like this, but people seem to get their feels wadded up so easily.
If you were lucky or unlucky to be part of agriculture during the Farm Crisis of the ‘80’s like I was, if you didn’t understand the object was $/A…..you made an early exit. And as time went on, even if you did, you still struggled. It accelerated the demise of businesses in rural towns because farmers went several years without buying anything but food. So yeah I know it’s $/A and I agree that the Ag industry including Universities promote yield but that’s how they make more money. PivotBio was presented to me as reducing the need to add purchasing extra N by side dressing. The cost is slightly less but eliminates a trip, running over corn and adding commercial N that might end up as run off. I’m skeptical but in 1974 I had the first Vermeer Big Baler in the region and everybody told me it was a crazy idea that would never work.
 
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cydnote

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If you were lucky or unlucky to be part of agriculture during the Farm Crisis of the ‘80’s like I was, if you didn’t understand the object was $/A…..you made an early exit. And as time went on, even if you did, you still struggled. It accelerated the demise of businesses in rural towns because farmers went several years without buying anything but food. So yeah I know it’s $/A and I agree that the Ag industry including Universities promote yield but that’s how they make more money. PivotBio was presented to me as reducing the need to add purchasing extra N by side dressing. The cost is slightly less but eliminates a trip, running over corn and adding commercial N that might end up as run off. I’m skeptical but in 1974 I had the first Vermeer Big Baler in the region and everybody told me it was a crazy idea that would never work.
In my area, side dressing went out the door when nitrogen prices escalated and the extra trip money was used to supplement more nitrogen on original application and therefore created the advent of N-Serve and other nitrogen stabilizer products. The only side dressing that occurs around here is to fix unanticipated problems--not as a part of an original plan. I can't remember the ag industries or universities pushing the use of extra N without including the cost of an extra trip, thus using ROI as a selling point, not just a yield advantage. outside of that, any yield advantage talk in the industry is based on genetic advantage of one hybrid over another.