Friday OT- Dirty Jobs

BurgundyClone

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Apr 15, 2007
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East of Omaha
at ~13 years old I got suckered into a 1 hour job for a Hormel site had to crawl into a manure pit that was ~4x4x8'H and shovel manure into a bucket and hand it up 4000x. That was a one and done affair.
 

CYdTracked

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Mar 23, 2006
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Grimes, IA
an episode of Dr. Quinn and rabies still haunts me but do animals not get the hydrophobia? I remember thinking we had a calf with rabies once but it was actually an allergic reaction - she was guzzling water like no tomorrow and so much foam coming from her mouth.
It's been a long time since this but I recall this cow literally just stood in the middle of the creek and didn't move from that spot for days until she finally deteriorated and died. The vet said they usually stand there because they run a high fever and the cool water helps them plus they just ache and have no energy to move. Couldn't tell if she ever laid down as every day we checked pasture she was standing in the exact same spot and just gradually got thinner and died.
 
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CyCrazy

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Dec 17, 2008
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Ames
Power washing hog barns has been my worst job, but the money was good. Sucking out pig **** in the pit is also gross if something goes wrong. But spreading it out of the tank is easy.
 

CyCrazy

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Dec 17, 2008
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Ames
Power washing hog barns has been my worst job, but the money was good. Sucking out pig **** in the pit is also gross if something goes wrong. But spreading it out of the tank is easy.
 

CyCrazy

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Dec 17, 2008
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Power washing hog barns has been my worst job, but the money was good. Sucking out pig **** in the pit is also gross if something goes wrong. But spreading it out of the tank is easy.
 

Bipolarcy

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Oct 27, 2008
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Going rogue because I just thought of a topic- what are the dirtiest, grossest jobs that you have had to do, either at work or somewhere else?
Mine wasn't so much gross as it was dirty and sweaty. I used to work in a motor home factory in the foam insulation/undercoating pit. The motorhomes would come to me with bare stud and paneling walls. Think of a motor home with all the metal on the outside ripped off. That's how they looked when I got them.

I had to push these motorhomes up a slight ramp that had rails running over a hole in the floor. Believe it or not, I did that by myself. Once the front wheels got up on the rails, they couldn't go anywhere but straight. Before I got to that step, I had to board up the window holes with cardboard so has not to get spray foam insulation inside the unit. This shed in the middle of the factory had scaffolding along the side built into the walls with a ladder to get up to the upper level. It also had big doors at both ends that had to be shut when I was foaming.

My job was to spray insulation on the outside of the walls. Then trim any excess that slopped out over the studs with a big knife so that there would be no protrusions when the metal was put on, then go down in the pit and undercoat the unit, then throw four sheets of plywood on top of the unit, staple them down, then use a router to cut out vent holes and air conditioner holes. After that, I went down in the pit to undercoat. It was originally a two man job, but I foolishly showed that I could do it by myself and keep up with the line.

The reason it was sweaty was because I had to wear coveralls and gloves with a hood over my head and the insulation came out of the spray gun at 240 degrees. Combine that with an enclosed shed in the middle of an un-airconditioned factory in the middle of the summer, then having to go up another story, where it was hotter yet, to spray the top of the motor homes and it was miserably hot. I would be wringing wet after the first motorhome. Even my gloves would be wet. This factory only produced about 5 motorhomes a day, six on a good day.

The only respite I had was the hood was sort of a gas mask connected to an air hose because the foam was toxic, so I had air blowing on my face the entire time. Going down in the pit to undercoat the units was also a bit of a relief because it was cooler down there. But that was also the dirty part because the black, tar-like undercoating would drip on you if you weren't careful. After I got done with the units, they moved on to get the metal siding put on, where three people were doing that job.
 

CascadeClone

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Oct 24, 2009
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at ~13 years old I got suckered into a 1 hour job for a Hormel site had to crawl into a manure pit that was ~4x4x8'H and shovel manure into a bucket and hand it up 4000x. That was a one and done affair.
I was "voluntold" to help my Dad help his friend throw hay one time at about the same age. I had the easy job throwing it from the wagon onto the conveyor while Dad and his buddy stacked it up in the barn.

Boy was that a motivational experience to get good grades, go to college, and NOT do farm work or anything else requiring that level of physical labor.
 
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JayV

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When I was between professional jobs for a few months I did some work in the porn industry.
It takes a surprisingly small amount of time for it to get old. And the pay wasn't great.
 

CloneFanInKC

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Jul 26, 2021
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* power washing combines
* power washing hog buildings
* emptying the baby's diaper pale
* changing baby diapers
* stacking hay
* shelling corn
* bagging sawdust

bagging sawdust was great money for the amount of time it took. It was just really messy work and hard labor.
 

MeanDean

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Jan 5, 2009
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Blue Grass IA-Jensen Beach FL
Growing up we had an open grated corn bin for ear corn.
As the year went by we'd empty it load by load into Dad's pickup truck and haul it to the local elevator about 9 miles away and get the load ticket.

It wasn't bad initially. But when it became summer and time to make sure it was empty for the year's new crop we had to toss them ear by ear into the pickup. As you went down further and further you'd start to encounter mouse and rat nests. Lots of rotted corn mixed with rodent urine and feces. As you got down far enough it was just a matter of shoveling the remaining quagmire out the door as it was totally unsuitable for sale. And at the lowest levels was where the rats and mice hung out until it was abandon ship with no option.

Our dog and the neighborhood cats loved that part, hanging out around the perimeter. Besides the smell the worst was when some panicked mouse decided to run up your pant-leg. Funny to watch if it wasn't you as the victim.
 
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FriendlySpartan

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Jul 26, 2021
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Disimapacting bowels was awful as a resident. The one thing that has gotten me close to vomiting was some necrotized tissue in a huge fat flap that had a couple maggots in it. The smell with the visual sent me into the hallway for a min.
 

Turn2

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May 12, 2011
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Clusterfunkeny
Growing up we had an open grated corn bin for ear corn.
As the year went by we'd empty in load by load into Dad's pickup truck and haul it to the local elevator about 9 miles away and get the load ticket.

It wasn't bad initially. But when it became summer and time to make sure it was empty for the year's new crop we had to toss them ear by ear into the pickup. As you went down further and further you'd start to encounter mouse and rat nests. Lots of rotted corn mixed with rodent urine and feces. As you got down far enough it was just a matter of shoveling the remaining quagmire out the door as it was totally unsuitable for sale. And at the lowest levels was where the rats and mice hung out until it was abandon ship with no option.

Our dog and the neighborhood cats loved that part, hanging out around the perimeter. Besides the smell the worst was when some panicked mouse decided to run up your pant-leg. Funny to watch if it wasn't you as the victim.
Saw more of this as a kid than I had to endure myself, but it seemed those old corn cribs also harbored a lot of bee and wasp nests.

Shoveling beans out of a bin is probably the worst abuse my lungs ever endured, bongs not withstanding.
 
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coolerifyoudid

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Feb 8, 2013
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KC
In one of our confinement barns, a hog got in a scrap with another hog. Once blood was spilled, the feeding frenzy was on. The injured hog was pretty much reduced to bones and viscera by the time I got there. Somehow, the remnants had fallen through the slats in the floor and disabled the scraper that ran the length of the confinement barn floor.

I had to army crawl the length of the confinement barn (underneath all of the pens, about 50 feet with roughly 2 feet of clearance) through all of the **** and piss you could wish for in order to fix the scraper. Then, once fixed, I had to make that same glorious crawl back to get out.

Oh, this was also in July, so I had a fantastic combination of sweat and **** pretty much anywhere that I had skin. That smell was in my nose for a solid week.
 

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