People are moving to the Midwest

FriendlySpartan

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That seems strange in light of the fact that Southern states are growing their populations the fastest.

Yep that’s been the trend for awhile. But those southern states are going to quickly become uninhabitable due to water in the west and heat/storms in the east.

Also insurance companies are finally getting smart and refusing to cover a lot more areas in the south. The shift won’t be immediate but within the next 5-10 years it will be very noticeable. It’s why you get a place now while it’s still cheap
 

cowgirl836

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Honestly for the past 3 winters we have barely even had snow that sticks anymore in the lower half of the state. The UP is different but winters are getting very mild.

The snow thing becomes problematic in different ways. Native pests don't get knocked down in population like they should (the Wisconsin ticks say HI!) and native trees need the cold I guess? We're having tree die-offs because of the mild winters. Which then in St. Clone's area..........increases the risk of wildfire.

I went to a gardening seminar earlier this year that was very hey this is happening, here's how to adapt. He said push back your gardening start date by a day every year and by....it must have been 2050 I think - my area will be something like 7a hardiness. It moved to 5a this year.
 

pourcyne

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Iowa now has the 2nd highest cancer rate in the country. Not sure that is a midwest draw though?

Part of that is definitely age-related. Iowa's average age is pushing 40.

Once folks hit 40, the cancer rate nearly triples by the time they're 54.
 

StClone

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I’m seeing like 5 anecdotal incidences of people moving to the Midwest in here. Tbf the thread title just says “people are moving to the Midwest” which of course is true. A **** ton of people are also moving out of the Midwest.
My Alderperson is a professional responding to a need seeing the pressure of an influx of people out of the South. Anecdotal? I don't think that is accurate in this situation.
 

nhclone

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I’m seeing like 5 anecdotal incidences of people moving to the Midwest in here. Tbf the thread title just says “people are moving to the Midwest” which of course is true. A **** ton of people are also moving out of the Midwest.

Also, I don’t count Ohio or Michigan as the “Midwest” despite all the blah blah blah government this, official definition that about it. They are in the Mideast on my map. Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, WV, Kentucky.
Census Bureau estimates from July 2022 - July 2023 show every midwest state growing (albeit slowly) with the exception of Illinois. Quite a bit different than the previous year that had Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, and Kansas all losing population. Be interesting to see if the trend continues.
 

coolerifyoudid

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Yep that’s been the trend for awhile. But those southern states are going to quickly become uninhabitable due to water in the west and heat/storms in the east.

Also insurance companies are finally getting smart and refusing to cover a lot more areas in the south. The shift won’t be immediate but within the next 5-10 years it will be very noticeable. It’s why you get a place now while it’s still cheap
I recently watched a documentary confirming what you're talking about. I think it was called Furiosa.
 
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Cyclonepride

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Yep that’s been the trend for awhile. But those southern states are going to quickly become uninhabitable due to water in the west and heat/storms in the east.

Also insurance companies are finally getting smart and refusing to cover a lot more areas in the south. The shift won’t be immediate but within the next 5-10 years it will be very noticeable. It’s why you get a place now while it’s still cheap
Call me skeptical on that.
 

BoxsterCy

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Yep, states like Wisconsin and Michigan get top ratings as places to escape from climate change.

We just bought over 500 acres in mid/upper lower peninsula as an investment. Land is still insanely cheap for now.

Neighbor's wife unexpended divorced him and took half of everything which turned his retirement planning upside down. He's a doctor that specializes in spinal pain issues. He's 60-something so looking to recoup lost dollars before retirement and got an offer from a more rural area in Michigan that's well in excess of his Twin Cities pay and that, coupled with way cheaper housing, is where he is likely headed.
 

Gunnerclone

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The snow thing becomes problematic in different ways. Native pests don't get knocked down in population like they should (the Wisconsin ticks say HI!) and native trees need the cold I guess? We're having tree die-offs because of the mild winters. Which then in St. Clone's area..........increases the risk of wildfire.

I went to a gardening seminar earlier this year that was very hey this is happening, here's how to adapt. He said push back your gardening start date by a day every year and by....it must have been 2050 I think - my area will be something like 7a hardiness. It moved to 5a this year.

I’ve looked at some of the same plant zone stuff as well and it’s fascinating.
 

Al_4_State

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Part of that is definitely age-related. Iowa's average age is pushing 40.

Once folks hit 40, the cancer rate nearly triples by the time they're 54.
Not only is it age related, but didn't Iowa get a ton of nuclear fall out via rain in the early 60's and the people of that specific demographic who lived in northern Iowa and southern Minnesota at that time wildly outpace cancer rates for their cohort nationally?



 
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StClone

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The snow thing becomes problematic in different ways. Native pests don't get knocked down in population like they should (the Wisconsin ticks say HI!) and native trees need the cold I guess? We're having tree die-offs because of the mild winters. Which then in St. Clone's area..........increases the risk of wildfire.

I went to a gardening seminar earlier this year that was very hey this is happening, here's how to adapt. He said push back your gardening start date by a day every year and by....it must have been 2050 I think - my area will be something like 7a hardiness. It moved to 5a this year.
Yes we will likely have drought and high temps and an outbreak of fires. High forestland ground litter and decreased pulpwood logging are developing into a crisis in some of northern WI. Peshtigo?
 
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BoxsterCy

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I think there are a lot of (currently) dying/depressed towns in the lakes/northwoods/mining country of those two states, as well as Minnesota that would offer cheap property and relative immunity from climate change.

Just have to deal with Canada on fire every summer and hope Northern Minnesota isn't next. Won't be as hot and you'll have water but you won't be immune to weather/climate issues.
 

JEFF420

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I think Michigan is a lot cloudier than points west, but they definitely get fewer tornadoes, wind storms, white out blizzards (more snow, but just not as stormy) and droughts.
cloudy yes. but the lack of wind will make you think you are 9 doobies deep.... MY HOUSE DOESNT HAVE AC
 
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madguy30

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This thread will probably get caved because facts are scary to a segment but yeah -the access to fresh water and relatively lower risk of severe weather is going to lead to more of this. However, I read last year that your area in particular is at a dramatically increased risk of wildfire due to a combination of factors. It seems medium and long-term foolish to rush into building out new development without doing the impact studies as you note.

I'm trying to get my time up north in before the Superior areas become the new CO front range...full of people from the front range.

It's only busier and busier and louder every time I go it seems.
 
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StClone

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My Alderperson is a professional responding to a need seeing the pressure of an influx of people out of the South. Anecdotal? I don't think that is accurate in this situation.
On edit: I was surprised too that my area is gaining population from the south. As I said it was always people moving south from here, but there may be a blip of a reverse trend.