Can anyone become a farmer?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by mtowncyclone13, Oct 20, 2019.

  1. farminclone

    farminclone Well-Known Member

    Nov 16, 2009
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    I think many are still diversified, it just looks different today than it did 40 years ago. Livestock used to be the way to diversify, but today you have diversification through full-time non-farm jobs, trucking, tiling, excavating, manure pumping, selling seed/chem, selling crop insurance, custom spray foam business, custom farming, rental houses/apartments, and in addition to that some operations did keep livestock around.

    All the enterprises listed above are first-hand examples of farmers diversifying their operations and keeping their labor busy year-round. The only one's that are crop-only guys here either have a ton of acres or have a paid-for land base.
     
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  2. 4theCYcle

    4theCYcle Well-Known Member

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    I would almost bet there would be a fair number of farmers that get into it. I'm pretty sure I had talked to a guy last year that was interested in the hemp industry at one point and sat in on a couple meetings just to learn what it took and the potential opportunity with it.
     
  3. Tre4ISU

    Tre4ISU Well-Known Member

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    Sure. I guess I was strictly talking about diversification in farming rather than diversified income.
     
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  4. Tre4ISU

    Tre4ISU Well-Known Member

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    The problem is that unless we get a decent textile market going, the market will be flooded immediately. Think about how big the people operation is that grow weed. Now think about someone growing even just 80 or 160 acres.

    Textiles are where it can be really good for farmers IMO.
     
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  5. bannedman

    bannedman Well-Known Member

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    can we turn it into ethanol and can the gov give them subsidies for it
     
  6. LincolnWay187

    LincolnWay187 Well-Known Member

    Sep 24, 2012
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    Couldnt the government limit the number of people allowed to grow weed by granting licenses? You would think that would cause the other commodity prices to go up too right? Again, i am talking out my ass here.
     
  7. mtowncyclone13

    mtowncyclone13 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2012
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    This is what I don't understand. This entire thread is about how difficult, if not impossible it would be, and then go on to state why you basically need to be born or marry into farming. If the demographics are stacked against it so much why aren't their programs out there to get people into farming? We subsidize training for all sorts of other things, but not getting into farming? Farmers want people to take over their operations but only at top dollar. The only ones who can afford it are corporations or existing wealthy farmers. it just seems so backwards that we complain about farmers being so old yet put in roadblocks that make it so young people can't get into it.
     
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  8. farminclone

    farminclone Well-Known Member

    Nov 16, 2009
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    There are beginning farmer loan programs through the USDA to help young farmers get started. They offer credit to people who wouldn't qualify for conventional loans, and offer low interest rates to help.

    There isn't and will never be a shortage of farmers. Fewer people will be involved in farming, but advances in technology more than make up the difference.
     
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  9. LincolnWay187

    LincolnWay187 Well-Known Member

    Sep 24, 2012
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    The farm credit system(fcs of america in iowa) are at least tracked on how many young farmers, minority, etc loans they give and are encouraged to do that. The whole point of their system is to lend to ag because back in the day commercial bankers weren't giving farmers loans. They're basically a government sponsored entity.
     
  10. dbodeenisudm

    dbodeenisudm Well-Known Member

    Oct 26, 2006
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    ban weed and give a monopoly to the farmers to grow hemp.
    cbd oil is better for the people to use instead of the weed too.
    weed wont be grown in fields.
    hemp can and will be grown in fields.

    thats what i have been telling someone who has the ear for the governor.
    i would recommend people lobby for the same.
     
  11. Tre4ISU

    Tre4ISU Well-Known Member

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    There are programs for things that aren't of consequence. Right now, you can't just go buy land and start. That's where maybe the most advantageous program is. It doesn't really matter what terms or interest is when you can't make it pencil no matter what. It comes down to finding the right growers who are looking to retire and who want to see young people take it over at an almost certain expense to themselves. Those guys are out there, no doubt. The people that are the barrier are people who are heir to the above mentioned, who haven't been around the farm and look at the land as simply an investment with ROI being the only thing that matters. It's hard for someone to pay higher cash rent when they don't have acres to spread out costs.

    So in regard to your old farmers comment, those guys aren't the problem in terms of this "problem." It's their kids or heirs who don't have any attachment to the farm as seen by their lack of interest in farming. I don't blame them at all so calling them a "problem" may not be fair.
     
  12. Tre4ISU

    Tre4ISU Well-Known Member

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    Again, I don't think that market will be a huge deal. Get into textiles, where we are producing pretty much everything from hemp species and I think we have something including a renewable source for a lot of **** we use every day.
     
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  13. Kyle James

    Kyle James New Member

    Oct 2, 2019
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    This is America. You can do anything you want to. That is what makes America Great!
     
  14. ArgentCy

    ArgentCy Well-Known Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Capital, Capital, Capital. This isn't a job, it is starting and running your own business. And not a very good business at that. I blame government programs and taxation that have severely messed with the market. That and lots of international competition.
     
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  15. CYdTracked

    CYdTracked Well-Known Member

    Mar 23, 2006
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    This is why I get frustrated when people rip on farmers for the subsidies they get or blame them for other various things people like to turn into political issues. It's hard enough already for those who were born into a farming family to keep the family farm alive and hope someone in the next generation has the passion to farm and continue on. As people have already pointed out unless you are already wealthy or have someone that is that wants to invest it's damn near impossible for someone to start from scratch and be able to make a living doing it. Those subsidies may be keeping some of those family farms from going under.

    Think about it for a second, how many of us have jobs we depend on to pay the bills that something as simple as the weather can dictate how much money you are able to earn on a given year with a lot of overhead costs that you still have to pay the bills on regardless. Your crop yield is directly impacted by the weather then you also have the fluctuating markets that some years you may get a great price and others you may actually lose money on. Even decent farm equipment you are going to go quite a bit into depth if you want to buy it outright or you can lease too but just like a car lease eventually you'll have to turn it back in or opt in to purchase it when your lease is up. How many jobs require you to own a piece of equipment that costs a quarter million or more (a combine) that you only use maybe 2 months out of the year? Then when one of those pieces of equipment breaks down how expensive it sometimes can be to repair plus it may set you back several days of being able to get work done too.

    My wife's father and brother farm and I grew up in a family that raises a small herd of cattle that was a secondary income to my dad's full time job so when I see people make outrageous remarks about how good farmers have it I just shake my head because I've seen first hand how even with the benefit of someone being born into a family that farms that it's still a tough occupation with all the long hours, expenses, and variables that are constantly changing. If it was such a lucrative and easy occupation you'd see a lot more people of all backgrounds wanting to get into it.
     
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  16. Tre4ISU

    Tre4ISU Well-Known Member

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    I just simply don't agree with this.

    It's got it's ebs and flows but the "whoa is us" farm stuff tends to wear on me. It's stressful, sure, and you have little control over a lot of things but you also have control of a lot of things.
     
  17. Tre4ISU

    Tre4ISU Well-Known Member

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    On subsidies: I'm fine getting rid of the majority of them, however, also get rid of the subsidies for competitors if that's an issue. The only thing that bugs me about the subsidy talk is that the subsidies mostly only level the playing field. Really, the only one that I think is helpful to farmers in the long run is the insurance program but even that is a food price control apparatus to some extent.
     
  18. ArgentCy

    ArgentCy Well-Known Member

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    I'm not in the business. Just judging from the outside. It is not a very good business. Lots off farms don't make money. As someone said before it has a very low ROI partially due to the costs involved. It's kinda like the Restaurant business, very few make it but there certainly are lots of business's that have made good money.
     
  19. Rural

    Rural Well-Known Member

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    40 acres and a mule.
     
  20. Tre4ISU

    Tre4ISU Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, well, let's take a gander of what they live in and drive and how the retired live. It's kind of like teachers. They are always underpaid yet the vast majority have a nice house, with nice vehicles and have a good retirement life, sometimes really early.
     

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