Help! I'm Fat - *** Official Exercise and Weight Thread ***

Drew0311

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Nov 7, 2019
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The thing with chiropractors is... sometimes they help. Sometimes your problem can't be fixed with adjustments though, totally depends what is wrong. But way too many are just there to get you on a program and keep you coming back and milk you. If you find one that says "ok now lets schedule 25 more visits" run far far away.

I have found with back problems, the diagnosis and treatment depends on who you see:
1. chiropractor? misalignment, let's adjust stuff
2. internal MD? inflammation, let's get you some meds
3. surgeon? you need surgery

That's not a dig on any of those fields, that's just their expertise. If you have 8 years of learning to use your hammer, then everything looks like a nail.

I have muscle problems in my back. I had a heat related incident in the Marines and have never got better as far as retaining water. So I have muscle spasms. I do Yoga daily and work out also and that helps. Chiropractor is not the way to go. In fact if you have a foam roller it basically does the same thing as a chiropractor and you also iron out the muscles in your back.

As far as food. My intake is great and I eat healthy. I just have a nasty snack problem. I eat snacks out of being bored and them sitting around. I am to close to the kitchen. I just have to figure a way to get healthier snacks. I love making Ice Cream and Carmel though. It's my sweet spot. I still am 6'2, 225 pounds and work out every day. So I am healthy.
 

CascadeClone

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When my mom was a nurse practitioner, she talked to many patients who wanted to ask the doctor for whatever pill they saw mentioned on TV for weight loss. When she asked them what they'd done to try an lose weight already, most said, "nothing." They don't want to make changes, they just want to lose weight.
It's almost like Americans are a lazy bunch of whiners who want a quick fix with no effort! Also, someone else should pay for it!

Frankly, its not hard to understand why some doctors have similarly given up trying to get people to eat better and exercise. Hell, people who can barely breathe refuse to quit smoking. I'd be frustrated too. And if I knew my patient needed to do X, but probably wouldn't or couldn't do X, then SHOULDN'T I prescribe them something that will help? Tough spot for a doc.
 

nhclone

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I need to start making my own salad dressing with oil and vinegar. Most of the so-called "healthy" salad dressings (especially the low-fat ones) are loaded with sugar.
Ive found the best one for me is simply balsamic vinegar and some olive oil mixed together. I usually throw in a few walnuts and some feta cheese with that combo and I’ve come to really enjoy it.
 
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ScottyP

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I've been doing a lot of strength training with some adjustable dumbbells. I recently upped my weights on my dumbbell squats and my lower back is now bothering me. I'm guessing my technique is slightly off but not sure where. Would doing some box squats with a folding chair help? I don't want to really screw up my back but want to make sure i'm making my lower body strong. Also, if there are some tips to help with lower back pain relief, that would be appreciated. It isn't terrible, just some discomfort.
 

CloneFanInKC

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I've been doing a lot of strength training with some adjustable dumbbells. I recently upped my weights on my dumbbell squats and my lower back is now bothering me. I'm guessing my technique is slightly off but not sure where. Would doing some box squats with a folding chair help? I don't want to really screw up my back but want to make sure i'm making my lower body strong. Also, if there are some tips to help with lower back pain relief, that would be appreciated. It isn't terrible, just some discomfort.
I suggest weighted step ups (holding DBs) instead of any type of squat.
 

besserheimerphat

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I've been doing a lot of strength training with some adjustable dumbbells. I recently upped my weights on my dumbbell squats and my lower back is now bothering me. I'm guessing my technique is slightly off but not sure where. Would doing some box squats with a folding chair help? I don't want to really screw up my back but want to make sure i'm making my lower body strong. Also, if there are some tips to help with lower back pain relief, that would be appreciated. It isn't terrible, just some discomfort.
I'd just reduce the weights again until the pain goes away. Ideally you'd wait for the effort to be noticeably less before upping the weight (assuming you're taking each set to somewhere within 4 to 1 reps of failure).

Or you could do bodyweight squats, lunges or Bulgarian split squats. If you want to keep using the dumbells, goblet squats are also an option as they keep your torso more upright and don't strain the back as much.

ETA: Part of getting your lower body strong includes developing a strong/resilient lower back. Don't be afraid to work it.
 

Cloned4Life

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Oh yeah, I believe what you're saying is true. But it works for me at least.
Right there with you. The combination of pain-relief therapy, acupuncture, and physiotherapy I receive from chiro has been "worth it" for me. My wife and I have not felt the quack/anti-vax with our current provider, although we have heard the the same types of horror stories shared in this thread (regarding other "chiropractor doctors" around the metro). IF the truth turns out to be that the absolute best case is that the perceived benefits I have experienced - including what I can only describe as feeling "cured" of 20 years of hardcore seasonal allergies (from acupuncture) - were the result of some sort of crazy fortuitous placebo effect... then respectfully, I can live with that.
 

Cloned4Life

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I suggest weighted step ups (holding DBs) instead of any type of squat.
I would have agreed with this in the past, until I started focusing more training with elevated heal squats, which allowed me to slowly and safely achieve a much deeper squat. I've never gone crazy into the "knees over toes" training but by incorporating a few of these types of concepts, I cannot believe how much better my knees feel now (and how much deeper of a squat I can maintain vs. my younger/intramural days (after tearing a right ACL and a left ACL in successive years playing adult flag football at Valley Stadium years ago :confused: - that sucked!).
 

madguy30

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That’s the way PT works a lot of the time unfortunately. That and managing the inflammation from the injury/underlying problem

Funny enough with my (previously mentioned) calf issue over the last week or so I had some recurring stiffness/pressure/swelling that I couldn't beat with some elements of pain as I walked.

However, when I would check for trigger points in a massage I really didn't feel much which would indicate some healing.

And mild/smaller calf raises didn't hurt so I've been doing those and while I still have some discomfort, my calf today felt better than it's felt in a long time for strength and stability.

I think the moderate 'pushing through' the calf raises may have actually gotten some smaller fibers firing for support which helps everything else.

I found it kind of fascinating and hopefully the trajectory continues and I can FINALLY get back to running.
 

madguy30

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I'd just reduce the weights again until the pain goes away. Ideally you'd wait for the effort to be noticeably less before upping the weight (assuming you're taking each set to somewhere within 4 to 1 reps of failure).

Or you could do bodyweight squats, lunges or Bulgarian split squats. If you want to keep using the dumbells, goblet squats are also an option as they keep your torso more upright and don't strain the back as much.

ETA: Part of getting your lower body strong includes developing a strong/resilient lower back. Don't be afraid to work it.

Targeting the obliques and glutes can make a lot of difference for this.

Side planks and a form of bicycle kicks/marches with my tailbone off the ground, mixed in with resistance band clamshells do the trick for me.
 

CloniesForLife

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One thing I've noticed is that when I am craving snacks (usually when I get home from work), i'll drink water and my snack craving goes away. I really need to focus on drinking more water because I know I don't drink enough.
Days when I'm not drinking water throughout the day I definitely snack way more
 

2122

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Just so you know calling Alzheimer’s type 3 diabetes not only isn’t an actual diagnosis but is also extremely controversial in the medical community. Otherwise the rest is fairly accurate
Yes, aware that the notion is controversial. “Type 3 diabetes” is a term some researchers use to describe the theory that insulin resistance and insulin-like growth factor dysfunction in the brain may cause Alzheimer's disease.

Here is some of what the CDC has to say:

Because your brain relies on sugar for its energy source, you may think, “The more sugar I give it, the better off my brain will be.” But that couldn’t be further from the truth. Having frequent episodes of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can stress the brain. And because the effects of high blood sugar happen over time and aren’t obvious right away, many people don’t know that their brain is being affected.

High blood sugar over time damages blood vessels in the brain that carry oxygen-rich blood. When your brain receives too little blood, brain cells can die. This is called brain atrophy and can cause problems with memory and thinking and eventually can lead to vascular dementia.
 

BigTurk

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Obviously everyone is different and people figure out what works for them and their schedule, but I've been finding a little more "regular" the last several months.

Stretching regularly as a form of yoga would be good for you. I'm not saying go straight yoga, but even 15-20 minutes of stretching everyday before some activity is very beneficial or first thing in the morning to get you started feeling good.

You could do some bands, or body weight activities. I've always gone to the gym and love it, but I mix in bands and body weight workouts too. Something like from betterme app where I tailer it to what I'm seeking like 15-25 minute workouts. I notice it's necessary for me because I've notice it works different parts/muscles where lifts I do don't, so helps being more well rounded. Twitter/X has some accounts where they post different ab workouts I've been using lately too.

Also, rowing is a great workout that works the whole body. I usually do that as a warmup to working out at the gym.

I think your biggest hurdle as you age is you're having to work harder to retain shape and form, so nutrition is even more important, but also tailor workouts to help suit your changing needs. Also, do you take creatine? I say this not to be oh get huge, creatine has been extensively researched and honestly, everyone should take it. It benefits brain chemistry and lots of positives about it.

Not that I've done this long enough yet, but my 3 year old son loves jumping on the trampoline. He can for a long time. Lately I've been jumping with him where we jump together, I've noticed keeping good form as we jump and 30-40 minutes of that is a heck of a workout on my legs and core. This type of workout is good since it is less stress on your joints but helps cardio and they say it helps your lymphatic system. I've read it's more effective than running. If you have grand kids already, then maybe try it sometime. If not, maybe go to a jump park or get yourself a smaller trampoline and work it in. You'd be surprised how effective it is.

tell me more about creatine. The brain fog I have scares me.

Love the messaging on the stretching. The older you get the more flexibility training becomes vital. The huge advantage of yoga over just stretching (still very valuable) is that it also can greatly help with balance. As people age the risk of slips and falls increases dramatically and improving/maintaining balance can avoid major injuries.

Only thing I want to say is to please do not promote trampoline workouts to people over 50, especially when they are dealing with old injuries. That’s just a recipe for people getting hurt and showing up in the ED. In order for a tramp workout to be cardio you really have to be “actively jumping” which is probably one of the most high risk exercises for an aging population.

Agree on the trampoline. We have one and I last 30 seconds before it hurts.
 

4theCYcle

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Yep it’s totally a push them through quickly for primary care providers in many areas. Won’t get any push back from me there it’s what the system has come down to in a lot of cases.

I also totally agree with you about masking the issue instead of getting to the underlying cause. The problem is the vast majority of Americans are not willing to make the necessary life changes and stick to those changes to avoid the medications sadly.

Wish it wasn’t the case and wish preventative care and education was more heavily incentivized and promoted
Don't disagree there. The problem - isn't insurance directed more towards fix said disease/issue instead of covering more incentive based preventative care?

I've had my fill of bad doctors over the years as well as some good ones. My issue with the industry is there is more than one way to improve one's health, not just prescription based medicine. Then they write off nature. The problem is sifting and finding someone when you run into issues. Then, navigating on ones own to see what works for our own bodies. The issue that I have is Drs. won't listen enough and then thinking they have all the answers by just writing scripts. Then when you try to improve those issues by voicing your opinion to management, they don't give a F*** what you say, you're just a number and they're there to drive the hospital into the ground. I've had my wife speak up on my behalf because she recognized issues and actually made suggestions to the physician because of her field. There is a certain hospital in DSM that I refuse to step foot in for various reasons and it is single handedly why I voice disdain/displeasure simply for how I was treated. Unfortunately, it just shows that it's a top down problem that won't get fixed. I will try to not have my negative feelings about the medical field towards you. But what I went through, was not fun. And how I feel now? 100% better, but I probably attribute 40-50% to finding the right Drs and 50% me eating better versions of "heathy" food and better supplements.

MDs, ND's, therapists, psychologists, PTs, chiros, they all have their place. But, unfortunately the process of weeding out the bad ones take time and money. There is a lot of good info and bad info out there.
Creatine is super well researched and safe. Biggest issue is gastrointestinal irritation. Only reason I don't take it is I'm cheap.


Sounds like you could look into glutamine/glycine. Creatine doesn't give me issues and I have IBD (Crohns).
tell me more about creatine. The brain fog I have scares me.
It's hard to pinpoint what can be causing your brain fog without me knowing your environment or diet. It could be several factors. But I am also not a dietician nor Dr.

A short tid bit on it - obviously many have their own thoughts about creatine but it's a naturally occurring amino acid in the body already. It increases your bodies production of ATP. Can help with exercise performance, muscle building, endurance, and brain health. The cognitive benefits are that it increases cellular energy in the brain, supports brain cell metabolism, and neurotransmission. So in short, can help with brain fog, poor concentration, memory lapses, and mental fatigue. So some have even said positive effects on depression and anxiety. I wouldn't suggest going over 5 g/day. But if you eat certain foods high in it maybe back off, like steak.

Everyone's different and their bodies can be affected differently by particular outside factors. I just know after changing several things in my diet and environment that my health has seemed to improve. This is just my opinion and I understand not everyone may agree or have the same results/outcome.

Obviously something I was doing in my past lead me to develop IBD, who knows. But I will say I'm in a much better place today than I was 6-8 years ago, but with the most progress the past year.
 

BigTurk

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Don't disagree there. The problem - isn't insurance directed more towards fix said disease/issue instead of covering more incentive based preventative care?

I've had my fill of bad doctors over the years as well as some good ones. My issue with the industry is there is more than one way to improve one's health, not just prescription based medicine. Then they write off nature. The problem is sifting and finding someone when you run into issues. Then, navigating on ones own to see what works for our own bodies. The issue that I have is Drs. won't listen enough and then thinking they have all the answers by just writing scripts. Then when you try to improve those issues by voicing your opinion to management, they don't give a F*** what you say, you're just a number and they're there to drive the hospital into the ground. I've had my wife speak up on my behalf because she recognized issues and actually made suggestions to the physician because of her field. There is a certain hospital in DSM that I refuse to step foot in for various reasons and it is single handedly why I voice disdain/displeasure simply for how I was treated. Unfortunately, it just shows that it's a top down problem that won't get fixed. I will try to not have my negative feelings about the medical field towards you. But what I went through, was not fun. And how I feel now? 100% better, but I probably attribute 40-50% to finding the right Drs and 50% me eating better versions of "heathy" food and better supplements.

MDs, ND's, therapists, psychologists, PTs, chiros, they all have their place. But, unfortunately the process of weeding out the bad ones take time and money. There is a lot of good info and bad info out there.

Sounds like you could look into glutamine/glycine. Creatine doesn't give me issues and I have IBD (Crohns).

It's hard to pinpoint what can be causing your brain fog without me knowing your environment or diet. It could be several factors. But I am also not a dietician nor Dr.

A short tid bit on it - obviously many have their own thoughts about creatine but it's a naturally occurring amino acid in the body already. It increases your bodies production of ATP. Can help with exercise performance, muscle building, endurance, and brain health. The cognitive benefits are that it increases cellular energy in the brain, supports brain cell metabolism, and neurotransmission. So in short, can help with brain fog, poor concentration, memory lapses, and mental fatigue. So some have even said positive effects on depression and anxiety. I wouldn't suggest going over 5 g/day. But if you eat certain foods high in it maybe back off, like steak.

Everyone's different and their bodies can be affected differently by particular outside factors. I just know after changing several things in my diet and environment that my health has seemed to improve. This is just my opinion and I understand not everyone may agree or have the same results/outcome.

Obviously something I was doing in my past lead me to develop IBD, who knows. But I will say I'm in a much better place today than I was 6-8 years ago, but with the most progress the past year.
For the most part my diet is pretty good. Recently diagnosed with Celiac, so that has cut down on my cheap beer after work habit (so sad, because I love a cold PBR, or some other cheap beer, after work). My recent diagnoses has helped me evaluate some things. I am not a sugary snack person generally speaking. Sure I will eat some, but not a lot. I don't drink soda regularly, maybe one a week but that is mostly a whiskey delivery mechanism, and I never sweeten my coffee or tea.

My bad habit is salty crunchy snacks. Potato chips, tortilla chips, pretzels...love 'em all. For Christmas I bought 75 pounds (not a typo) of salted in shell peanuts and found those to be the perfect snack. They fill me up, has a lot of fiber and protein, and just kinda fun to eat. I also try to eat a lot of vegetables. My go to is buying frozen stir fry veggie mix from the grocery store, heat some oil in a pan, throw in the veggies to give them a bit of a char (I like the char) with whatever spices I want, and maybe some meat. Great meal and really filling (that was today's lunch as a matter of fact).

Something is working because I am lighter now than I was in high school. I gotta get my head around some of the other issues, and come to terms that I am getting older and can't do everything anymore. I appreciate the feedback.
 

carvers4math

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What's the back story zoo or rich dude that has a giraffe as a pet? Looks like a nice facility and a really friendly giraffe.
There’s a USA Today story on Gerry the Giraffe. He’s privately owned. The chiropractor treats animals and people. The article has pictures of the giraffe cuddling with the chiropractor afterwards.
 
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