Dowling and Valley recruiting players From all over

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Mr.G.Spot

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when a school that recruits plays schools that can’t recruit. It’s a legit uneven playing field. It’s fine if they recruit, however play other teams across the country that recruit also. Like the prep schools
That is why several states have private school championships and public school championships. This argument has been going on forever (40-50 years), but Iowa is behind the times a little bit. Public schools can and do recruit;however, it is a little more difficult for them to recruit. It's not fair, but welcome an age-old argument that won't go away until u have two state champs - public and private.

I also believe there are some states that require private schools to go up one class in the state tournaments.
 
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SEIOWA CLONE

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That is why several states have private school championships and public school championships. This argument has been going on forever (40-50 years), but Iowa is behind the times a little bit. Public schools can and do recruit;however, it is a little more difficult for them to recruit. It's not fair, but welcome an age-old argument that won't go away until u have two state champs - public and private.

I also believe there are some states that require private schools to go up one class in the state tournaments.
I doubt if the state of Iowa has enough private schools to actually run a public and private school athletic tournament for each. But they could easily force all private schools up a class. Now that would do nothing to the 4A schools but it would greatly help the smaller public schools that are now being forced to compete with private religious school.
 

TitanClone

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I'll never understand those outside of the upper-upper-class sending kids to private school unless they get significant scholarships. Dowling's tuition is $8500 if your a member of the parish and $12K if you're not. That's pushing ISU numbers (not counting room and board) why wouldn't you instead find the best public school in your area and put that tuition money into your kids college fund?
 

Drew0311

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I'll never understand those outside of the upper-upper-class sending kids to private school unless they get significant scholarships. Dowling's tuition is $8500 if your a member of the parish and $12K if you're not. That's pushing ISU numbers (not counting room and board) why wouldn't you instead find the best public school in your area and put that tuition money into your kids college fund?

There are also a lot of public schools in suburbs that rank just as high education wise as well.
 

cyclone4L

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I'll never understand those outside of the upper-upper-class sending kids to private school unless they get significant scholarships. Dowling's tuition is $8500 if your a member of the parish and $12K if you're not. That's pushing ISU numbers (not counting room and board) why wouldn't you instead find the best public school in your area and put that tuition money into your kids college fund?
You aren't only going for the education, you are going for the connections to other students and the impact those connection have.

For every good student in public school, there's a few unmotivated and a few bad influence kids. You get the unmotivated and bad influence kids in private as well, but the ratio is much more heavy on the good student side.

I'm very pro-private if you have the ability to make the sacrifice. If not, I'd try to find the best public school that you can and move to make it happen.
 

jmb

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I'll never understand those outside of the upper-upper-class sending kids to private school unless they get significant scholarships. Dowling's tuition is $8500 if your a member of the parish and $12K if you're not. That's pushing ISU numbers (not counting room and board) why wouldn't you instead find the best public school in your area and put that tuition money into your kids college fund?
That is fundamentally why there are not many private schools in Iowa. Historically public education has been very strong. As that continues to wane private school presence will strengthen. That said private schools will likely never be able to have stand alone championships simply based on Iowa's population.
 

TitanClone

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There are also a lot of public schools in suburbs that rank just as high education wise as well.
Just looked at Dowling's requirements to graduate. 4 credits in Theology vs 0.5 in Technology, no wonder we have so many anti-vaxxer's and those who don't understand the separation of church and state. My average public high school allowed me to earn something like 15 engineering credits for a couple hundred bucks before I stepped foot on campus in Ames.

https://www.dowlingcatholic.org/academics/graduation-requirements
 

CloneJD

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I'll never understand those outside of the upper-upper-class sending kids to private school unless they get significant scholarships. Dowling's tuition is $8500 if your a member of the parish and $12K if you're not. That's pushing ISU numbers (not counting room and board) why wouldn't you instead find the best public school in your area and put that tuition money into your kids college fund?
Because they perceive value in it. Some drive nice cars, some have large houses, some have fancy vacations or vacation-homes. Some like to send their kids to private schools. To each their own IMO.
 

TitanClone

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You aren't only going for the education, you are going for the connections to other students and the impact those connection have.

For every good student in public school, there's a few unmotivated and a few bad influence kids. You get the unmotivated and bad influence kids in private as well, but the ratio is much more heavy on the good student side.

I'm very pro-private if you have the ability to make the sacrifice. If not, I'd try to find the best public school that you can and move to make it happen.
My cynical mind looks at that as sheltering kids from the real world and trying to push some responsibility away from a parent in terms of motivating and guiding their kids. Seeing unmotivated kids and learning their story whether it be mental health issues or just poverty issues will help kids learn compassion.

I'd also argue that in most "good" public schools it's a few motivated to 1 unmotivated, I had something like a 3.9 in high school and finished 40ish out of 175ish in my class.
 

CloneJD

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My cynical mind looks at that as sheltering kids from the real world and trying to push some responsibility away from a parent in terms of motivating and guiding their kids. Seeing unmotivated kids and learning their story whether it be mental health issues or just poverty issues will help kids learn compassion.

I'd also argue that in most "good" public schools it's a few motivated to 1 unmotivated, I had something like a 3.9 in high school and finished 40ish out of 175ish in my class.
SERVICE HOURS
The goal of Dowling Catholic High School’s Christian Service Hour program is to ensure that students are seeking to serve the community, the world at large, and to see Christ in all people. Christian service is defined as that which takes us beyond a narrow concern for ourselves, and moves us to promote the common good and to uphold the human dignity of every person. In the end we are looking to serve those that are poor, vulnerable, or marginalized in the world around us.

Students must complete 80 hours of service for graduation and log them through the x2VOL website. Ten service hours, along with a 300-word Reflection Paper, must be completed during each semester. During the semester, theology teachers will keep track of hours and papers for their students; all hours and papers must be turned in by December 1st (fall semester) and May 1st (spring semester). Students taking a summer theology class will report hours during the first semester to the Director of Formation and Ministry.
 

beentherebefore

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Let's not forget......

Some (certainly not all, of course!) people also decide to send their children to private schools to "avoid" certain "types" of people. Yes, there are religious beliefs as part of the curriculum at faith-based private schools, but for some people, they also want not more "quality" of education but less sex ed and people not like them. But they are fine with good athletes in attendance........
 

cyclone4L

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My cynical mind looks at that as sheltering kids from the real world and trying to push some responsibility away from a parent in terms of motivating and guiding their kids. Seeing unmotivated kids and learning their story whether it be mental health issues or just poverty issues will help kids learn compassion.

I'd also argue that in most "good" public schools it's a few motivated to 1 unmotivated, I had something like a 3.9 in high school and finished 40ish out of 175ish in my class.
Take it from me (someone who went to both private and public), I was around those unmotivated kids. They bullied the S*** out of me everyday. They crushed my self-esteem. Kids are like chameleons, they will transform into their surroundings.

As for the "real world", I don't want my kids to have to live that. I don't have kids yet, but I'm never going to send them into a coal mine or the ghetto to get some "real world" experience. Yes, they'll have jobs so they can learn the value of money and working with others, but that is a gamble for them just to get some real world experience.

That is my point of view from my experience. I'm sorry if I sound like an elitest D*uchebag.
 

20eyes

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By Iowa state law, every public school in the state must permit open enrollment either in or out of the district. A district can slow it down by putting in place certain rules like time lines to leave, but they can never stop it.

Education and money go hand in hand, its really that simple. The reason that WDM Valley has higher rated students and more of them is because of the tax base of the community, compared to any of the Des Moines inner city schools.
More money draws in better teachers, with better teaching tools, while smaller, poorer districts do without. Its like comparing recruiting football players with Alabama and ISU.
So mechanisms by which public schools are able to siphon off better athletes from their home districts are okay but private school recruitment is bad. Even though it's basically the same thing. Got it.
 

TitanClone

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Take it from me (someone who went to both private and public), I was around those unmotivated kids. They bullied the S*** out of me everyday. They crushed my self-esteem. Kids are like chameleons, they will transform into their surroundings.

As for the "real world", I don't want my kids to have to live that. I don't have kids yet, but I'm never going to send them into a coal mine or the ghetto to get some "real world" experience. Yes, they'll have jobs so they can learn the value of money and working with others, but that is a gamble for them just to get some real world experience.

That is my point of view from my experience. I'm sorry if I sound like an elitest D*uchebag.
You don't.

Completely agree with not wanting your kid to end up in bad places, my point is issues exist. Mental health issues exists in private schools, public schools, rich communities, poor communities, etc... To me the more diversity at a young age the better and I think public schools are more likely to offer that.

Bullying will unfortunately always be an issue but from my (anecdotal) experience our school was pretty good in the sense of the cool football player shutting up the dumba** bully when they went after the shy kid.
 

qwerty

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So I wasted Years of my childhood up to like age 14 doing something I could have done in a day?
RCIA is an intensive 6-8 month program that culminates in the sacraments in a short period. Not exactly a splash and dash ceremony.
 

TitanClone

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SERVICE HOURS
The goal of Dowling Catholic High School’s Christian Service Hour program is to ensure that students are seeking to serve the community, the world at large, and to see Christ in all people. Christian service is defined as that which takes us beyond a narrow concern for ourselves, and moves us to promote the common good and to uphold the human dignity of every person. In the end we are looking to serve those that are poor, vulnerable, or marginalized in the world around us.

Students must complete 80 hours of service for graduation and log them through the x2VOL website. Ten service hours, along with a 300-word Reflection Paper, must be completed during each semester. During the semester, theology teachers will keep track of hours and papers for their students; all hours and papers must be turned in by December 1st (fall semester) and May 1st (spring semester). Students taking a summer theology class will report hours during the first semester to the Director of Formation and Ministry.
I'm all for public schools promoting similar requirements.
 
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SEIOWA CLONE

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So mechanisms by which public schools are able to siphon off better athletes from their home districts are okay but private school recruitment is bad. Even though it's basically the same thing. Got it.
Which public schools are siphoning off the better athletes and sending them to one district? Its sure not happening in Des Moines because their male athletic teams outside of BB and T/F has sucked for years.

Whether you care to admit it or not, private schools have been going after the best athletes in their area for years. And its occurring all over the state. What is wrong with asking a Burlington ND or Holy Trinity to play up a class. It was not long ago that IC Regina was hammering 2A schools yearly, winning the football championship in that class, the year the 4A catholic school out of CR played Dowling for the championship their only lose of the season was to Regina. Now they are playing 1A football.
Davenport Assumption has dominated class 2A baseball for years, while playing a 4A regular season schedule. No one is saying their is not talent there, that they are not working hard, but lets give the smaller public schools the chance to win a championship also.
 

SEIOWA CLONE

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I'm all for public schools promoting similar requirements.
Many schools do require anywhere from 20 to 40 hours of community service as part of their graduation requirement. I know my local school district does, and so does the school that I teach at.