Coronavirus Coronavirus: In-Iowa General Discussion (Not Limited)

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CascadeClone

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"Horse auction" would legally fall into the essential business definition of "agriculture." Legally, they could do that in most states with SIP orders. Smart? No. Complies with Proclamation/SIP orders? Yes.

It's almost like the letter of the law and it's intent are not completely aligned. Has that ever happened before?
 

Statefan10

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https://www.desmoinesregister.com/s...its-for-hospitalization-outbreaks/5111747002/

So somehow someone found out exactly how Iowa is deciding whether or not to issue an order. It's a point-based system depending on 4 factors.
  • Percentage of population greater than 65 years of age
  • Percent of identified cases requiring hospitalization
  • Infection rate per 100,000 population in the past 14 days
  • Number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities
Each of those factors is set on a scale to 3. 3 being the highest. The number Reynolds and her team is looking for would be at least 10. Since 12 is the highest, we'd have to be in pretty bad shape to get to 10 I would assume.

The Johnson County Board Supervisor said ""When I look at it, we'd be almost to Armageddon before she would issue (a shelter-in-place order)"
 

Clonefan32

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Kohl's apparently doesn't think it's essential because its stores are closed nationwide.

Scrubs are a great example of something that is necessary but people could go without buying for a short time or buy in some other way. There is no shortage, nor does the sale of scrubs stop when Kohl's closed its doors.

Those seem like easy loopholes to close in times like these.

Ok fine. They sell desks and lamps. Essential items to work at home. Exempt.

What you are asking for is essential a "know it when you see it" test, and that' impossible to legislate or enforce.
 

Acylum

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https://www.desmoinesregister.com/s...its-for-hospitalization-outbreaks/5111747002/

So somehow someone found out exactly how Iowa is deciding whether or not to issue an order. It's a point-based system depending on 4 factors.
  • Percentage of population greater than 65 years of age
  • Percent of identified cases requiring hospitalization
  • Infection rate per 100,000 population in the past 14 days
  • Number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities
Each of those factors is set on a scale to 3. 3 being the highest. The number Reynolds and her team is looking for would be at least 10. Since 12 is the highest, we'd have to be in pretty bad shape to get to 10 I would assume.

The Johnson County Board Supervisor said ""When I look at it, we'd be almost to Armageddon before she would issue (a shelter-in-place order)"
This has been known since Day 1 or so I think. Also how can you or the Johnson County guy assume we'd be at Armageddon before additional measures are taken if you don't know the criteria for each factor?
 

Statefan10

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Sorry, I scrolled too far and didn't see your link. But I still don't know what the cutoffs are.
No we do not. However when you look at the maximum, being a 12, which is obviously worst case, and we have to get to a 10, that doesn't seem to look too promising..
 

Acylum

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No we do not. However when you look at the maximum, being a 12, which is obviously worst case, and we have to get to a 10, that doesn't seem to look too promising..
Again, we can't know that without knowing the full criteria/cutoff point being used for each factor. If you want to say we should be informed of that, that's a fair argument.
 

Statefan10

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614 cases today (+65), 74 hospitalized (+12), 11 deaths (+2)
 

alarson

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Ankeny
Really? A lot of the places where people are staying within 2 miles are heavily rural counties where most people have to travel some for the essentials.

I live in one of those heavily rural, and also compliant counties, and the data is backing up what I see in person. Nobody on the roads, and just a general sense of emptiness outside grocery stores and gas stations. People moving around on foot, but pretty much staying home.

It's a question of degree.

We are seeing decreases, yes. But not to the degree that other states that have enacted more formal policies have. That will cost us.
 
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