Jury Duty

VeloClone

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I’m not saying you don’t have strong principles/a good work ethic, but isn’t it possible the attorney was just being nice? Especially because as a civil attorney he’s reliant on good will. It’s not like he’s going to say “oh yeah, I chose you because you’re an idiot who will believe anything I tell them.”

And I guess I’m also not surprised that the attorney for an employer would publicly say that the former employee didn’t have a case.
Also, the attorney didn't necessarily "choose" you. He actually might not have liked you in his pool but there were others who he liked even less and chose to strike them instead.
 
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JP4CY

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If you have a bit of a *ahem* record of sorts, are you less likely to be summoned? Asking for a friend.
I think you'll be fine Andrew/David(LOL)/Mark/Alex/Clay

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WooBadger18

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Also, the attorney didn't necessarily "choose" you. He actually might not have liked you in his pool but there were others who he liked even less and chose to strike them instead.
Yeah, that’s another good point. It isn’t always that either side wants you to be on a jury. It’s that they can live with you being on the jury
 

JM4CY

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Are you still bouncing around the NFL?
Thanks for asking! I spent some time dealing with some legal issues, headed over to Amsterdam to try out their pro league to make some money (turns our "pro American football" over there just means there is a group of heavy set women who are "pro" to having relations with American football players while on a fair amount of blow... I digress) then when that didn't work out, ole Coach Paulie called me, said he was proud of me, and offered me a job to coach a high school team so I am currently down on the beach where the only sign I need to worry about is the one they put out to make sure I keep my shorts on!! God bless!!!
 
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carvers4math

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When I was in grad school, a law student asked me to be a witness in his mock trial. He was a friend but his partner was pretty arrogant. They had students from a nearby college as jurors.

After the trial, which they actually won on the juror decision, they then let the jurors pick apart the performance of the attorneys. They actually did rule for our team but totally roasted the arrogant attorney. Everything from his derisive tone to his mustache and expensive watch. Surprisingly they did not let their disdain for him sway their verdict. It was limited to one afternoon at the courthouse on a Saturday though, so if they had days of enduring him, it might have been different. They did notice every annoying quirk he had.
 

kcdc4isu

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I’m not saying you don’t have strong principles/a good work ethic, but isn’t it possible the attorney was just being nice? Especially because as a civil attorney he’s reliant on good will. It’s not like he’s going to say “oh yeah, I chose you because you’re an idiot who will believe anything I tell them.”

And I guess I’m also not surprised that the attorney for an employer would publicly say that the former employee didn’t have a case.
I should also have said that he worked for my company in high school and college so he was familiar with us. As I was a supervisor that helped him assume some issues. And to put it bluntly the defense did not have a case. I think his lawyer hoped we would feel sorry for the guy and award him big bucks. Plus I was not the only person he made comments to there were two women whose husbands worked in the same industry that the supposed accident was in and the defense did strike them as I believe he thought they would go his way but they did not.
 
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RLD4ISU

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I've been summoned, but only had to report once and wasn't selected.

Many years ago I worked in a law firm & was responsible for putting together the jury selection questions and the instructions to the jury for deliberation. It was interesting and I assume not much about that process has changed. If I remember right, the attorneys from both sides had to agree which questions would be asked for selecting jury members and they also had to agree to the jury instructions (for deciding the outcome).

When I worked at the law firm, I was told if I was asked to report for jury duty to just tell them I what I did, where I worked and more than likely I'd be recused from jury selection.

I've heard of others that give very strong opinions on things (or experiences) and then are selected. It depends what the attorneys are looking for.

As far as getting out of jury because work is busy or your career, I think it depends on the judge. Some will not care and may refuse to recuse you just to make you stay through the process of selection. I've even heard of people that were the sole caretaker for a spouse told they would not be recused.

I've always heard to answer honestly and, if you request to be recused, be factual and respectful.
 

Donqluione

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No clue what the rules are before being selected. After selection you aren't allowed. I doubt I'll get selected for that trial since I have friends who are law enforcement and government attorney's. Defense will reject me as a juror pretty quickly on that.
Generally you'll be asked if you've heard about the case, and if you say you have, followed by asking if you've formed an opinion. That's why there are changes of venue for highly publicized cases, to have more potential jurists who aren't familiar with a case.

If you reply that you have heard about it and formed an opinion you'll probably be dismissed, EXCEPT that the judge may ask you questions to see if that truly taints you, and/or you're just trying to get out of serving. It may be hard to find enough people who haven't heard about the case, and many will have formed some sort of an opinion. The judge may be asking to help the attorneys decide whether they want to use a strike on you, or for his own decision as to whether to dismiss you/allow you to be dismissed.

Some sorts of relationship with law enforcement, family, friends, personal profession, does get you struck by the defense in criminal cases. But, personally that didn't prevent selection for civil cases.
 
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GMackey32

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Generally you'll be asked if you've heard about the case, and if you say you have, followed by asking if you've formed an opinion. That's why there are changes of venue for highly publicized cases, to have more potential jurists who aren't familiar with a case.

If you reply that you have heard about it and formed an opinion you'll probably be dismissed, EXCEPT that the judge may ask you questions to see if that truly taints you, and/or you're just trying to get out of serving. It may be hard to find enough people who haven't heard about the case, and many will have formed some sort of an opinion. The judge may be asking to help the attorneys decide whether they want to use a strike on you, or for his own decision as to whether to dismiss you/allow you to be dismissed.

Some sorts of relationship with law enforcement, family, friends, personal profession, does get you struck by the defense in criminal cases. But, personally that didn't prevent selection for civil cases.
Good to know. I'm "summoned" for the next 3 months in Hamilton County and have to check in every week. No trials this week and I don't see anything on the docket for next week. With my luck, I'll be called in the first part of May when that murder trial starts. I have read up on the case and have formed somewhat of an opinion so it'll be interesting to see what happens.
 

Donqluione

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Also, the attorney didn't necessarily "choose" you. He actually might not have liked you in his pool but there were others who he liked even less and chose to strike them instead.
If you start out as an alternate, the chances of ending up on the jury can increase as individuals aren't struck, if you end up being the "last one in". That happened to me the last time, at the beginning I thought I'd escape but as they kept striking it started to look like I'd be on the edge of not needed/in, and ended up in. They hardly asked me any questions, had I started in the pool and been asked more questions, I think I would have been dismissed just based on prior experience and knowledge.

Pretty easy trial though, not too long or difficult. The jury unanimously questioned why the case had been filed, kind of frivolous, plaintiff perhaps got bad advice as to whether to file or move on. In my jurisdiction the current practice is one trial and your service is done, so that was a plus for being selected.
 

Ms3r4ISU

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From my experience I've learned that the jury selection process is functionally a unique and critical part of trial lawyering. Lawyers with strong evidence-based cases will look for engineers and IT people. Lawyers with weak or frivolous cases will look for sheep who can be cajoled into following an idea rather than the presented facts.

I have been through the jury selection process four or more times and have been excused every time. I think I've been excused because I was a manager in a large company, wore a suit and tie, answered questions firmly, stayed alert, and tried to project a no nonsense type of personality.
My very limited experience (got a federal summons once and didn't need to go because we were moving out of that part of Iowa, and my county court 4 years ago) was kind of interesting. I was one of the final five excused. I always wondered if it was my answer to the defense attorney asking if I was part of a case would I want someone like me on the jury. I didn't think more than about 2 seconds to answer: absolutely, yes. I pay attention, I am a detail person and want to follow regulations, requirements, rules, etc.
That probably wasn't what he wanted to hear.