"Next" Saturday

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Say today is Sunday, Jan 15th. What day is "next Saturday"

  • "This Saturday" and "Next Saturday" in this case are the same = Jan 21st

  • "This Saturday" = Jan 21st, "Next Saturday" = Jan 28th


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Agclone91

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Feb 5, 2011
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So, to clarify, for those of you who took the second option:

On Sunday the 15th, you would not refer to the next Saturday (the 21st) as "next Saturday?" You would refer the next Saturday after the next Saturday (the 28th) as "next Saturday?"
Correct, because on the 15th the 21st becomes this Saturday, not next Saturday.
 

2speedy1

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Jan 4, 2014
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So, to clarify, for those of you who took the second option:

On Sunday the 15th, you would not refer to the next Saturday (the 21st) as "next Saturday?" You would refer the next Saturday after the next Saturday (the 28th) as "next Saturday?"
This I think comes into, people talk in weekends. So once you start the week.. (yes technically it starts on Sunday...but thats dumb, the week really starts Monday) It switches.

So its more like this weekend, and next weekend.....and that changes once you go beyond the current weekend.
 
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Cycsk

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Correct, because on the 15th the 21st is now this Saturday, not next Saturday.


OK. Now I have to conclude that I can't trust the English language if 2/3 of you never refer to the next Saturday as "next Saturday."

I know the first option is squishy (if the 21st is "next Saturday," then when does it become "this Saturday'), but at least we can refer to the next Saturday as "next Saturday." The rest of you never do.
 
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8bitnes

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Nov 21, 2010
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The question "what's going on Saturday?" would work in both cases.

From that baseline, your unnecessary addition of the word "this" causes no problems. You are not wrong.

Her unnecessary addition of the word "next" creates confusion. She believes she is not wrong. Choose your battles
 

8bitnes

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Nov 21, 2010
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OK. Now I have to conclude that I can't trust the English language if 2/3 of you never refer to the next Saturday as "next Saturday."

I know the first option is squishy (if the 21st is "next Saturday," then when does it become "this Saturday'), but at least we can refer to the next Saturday as "next Saturday." The rest of you never do.
There is a difference between
"Next Saturday" and "the next Saturday"

The former often means the one approaching and the latter often means the Saturday after the former
 

Gorm

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Conversation on any day of the week not Saturday = "This Saturday."

Conversation on Saturday itself= "Next Saturday."
 

ISUcyclones11

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Dec 11, 2014
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So this Saturday is the last Saturday? Read the question:

SAY TODAY IS SUNDAY, JAN 15TH. WHAT DAY IS "NEXT SATURDAY"​


Sunday is the only day where they are the same

Monday-Wednesday = This Saturday. Thursday = "Saturday", Friday ="tomorrow"

On Monday, "next Saturday" means two Saturdays from now aka 12 days later.
 

NickTheGreat

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If you are waiting in line for a cashier, and the cashier says "Next" and the guy behind me goes in front of me I'd be mad. "Next" should mean immediately following.

I'll admit I'd probably assume most people mean the 21st, but it should be the 14th. Much like how we've corrupted the language for "literally" everything.

I would personally say "Saturday" or "the next Saturday" to differentiate, which all seems fairly clear.
 
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SayMyName

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Jan 28, 2017
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I submit:

"This" & "THE Next" = immediately upcoming

"Next" = after, following




*the use of THE being licensed & trademarked by tOSU, of course
 
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BobTheHawkHater

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Jan 21, 2008
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This Saturday = Jan 14
Next Saturday = Jan 21

Even your poll is incorrect
I purposely set the starting point on a Sunday (Jan 15th) in the poll question to cover the extreme case.
Somewhere in the middle of the week my mind flips over to match what most people are agreeing on here.

So if today is Sunday Jan 15th, "this Saturday" and "next Saturday" are both the 21st.
If today is Friday Jan 20th, "this Saturday" is the 21st and "next Saturday" is the 28th.
I'm not sure in my subconscious mind where the flip-over point is.
 
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TrailCy

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Mar 3, 2021
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Please help me settle an ongoing argument with my in-laws.

We're at the game last night (Tuesday) and the wife asks me something about what's going on "next Saturday". I say, "you mean 'this Saturday', right?" and we go down our standard argument about "this" vs "next" Saturday and her brother chimes in on her side to tell me what an idiot I am.

I'm not talking about "this coming Saturday" or any other qualifiers like that. Strictly, "next Saturday".

If we were sitting on Friday, then yes, logically I could see "this Saturday" would be the next day and "next Saturday" would be 8 days from now, but I'm talking the extreme case of today being a Sunday, so the closet Saturday is 6 days away.

"next" means the nearest upcoming event.

so "next saturday" means the nearest upcoming saturday.

but... "this saturday means the same thing. just ask for clarification - no one is right or wrong.

it's like when people say "it's quarter of 5" when meaning 4:45 PM.
 
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NebraskaCY

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On a Sunday, since you are still in the "this weekend", then "next Saturday", would be a part of the next weekend. Once you are out of the weekend, then option "B" would be correct.
 

BobTheHawkHater

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Jan 21, 2008
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On a Sunday, since you are still in the "this weekend", then "next Saturday", would be a part of the next weekend. Once you are out of the weekend, then option "B" would be correct.
Don't get hung up on the weekend part then. What if the poll were changed to:

SAY TODAY IS WED, JAN 18TH. WHAT DAY IS "NEXT TUESDAY"​

  1. "This Tuesday" and "Next Tuesday" in this case are the same = Jan 24th
  2. "This Tuesday" = Jan 24th, "Next Tuesday" = Jan 31st
 

NebraskaCY

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Don't get hung up on the weekend part then. What if the poll were changed to:

SAY TODAY IS WED, JAN 18TH. WHAT DAY IS "NEXT TUESDAY"​

  1. "This Tuesday" and "Next Tuesday" in this case are the same = Jan 24th
  2. "This Tuesday" = Jan 24th, "Next Tuesday" = Jan 31st
Option 2 is the correct response. "This" is the closest day and "next" refers to 2 iterations from current day.
 
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agrabes

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Oct 25, 2006
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Don't get hung up on the weekend part then. What if the poll were changed to:

SAY TODAY IS WED, JAN 18TH. WHAT DAY IS "NEXT TUESDAY"​

  1. "This Tuesday" and "Next Tuesday" in this case are the same = Jan 24th
  2. "This Tuesday" = Jan 24th, "Next Tuesday" = Jan 31st
Both are wrong. First of all, why are we assuming that we are in next week??

How about this: Today is Wednesday Jan 11th. "This Tuesday" would have been Tuesday Jan 10th - the Tuesday that belongs to the current week. However, "This Tuesday" becomes an invalid phrase on Tuesday and can't be used again until Sunday because "This Tuesday" implies a future date within the current week. It would be technically correct, but confusing to call 1/10 "This Tuesday." Next Tuesday is Jan 17th. Tuesday 1/24 would be referred to as "The following Tuesday" or "Two Tuesdays from Now".

"Next (day)" means that day in the next week, not the next instance of that day to occur. "This (day)" means that day in the current calendar week, not the instance of that day within the 6 days following the current day. Using the archaic form "(Day) Next" implies the next instance of that day. So today 1/10, "Saturday Next" would refer to 1/14, but "Next Saturday" refers to 1/21. Another way to refer to the next appearance of the day is "This coming (day)". So to say "This Tuesday" today refers to 1/10, the Tuesday of the current week. "This coming Tuesday" refers to 1/17, the first upcoming Tuesday.
 
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