Mpls TV Station Reporting tonight on Jack Trice Death

cyking

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I see on the Kansas State athletics site they have a story about their first black football and basketball players.
They are reporting they are the first school in the conference to have a black player with scholarship.
Did Jack Trice not have a scholarship?
 

Cyclones_R_GR8

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But it did happen, not as soon or as easily as it should have , but it got done.
Yes and you can thank the student body for never giving up. Back in the 70's they wanted the stadium named after Jack. Many people believed ISU was hoping for a large donation to help pay off the stadium debt and they would name the stadium after them. They named the field after Jack in order to placate the students but they still wanted to name the stadium after Jack. I'm glad the university finally came around to it. Overall I think naming the stadium after Jack goes well past football and into the social issues of his time.
 
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im4cyru

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I can see the Hollywood version of the movie now. Two minutes of period football to include the faces of Minnesota spectators expressing righteous sorrow for what they witnessed on the field.

Denzel Washington turns in a critically acclaimed cameo appearance of an end of life performance.

One hundred and ten minutes starring Tom Hanks as Donald Kaul, who, with the aid of heroic students, campaigns relentlessly against the card carrying KKK, Iowa State University fan base for stadium naming recognition of Jack Trice. It's Hollywood.

No thanks, no exaggerations for me..I prefer to think of Ames college as a school who welcomed Jack, George Washington Carver and many other African Americans to attend and participate.

Does Jack Trice deserved to have Iowa State's stadium named after him? As Dan McCarney would say:"With Out a Doubt!"
 
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srjclone

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I see on the Kansas State athletics site they have a story about their first black football and basketball players.
They are reporting they are the first school in the conference to have a black player with scholarship.
Did Jack Trice not have a scholarship?
In the "Modern Era", yeah. But Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa State all had before the era of full integration in league sports.

"Before the formation of the conference, three African-American brothers at the University of Kansas are the first known to have participated in organized sports for a league school: Sherman Haney played baseball for KU beginning in 1888, followed by Grant Haney and then Ed Haney, the last of whom also played football at KU in 1893.[36] At the same time, the University of Nebraska football team had on its roster George Flippin, the son of a slave, beginning in 1891.[36] Nebraska's football team featured three more African-American players over the next 12 years. Notable among these NU players was Clinton Ross, who in 1911 apparently became the first African-American to participate in sport in the MVIAA, following the league's formation in 1907.[37]

Race relations in the United States, however, deteriorated in the early 20th century, and African-American athletes disappeared almost entirely from the conference in the four decades after Ross's final season at NU in 1913. The lone exception during the following decades was Iowa State. In 1923 Jack Trice became the first African-American athlete at Iowa State – and the only one in the conference. Tragically, Trice died two days after playing his second football game with Iowa State, due to injuries suffered during the game (against Minnesota). Jack Trice Stadium at Iowa State is now named in his honor. Trice was followed at Iowa State by Holloway Smith, who played football for ISU in 1926 and 1927. After Smith, the league's teams were all-white for more than two decades. (During this time all of the major professional sports leagues in the U.S. were also segregated.)

Modern era[edit]
The modern era of full integration of league sports began at Kansas State, with Harold Robinson. In 1949, Harold Robinson played football for Kansas State with an athletic scholarship. In doing so, Robinson broke the modern "color barrier" in conference athletics, and also became the first ever African-American athlete on scholarship in the conference.[38] Harold Robinson later received a letter of congratulations from Jackie Robinson, who had reintegrated major league baseball in 1947 while playing with the Brooklyn Dodgers.[38]

In the spring of 1951 the conference's baseball color barrier was broken by Kansas State's Earl Woods, and in the winter of 1951–1952 Kansas State's Gene Wilson and Kansas's LaVannes C. Squires jointly broke the conference color barrier in basketball."
 

Kagavi

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My book mentioned in this thread, Football's Fallen Hero--The Jack Trice Story, is elementary because that is the audience. It is a "hi-lo" book, hi interest and low vocabulary for young or reluctant readers. The original manuscript was longer, but the editors asked me to cut it for younger readers. The book is several years old but still sells.

Folks, I can't emphasize enough how much research there is in this book that isn't found elsewhere. As Steve says here, it was targeted towards young readers, but the information is not, so if you care even just a modicum about Jack, consider picking up the book. I own it myself and nearly all of the Jack Trice specials and articles in recent years have used Steve's research as a base.

While there have been many champions of Jack's story, including Tom Emmerson and others, if not for Steve's foresight in interviewing some critical people (Bob Fisher, Allen Boller, etc.) who knew Jack at Iowa State, his story would be much less well understood. All ISU fans owe him a debt of obligation for that reason alone.

It has been thrilling to see some of my own work used by others to spread Jack's story further and I'm sure Steve feels the same way. Quite frankly my philosophy is: "If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants." Well, Steve is one of the giants of Jack's story.

Every Iowa State fan plays a critical role in spreading his story. In the end, it's all about Jack. What will you do today to perpetuate his message of equality?
 

BoxsterCy

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I posted the Fox 9 on Facebook and got back comments from friends of friends who saw it because mutual friends had commented. Was fun to see "thanks for sharing" or "I never knew this" from people I didn't know down in Iowa with Hawk logos in the profile pictures.
 
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Cycsk

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Folks, I can't emphasize enough how much research there is in this book that isn't found elsewhere. As Steve says here, it was targeted towards young readers, but the information is not, so if you care even just a modicum about Jack, consider picking up the book. I own it myself and nearly all of the Jack Trice specials and articles in recent years have used Steve's research as a base.

While there have been many champions of Jack's story, including Tom Emmerson and others, if not for Steve's foresight in interviewing some critical people (Bob Fisher, Allen Boller, etc.) who knew Jack at Iowa State, his story would be much less well understood. All ISU fans owe him a debt of obligation for that reason alone.

It has been thrilling to see some of my own work used by others to spread Jack's story further and I'm sure Steve feels the same way. Quite frankly my philosophy is: "If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants." Well, Steve is one of the giants of Jack's story.

Every Iowa State fan plays a critical role in spreading his story. In the end, it's all about Jack. What will you do today to perpetuate his message of equality?


I ordered the book yesterday. Can't wait to receive Football's Fallen Hero--The Jack Trice Story
 
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Cycsk

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I shared the Jack Trice story with the curator of the National Civil Rights Museum when we were in Memphis for the Liberty Bowl. She was really interested in the heritage that our university has embraced.
 
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CyInDFW

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Seems silly. But until 1997, Iowa state didn't want to name the stadium after him. And he was forgotten here as well.

There were many of us in Ames that didn't allow him to be forgotten for years before 1997. The "old people" who donated back then threatening to take their money out of Iowa State are the ones that kept it from happening sooner...at least from my memory of it all, but then again, I'm almost one of those "old people" now.
 

Fishhead

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I recommend not to read the comment section. Especially the first idiot
 

Cycsk

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I ordered the book yesterday. Can't wait to receive Football's Fallen Hero--The Jack Trice Story


Football's Fallen Hero--The Jack Trice Story arrived today. Can't wait to read it.
 

Fanatic1973

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Then you fill those minutes with artistic license. Do you think "Remember the Titans" is a 100% accurate depiction of what actually happened? A Hollywood blockbuster about Jack Trice (if done correctly) could do more for Iowa State than any bowl game or tournament victory ever has.

It's a story that needs to be told. Starting with educating ignorant tavern haks who have no idea. Trust me, I've met them. Who's working on the screenplay?

I would have to agree. Everyone remembers the Titans, how about We are Marshall? Remember the movie "The Rookie" or "Hoosiers"? It could be made into a great story. Both my wife and I love watching sports movies that are based on real life.
 

SCarolinaCy

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Then you fill those minutes with artistic license. Do you think "Remember the Titans" is a 100% accurate depiction of what actually happened? A Hollywood blockbuster about Jack Trice (if done correctly) could do more for Iowa State than any bowl game or tournament victory ever has.

It's a story that needs to be told. Starting with educating ignorant tavern haks who have no idea. Trust me, I've met them. Who's working on the screenplay?
Agree. No such thing as bad publicity.
 
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