New Home Construction cost

cybychoice

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Jun 27, 2014
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Ankeny
it is pretty sad when 1/4 to 1/2 acre lots are going for 70-80k themselves anymore around Ankeny.
You found lots in Ankeny between 1/4 and 1/2 acre for 70/80k?! That is really low for Ankeny, when I was looking for lots that size last winter that would have been some of the lowest price l would have found. I would say they were closer to 100k on average than 70k. We ended up buying a 4 year old house that fits our needs perfectly.
 

cyfan4St8

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Lumber is super high right now all the storm damage and lesser supply . Heck I just checked this morning and 2x4x8 were running around $3 or less now they are still at $5.70 so almost double in price. I hate to say it unless you don’t mind the extra cost building a house right now is going to be way higher. My sister in law is building a house too and as they are finishing it a lot of things they have picked out like flooring and countertops keep getting back ordered so they had to switch a lot up to just get their house done .
 

Blackhawk6515

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Jul 21, 2008
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Lumber prices are soaring still, which sucks, because we also had plans on building this year. However, that quote per sq ft seems extremely high.

Our quote was for 2900 sq ft and a 40x45 attached garage, built on slab. Had 145k in materials and allowances, then concrete and getting the house framed and enclosed was an additional 93k. That doesn't include any hvac, plumbing, or electrical or a sheetrock hanging/ finishing quote. We'll be doing the rest of the interior work ourselves.
That is just mind boggling. Wow! Things have sure shot up in cost.
 

motorcy90

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Aug 12, 2018
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You found lots in Ankeny between 1/4 and 1/2 acre for 70/80k?! That is really low for Ankeny, when I was looking for lots that size last winter that would have been some of the lowest price l would have found. I would say they were closer to 100k on average than 70k. We ended up buying a 4 year old house that fits our needs perfectly.
there's a few of them out there mainly around the 1/4 acre size though. granted I will never move back to Ankeny right now even after growing up there.
 

dualthreat

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Oct 8, 2008
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There’s certainly no guarantee lumber prices will go down in the future. At least near future. How long do you want to wait? 5 years? I’d just build now.
 
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Pat

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Oct 20, 2011
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There’s certainly no guarantee lumber prices will go down in the future. At least near future. How long do you want to wait? 5 years? I’d just build now.
And it’s not my money, but it also seems likely that the possible eventual drop in lumber costs will be more than offset by interest rates (unless you are on the Dave Ramsey/Randy Moss plan).
 

Tri4Cy

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And it’s not my money, but it also seems likely that the possible eventual drop in lumber costs will be more than offset by interest rates (unless you are on the Dave Ramsey/Randy Moss plan).
That was out struggle. How much will the prices come down in the next year (we definitely would need a bigger house within a year) vs the long term costs due to higher rates. We opted for the "now" with the understanding that I don't expect the property value to appreciate much over the short term. Reversion to the mean and such.
 

BCClone

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Vinyl plank that looks like wood. Basically vinyl chunks that have engineered wood tops.
 

cyputz

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What is "luxury vinyl plank" and who is the marketing genius behind that?
just make sure the wear layer is substantial. We got 10/12 mil due to lake area and sandy.

I noticed some area neighbors were building SIP Homes, very energy efficient, we just could not afford it.

Builders have all the leverage right now.
Lumber up and they tack a up-fee on it.
Green lumber is need impossible to get.
 

ag2010law

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Feb 7, 2018
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Eek. Tip to OP, add a pantry if not in the plan. Cheaper than cabinets and so useful.
Yes we do have a pantry but also I would say we have a rather large kitchen which with the extra cabinets and counter space adds to cost. When I first heard about lvp I was apprehensive because I have experience with the cheaper vinyl flooring and didnt want that but from everything I’ve heard lvp is a really good product.
 
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motorcy90

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Aug 12, 2018
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There’s certainly no guarantee lumber prices will go down in the future. At least near future. How long do you want to wait? 5 years? I’d just build now.
Our FD just finally got a new station built last year. between the rise in cost over the 10 years it took from the 1st plan/idea to the time it actually took for approval, costs had risen over 20% for materials alone, had to cut about an extra 4000 sq ft off the new station mainly in the bay area.
 

sclotz

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Very interesting reading everyone posts. Housing costs in Japan are similar to Europe. For a foreign comparison, I paid 450,000 for a lot about 50' X 100' and a 1,300 sq foot home in Kanagawa, Japan five years ago. An enclosed single car garage is seldom and a yard larger than 20'20' is very hard to find and will cost an additional 100k plus. The trade off (despite the close confines) is there are zero issues with neighbors. Also, public schools, public medical care, and food, clothing, etc., is extremely inexpensive in comparison to the US. Electricity here is super expensive, so central heating/AC is seldom. The Asian style sliding doors and only heating the room you're in always apply.
 

Matt33

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Apr 12, 2015
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I wouldn’t build right now. You can buy a sheet of 4x8 OSB for the same price as plywood, at a cool $25 a pop. Let the lumber yards get caught up
 

Cloneon

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Oct 29, 2015
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Wife and I have been planning on constructing a new home for 2 years and finally have the plans completed and are getting prices on construction. Just curious what everyone else is seeing for construction prices? It is poor timing, as I know the prices have gone up substantially over the last year but I am trying to get a feel for if we are in the ballpark. We are planning on a ranch house that will be built very solid, 9' ceilings on main level and walk out basement, 3 car garage, luxury vinyl flooring, custom painted cabinets and quartz counters in the kitchen. I don't know how most figure price per square foot but for us including total heated square foot (basement and main level) it is coming out to around $220/sq ft. If you just figure the main level it is $375/ sq foot. Anyone else in this same spot or built a house not to long ago that could share what there price was?
40 years ago I received my first of two degrees from ISU (Architecture and CompSci). With a lifetime of passion in residential design/construction (always looking for pre-fab first), I can say there are so many things flawed with our residential pricing process. In this day and age, I'm aghast at the inability to separate material cost from labor cost, down to the dollar. Furthermore, my first design project was a design using pre-fab modules. That was 40 years ago and that industry is still not mainstream. As the labor pool continues to dwindle it's only natural to expect construction prices go up. This year, after much deliberation, I will be starting a company which will bridge the gap of component construction. With portable crane technology, the much improved construction of components, and the modernized shipping industry, now is the time to drastically cut costs, improve quality and safety, and assemble a home in 2 weeks. REALLY Sorry. This didn't address your specific question, but it gets my goat when this industry is still pricing by the square foot. Also, though it may be too late for you, it may not be for others. 'Bends' and nonconformant dimensions increase price, lower quality, lower efficiency, and increase construction time. Consider 'hidden' space as that, too, needs to be conditioned (eg walls, and ceilings). Employ passive design where possible. Do not skimp on ceiling insulation. Walls should be adequately designed for moisture escape. Go bare minimum on standard electrical outlets as nearly 90% of home devices are now DC (Note: government is in the dark ages on regulations). And one thing which I can't believe hasn't caught on is 'envelope' conditioning. If interested, message me and I'll be happy to provide more. Again, sorry about the rant.
 

SCarolinaCy

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Jun 20, 2011
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Greenville, SC
The only way to know if you are in the ballpark is to get multiple quotes on the same plan. There’s no way anyone can say it will cost about x/sq foot because plans and quality can vary so much.

Not sure what size house you are looking at, but 1,700 square feet on the main level comes out to $637,500 based on your numbers. That’s an expensive house but without knowing plans and materials there’s no way of knowing whether that’s a fair number or not.
Home BUILDING is $$$. AND, very stressful.
 

cycloneman003

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Curious if anyone here has experience building with panel/pre-fab homes like Wausau Homes? Wife and I are not in a hurry to move/build, but we're in the early stages of thinking about our next steps. We're going to our grow our current home within next couple years and I'm starting to think through our options. The Wausau Homes style of building/customization is appealing from the standpoint of speed and cost.

Just curious if anyone has insight on this style and process compared to stick built.
 

kirk89gt

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Feb 15, 2014
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Curious if anyone here has experience building with panel/pre-fab homes like Wausau Homes? Wife and I are not in a hurry to move/build, but we're in the early stages of thinking about our next steps. We're going to our grow our current home within next couple years and I'm starting to think through our options. The Wausau Homes style of building/customization is appealing from the standpoint of speed and cost.

Just curious if anyone has insight on this style and process compared to stick built.

The Wausau is a pretty slick way to go about building a home. We live in one and there are quite a few in our neighborhood.

@cylconeman003 - what kind of build prices are you seeing and the floor plans you are looking at? Trying to get a ball park as we are looking at making a job change (short term) and then possibly build the last home we will live in.