Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) - Treating green ash to keep them alive.

t-noah

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I always thought the ash was the go to baseball bat, and that's true. Turns out, maple and birch are, and have been, in the mix for a while now, 15-20 years?

So now I guess it's going to be either maple or birch for baseball bat production.
 

t-noah

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After reading this article, one of my questions was answered. A few years ago I noticed some MLB players with the label of the bat pointing inline with the contact of the ball (not up or down). I thought to myself, they of all people, should know better. Label always up (or down), I was taught.

Well, on maple bats, some prefer to hit "against the grain" as the maple bat has more durability this way. And maple bat manufacturers are now printing their labels parallel to the grain, meaning the label should still be up, but hitting the ball perpendicular to the grain.

Pretty interesting to learn.
"Note about safety: The label on maple bats is stamped with the grains rather than on the top like ash. There was a MLB study done in 2008 because so many maple bats were shattering when breaking, potentially causing serious injury. The results of this study was, when baseballs are hit on top of the maple bats wood grains opposed to with the grains, (like you would with ash) the bat is more durable. So for 2009 maple bats changed the location of their label, (you still want the label pointing up or down at contact)."
https://probaseballinsider.com/maple-vs-ash-vs-birch/

 
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t-noah

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So I kind of forgot about birch trees (and maybe aspen too), great trees. And used for baseball bats now!

And if you like the white birch bark, how about sycamores, or the London plane!
 

2122

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Green ash are dying here in southern Minnesota due to infestion of EAB. I have three big, old green ash trees I'd like to keep alive. I've heard that injection with chemical that kills the borers/larvae is best treatment for large trees, and needs to be done every 2 years or so. Wondering if anyone out there has hired an arborist to treat green ash trees? Any tips/suggestions? Thx.
So my 3 big green ash trees (8-9' circumference at breast height) were treated this morn by a certified arborist. $300/tree. Each tree was injected TreeAge G4, active ingr. is emamectin benzoate. It gets quickly sucked up into the trees this time of year. This makes the emerald ash borer larvae stop feeding and destroying the trees. Treatment last for 2 years.
 

intrepid27

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My understanding is that if your dead tree should fall or get blown over in a storm and cause damage, most insurance policies will not cover the damage since the tree was dead. I always think about this when I see giant dead ash trees in people's yards.
Some homeowner insurance policies have tree coverage IF the tree is touching your house when it falls. I got close to $5K after the derecho because one of the trees I lost landed up against the side of our house. Neighbor up the street with same company lost more trees but received no coverage.
 

isuno1fan

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So my 3 big green ash trees (8-9' circumference at breast height) were treated this morn by a certified arborist. $300/tree. Each tree was injected TreeAge G4, active ingr. is emamectin benzoate. It gets quickly sucked up into the trees this time of year. This makes the emerald ash borer larvae stop feeding and destroying the trees. Treatment last for 2 years.
Not sure where you live, but I paid $180 per tree with larger trunks. This is in West Des Moines. Seems you got bamboozled.
 

CyCity

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Not sure where you live, but I paid $180 per tree with larger trunks. This is in West Des Moines. Seems you got bamboozled.
I made fun of my neighbor in WDM a few years ago for treating his ash tree thinking he was just throwing away money. Yeah he has the only one left in the neighborhood.
 
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GMackey32

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I have an ash tree in my backyard that's toast. I need to get it taken down before a strong storm knocks it over. It only took a couple of years for that thing to go from full leaves to completely barren.
 

cysmiley

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Following up on my Ash Tree. Finally got the tree guy out, different service than the people that were treating it, they never returned my calls, maybe they are out of business! Anyway, the new guy said the tree is infected, enjoy it for probably a couple of years. Of interest, he said the healthy part of the tree tries to compensate for the invasion of EAB by additional "sucker" growth in the still healthy part of the canopy, thus affecting the natural structure of the tree, making the limbs of the healthy part heavier than they naturally would be and more susceptible to wind damage and major broken branches. He said at this point save your money and enjoy the tree for a year or two, then it will need to come out as it will be a skeleton. Says he's seen it many, many times. He's going to give me an estimate for taking it down this weekend and also trimming out the dead portion, but it will be for aesthetic purpose to trim, the tree is a goner! EAB wins! Damn!! :mad:
 
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2122

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Following up on my Ash Tree. Finally got the tree guy out, different service than the people that were treating it, they never returned my calls, maybe they are out of business! Anyway, the new guy said the tree is infected, enjoy it for probably a couple of years. Of interest, he said the healthy part of the tree tries to compensate for the invasion of EAB by additional "sucker" growth in the still healthy part of the canopy, thus affecting the natural structure of the tree, making the limbs of the healthy part heavier than they naturally would be and more susceptible to wind damage and major broken branches. He said at this point save your money and enjoy the tree for a year or two, then it will need to come out as it will be a skeleton. Says he's seen it many, many times. He's going to give me an estimate for taking it down this weekend and also trimming out the dead portion, but it will be for aesthetic purpose to trim, the tree is a goner! EAB wins! Damn!! :mad:
Just curious. How long ago had the tree been treated? Was the treatment injections into the trunk or did they pour the stuff on the ground around the base of the tree?

I've got four sick ash trees in my front yard. Gonna knock em down in the fall which is a more pleasant time for tree work IMO. Maybe have the 'clones on the radio beating up on EIU.
 

cysmiley

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Just curious. How long ago had the tree been treated? Was the treatment injections into the trunk or did they pour the stuff on the ground around the base of the tree?

I've got four sick ash trees in my front yard. Gonna knock em down in the fall which is a more pleasant time for tree work IMO. Maybe have the 'clones on the radio beating up on EIU.
It was treated two years ago, by tree service, they drilled a couple of holes in it, and injected. I didn't see them do it , cost $300.00. Prior to that application, when I heard on the news of the bug reaching Iowa, I took a recommendation from a neighbor, and ordered a chemical that I mixed in a 5 gallon bucket, and poured on the ground around the base of the tree, it was supposed to be good for two years also. As the infestation in the state grew, figured I'd have it done professionally the second time. If I had to do it over, probably just do it yearly with my initial method, as it was MUCH cheaper, and probably just as effective.

EDIT: Guess treatments must have done something, as a lot of ash trees have come down in town, and the tree guy gives ours another two years.
 
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ISUAgronomist

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Following up on my Ash Tree. Finally got the tree guy out, different service than the people that were treating it, they never returned my calls, maybe they are out of business! Anyway, the new guy said the tree is infected, enjoy it for probably a couple of years. Of interest, he said the healthy part of the tree tries to compensate for the invasion of EAB by additional "sucker" growth in the still healthy part of the canopy, thus affecting the natural structure of the tree, making the limbs of the healthy part heavier than they naturally would be and more susceptible to wind damage and major broken branches. He said at this point save your money and enjoy the tree for a year or two, then it will need to come out as it will be a skeleton. Says he's seen it many, many times. He's going to give me an estimate for taking it down this weekend and also trimming out the dead portion, but it will be for aesthetic purpose to trim, the tree is a goner! EAB wins! Damn!! :mad:
Based on how mine progressed, if you have a full canopy this year, you'll have 2 years of decline and then chainsaw in year 3.
 

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