K-12 Return to school ongoing discussion

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In school or online?

  • In school learning

    Votes: 175 75.4%
  • Online at home

    Votes: 57 24.6%

  • Total voters
    232

BillBrasky4Cy

Well-Known Member
Dec 10, 2013
7,458
13,916
113
This is going to turn in to a rural vs urban/suburban thing. One dyingvs one thriving. The governor trying to preserve the “heritage” vs a whole whole bunch of money and growth. Let’s see who wins.
Oh for sure! Also, at this point her only shot at getting reelected is to hold on to the rural vote and pray for a miracle.
 

SEIOWA CLONE

Well-Known Member
Dec 19, 2018
2,394
2,386
113
58
I go back on the 18th, kids first day is the 24th, we are doing in class four days, online on Wednesday. All online work will be required, which it should have been in the spring.

My guess within 6 weeks we will be totally online until we get a vaccine.
 
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yowza

Well-Known Member
Jun 2, 2016
1,039
245
83
I go back on the 18th, kids first day is the 24th, we are doing in class four days, online on Wednesday. All online work will be required, which it should have been in the spring.

My guess within 6 weeks we will be totally online until we get a vaccine.
So how they gonna handle the vaccine? They gonna require everyone to get one? They don't do that with flu. Polls show maybe 40% to 50% of people will get a vaccine shot or shots when available. That's what is straight ahead of us and no one really wants to discuss that either.
 
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PSYclone22

Visual Analytics Mercenary
SuperFanatic
Aug 15, 2012
2,253
541
113
Des Moines
Reynolds is parading a superintendent who wants everyone back in school because his students are poor. SO fix the underlying problems instead of dumping social problems onto schools?
This is incredibly correct. So many are approaching this as a two choice option. There are two many other options!

We can do all in school and spread the virus.

We can do all in home and mess things up for many families financially.

We can do a hybrid.

OR we can pass further legislation to essentially pay significantly higher unemployment benefits to one family member per household, ensuring that at least one parent stay home and help the kids. This would allow 100% online learning while also accounting for financial issues families might have.

And before anyone says "but the unemployment income will be so high it will incentivize some people to not go back to work!" ... that's the f$#&ing point. Less people at jobs, more kids at home, both are good to stop the spread of the virus.
 

bawbie

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 17, 2006
45,704
27,559
113
Cedar Rapids, IA
Another waiver request denied. Iowa City has already pushed back their start date until mid-September. Will be interesting to see if they ignore the governor as well

 

BCClone

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
Sep 4, 2011
30,152
22,185
113
North Iowa
This is incredibly correct. So many are approaching this as a two choice option. There are two many other options!

We can do all in school and spread the virus.

We can do all in home and mess things up for many families financially.

We can do a hybrid.

OR we can pass further legislation to essentially pay significantly higher unemployment benefits to one family member per household, ensuring that at least one parent stay home and help the kids. This would allow 100% online learning while also accounting for financial issues families might have.

And before anyone says "but the unemployment income will be so high it will incentivize some people to not go back to work!" ... that's the f$#&ing point. Less people at jobs, more kids at home, both are good to stop the spread of the virus.
How long do you suggest the payment goes? Several are saying the whole school year is shot. What measurement would stop the payments?
 

BryceC

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
SuperFanatic T2
Mar 23, 2006
19,989
8,139
113
So how they gonna handle the vaccine? They gonna require everyone to get one? They don't do that with flu. Polls show maybe 40% to 50% of people will get a vaccine shot or shots when available. That's what is straight ahead of us and no one really wants to discuss that either.
I'm fine to discuss it. You get a the vaccine or you're not in public school. Easy, fixed.
 

SEIOWA CLONE

Well-Known Member
Dec 19, 2018
2,394
2,386
113
58
So how they gonna handle the vaccine? They gonna require everyone to get one? They don't do that with flu. Polls show maybe 40% to 50% of people will get a vaccine shot or shots when available. That's what is straight ahead of us and no one really wants to discuss that either.
Can we actually develop a vaccine before we worry about requiring kids to get it? The state used to require all kids be vaccinated before they could start school, and then the right, bowed down to the religious right, and made it optional. So now we can have kids in schools that have not been vaccinated because it interferes with the rights of the parent.

To me, that is simple, if you do not want to do it, then send you kid to a private school, but all public students will be vaccinated if they want to attend.
 
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BCClone

Well-Known Member
SuperFanatic
Sep 4, 2011
30,152
22,185
113
North Iowa
Can we actually develop a vaccine before we worry about requiring kids to get it? The state used to require all kids be vaccinated before they could start school, and then the right, bowed down to the religious right, and made it optional. So now we can have kids in schools that have not been vaccinated because it interferes with the rights of the parent.

To me, that is simple, if you do not want to do it, then send you kid to a private school, but all public students will be vaccinated if they want to attend.
I agree if you include staff also.
 

bawbie

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 17, 2006
45,704
27,559
113
Cedar Rapids, IA
I'm fine to discuss it. You get a the vaccine or you're not in public school. Easy, fixed.
It does bring up big problems depending the on competence of the rollout of the vaccine. If it is scarce, or expensive, requiring it to go back to school becomes problematic as well
 

AuH2O

Well-Known Member
Sep 7, 2013
3,960
4,124
113
3T a year forever?
If you believe parents and home determine a kids success far more than schools and teachers (as I do) this isn't so crazy. We throw tons of $ at schools and keep slipping. Why not stop throwing more and more money at schools to do what they don't do efficiently, and shouldn't be asked to do, which is RAISE kids, and throw that money at families to incentivize two parent households, or at least more time with parents to spend with children.

Maybe I'm wrong, but I can't imagine a HS doing a worse job than my rural Iowa HS preparing students academically for college, yet college attendance and success are quite high.

Have two HS friends that are/were coaches at Hoover, North and Lincoln. Both said teachers, opportunities, and resources were far better than our small town HS. But it was amazing how many kids had to miss school or practice because they were in single parent homes and had to either work themselves or had to raise siblings while the parent worked.
 
  • Agree
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Trice

Well-Known Member
Apr 1, 2010
2,910
2,809
113
Ankeny
It does bring up big problems depending the on competence of the rollout of the vaccine. If it is scarce, or expensive, requiring it to go back to school becomes problematic as well
I've asked this question elsewhere and got no responses. But I'm curious if there is any quality research or journalism on schools that strictly enforce mask policies and what their success has been. Granted, even if masks were strictly enforced in schools across the US, we are starting from a place of high infection levels so perhaps there's only such much it can do - there will still be kids showing up on day one infected.

Schools that have reopened so far have gone pretty badly but it's also not clear that many of them are enforcing mask policies either. Which seems pretty important right now.
 

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