Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) - Treating green ash to keep them alive.

t-noah

Well-Known Member
Feb 2, 2007
17,532
11,109
113
Maybe this could be a plan, but there's not much of a place to put it to "process" it.
Just across the neighbor's line (on their side) should be fine. :D

Kidding aside, the EAB has been a huge problem. Not only losing the ash, but the cost to bring these dead trees down, plant new ones, etc.

The tree service companies are probably OK with it though.
 

t-noah

Well-Known Member
Feb 2, 2007
17,532
11,109
113
Maybe this could be a plan, but there's not much of a place to put it to "process" it.
Do you have any chainsaw experience? If not, that shouldn't stop you, but do proceed carefully, and spend a lot of time learning before doing. YouTube is great!

But be safe! Chainsawing is dangerous enough, more so without knowledge and being extremely careful.
 
  • Like
Reactions: khardbored

isucyfan

Speechless
Apr 21, 2006
21,012
4,555
113
51
Saint Paul, MN
Do you have any chainsaw experience? If not, that shouldn't stop you, but do proceed carefully, and spend a lot of time learning before doing. YouTube is great!

But be safe! Chainsawing is dangerous enough, more so without knowledge and being extremely careful.
No, but I know someone who has extensive experience and would help out for beer.
 

khardbored

Well-Known Member
Oct 20, 2012
9,824
7,136
113
Middle of the Midwest
SIAP, but I tried the Menards / Home Depot self-treatment where you mix it and pour it around the base. It did absolutely nothing -- admittedly, I didn't treat until after I already started to notice the damage, so it was likely too late by then. 25-30' tree (our only shade tree in front yard) had to come down in 2022. :(
 

VeloClone

Well-Known Member
Jan 19, 2010
45,982
35,361
113
Brooklyn Park, MN
Mrs. Velo and I regularly take walks through and outside our neighborhood (Minnesota). It is amazing the number of ash trees that are beyond infected and need to come down now. Even the ones tagged from treatment are starting to show infestation. Probably less than 1% that are tagged (treated) and are showing no signs of distress. On one long block every single house has all of the trees (one or both) in the front yard and some in the back that are at the point where they should definitely be taken before they come down on their own. This is probably a dozen houses with 1-3 trees each. Ash was definitely the go to for that developer and the neighborhood is paying the price now.

I had one ash that was a garbage tree to begin with - it leaned and it continued to lean more and more toward the house the larger it grew. I took it down about 6 years ago before it could get too tall for me to handle myself and we knew the borer was coming anyway. It shaded one bedroom on the west side of the house, but I have never regretted that decision.
 
  • Like
Reactions: t-noah

NWICY

Well-Known Member
Sep 2, 2012
30,094
25,653
113
I'm in the Twin Cities, so that explains part of the high cost. There's no room in my yard to drop it and cut it up, so it's gotta come down piece by piece. Here's one of them. The other is a bit bigger. View attachment 129815
Damn that's a beautiful yard and ignore my
DM asking for your location.
 

t-noah

Well-Known Member
Feb 2, 2007
17,532
11,109
113
Mrs. Velo and I regularly take walks through and outside our neighborhood (Minnesota). It is amazing the number of ash trees that are beyond infected and need to come down now. Even the ones tagged from treatment are starting to show infestation. Probably less than 1% that are tagged (treated) and are showing no signs of distress. On one long block every single house has all of the trees (one or both) in the front yard and some in the back that are at the point where they should definitely be taken before they come down on their own. This is probably a dozen houses with 1-3 trees each. Ash was definitely the go to for that developer and the neighborhood is paying the price now.

I had one ash that was a garbage tree to begin with - it leaned and it continued to lean more and more toward the house the larger it grew. I took it down about 6 years ago before it could get too tall for me to handle myself and we knew the borer was coming anyway. It shaded one bedroom on the west side of the house, but I have never regretted that decision.
Smart boy! I could sense/see (definitely albeit slightly) that the EAB had arrived 6 years ago also, here. Once an area is infested, yes, it's just a matter of 4-5 years. Sad.

And your story is a great lesson, to plant, replant with several varieties of trees, for just that reason (if nothing else). Something comes along and threatens one variety of tree, the whole canopy is not lost.
 
  • Winner
  • Like
Reactions: NWICY and VeloClone

t-noah

Well-Known Member
Feb 2, 2007
17,532
11,109
113
Got several, they're gorgeous! Got shellbark and pignut hickory too.
Off to a great start in hickories then!

If I needed to plant some more trees (I really don't; my last round was planting over 20 pecan trees, from the nut), I'd consider going to a park or nature center, and pickup/label several seeds, nuts that you might want to grow.

Then read up on "stratification" and do that (put them away for a 'winter'). Plant the nuts/seeds, after stratifying them, see if they come up that year or the next. You do need time on your side, and to be in no hurry.

I still might do that sometime with a Japanese Maple or two.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NWICY and 2122

t-noah

Well-Known Member
Feb 2, 2007
17,532
11,109
113
Got several, they're gorgeous! Got shellbark and pignut hickory too.
And as I just mentioned, pecan! Consider that tree. Great tree and beautiful, if it will grow that far north! Walnut family, I believe.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NWICY

Kinch

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2021
3,536
3,071
113
I consider myself very lucky i was able to get a tree guy to drop mine for about $300. Was a lot of work ripping up the branches and hauling loads away to the dump, but still better than paying a few thousand to get it removed.
Me too. I had the tree guy take away the branches and leave the trunk and bigger limbs and cut them up into fire wood size portions. I bought a milwaukee chain saw and a hand splitter and had firewood for my campouts for three or four years. They were the best wood to burn. Our state park also gave permits to haul away limbs for your own firewood. We had some great campouts.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NWICY

t-noah

Well-Known Member
Feb 2, 2007
17,532
11,109
113
Mrs. Velo and I regularly take walks through and outside our neighborhood (Minnesota). It is amazing the number of ash trees that are beyond infected and need to come down now. Even the ones tagged from treatment are starting to show infestation. Probably less than 1% that are tagged (treated) and are showing no signs of distress. On one long block every single house has all of the trees (one or both) in the front yard and some in the back that are at the point where they should definitely be taken before they come down on their own. This is probably a dozen houses with 1-3 trees each. Ash was definitely the go to for that developer and the neighborhood is paying the price now.

I had one ash that was a garbage tree to begin with - it leaned and it continued to lean more and more toward the house the larger it grew. I took it down about 6 years ago before it could get too tall for me to handle myself and we knew the borer was coming anyway. It shaded one bedroom on the west side of the house, but I have never regretted that decision.
What are your neighborhoods doing now, after seeing the obvious? Are they starting to plant some seedlings (if you're cheap like me) or other trees, now? Or are they waiting until all the ash come down?

It is really surprising how a very small tree, seedling, can grow and change in 5-10 years. In 10 years most are quite big, 20 years, very big. The sooner you plant the quicker you will see the desired result(s).
 
  • Like
  • Winner
Reactions: NWICY and Kinch

casey1973

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2012
2,325
1,401
113
Ames
Well I'm one of those treating 2 ash trees. one in the back yard and the city is still treating the one in parkway in front, but said after this year they won't do it anymore but said I could keep treating it if I wanted to. Both trees have a great canopy and I don't see any signs yet. The shade that these offer is pretty darn good. I bet that one in the back will be at least 8-9k to remove it.
 

JVAR

Well-Known Member
Mar 27, 2006
968
809
93
Eagle Grove, IA
Well I'm one of those treating 2 ash trees. one in the back yard and the city is still treating the one in parkway in front, but said after this year they won't do it anymore but said I could keep treating it if I wanted to. Both trees have a great canopy and I don't see any signs yet. The shade that these offer is pretty darn good. I bet that one in the back will be at least 8-9k to remove it.
I had five ash trees. Luckily our city took four of the five in the berm. I paid the 5th one to be removed and the guy should do it this week. I paid $1200 and it is a huge ash tree, but that does not include grinding the stump. He gave us a deal as he was already removing several for the city. I thought about treating them but I think it is just prolonging the inevitable. Depending on where you live and the access of the tree, I think you could find someone cheaper than $8-9K. I do live in a small town, however. Makes me sick to lose them. I will am not sure what trees to plant instead. Any suggestions are welcome. We have three maples and an oak.
 

Latest posts

Help Support Us

Become a patron