Brett McMurphy article on possibilities for 2020 football season

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Some good stuff in here.

The College Football Playoff semifinals and title game held in May – or even June.

A nine-game regular season.

Universities allowing student-athletes – but not the entire student body – back on campus to participate in games played in empty stadiums.

This very well could be the immediate future of college football, according to 112 Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) athletic directors contacted by Stadium.
 
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Acylum

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"While the athletic directors stress that the safety and health of student-athletes is paramount, the ADs also realize how critical it is financially for the universities and athletic programs to have a football season once an “all-clear” is given for life to return to normal."

If this is the case, why would there be no fans and no students on campus?
 

Sigmapolis

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"While the athletic directors stress that the safety and health of student-athletes is paramount, the ADs also realize how critical it is financially for the universities and athletic programs to have a football season once an “all-clear” is given for life to return to normal."

If this is the case, why would there be no fans and no students on campus?

TV buxx $$$
 

intrepid27

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Quote from Article:
But that could get tricky.

For one, there are 32 conference games involving the Power Five conferences in the month of September that would have to be moved to October or November. Then there’s the difference in number of conference games. The Big 12, Big Ten and Pac-12 all play nine league games, while the ACC and SEC only play eight. All of the Group of Five leagues have eight conference games
.

That's easily solved. Tell the SEC and ACC to quit being pu$$!@s
 

alarson

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Some good stuff in here.

The College Football Playoff semifinals and title game held in May – or even June.

A nine-game regular season.

Universities allowing student-athletes – but not the entire student body – back on campus to participate in games played in empty stadiums.

This very well could be the immediate future of college football, according to 112 Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) athletic directors contacted by Stadium.

9 games seems like a mess both for determining the playyoff field but also for independents and G5 who need the scheduling with P5 teams who may have 9 game conference schedules. Plus taking away large OOC rivalries.

Its tricky for sure.

If we're discussing holding games without crowds anyway, a lot of options open up for scheduling at neutral sites. The big 12, having a lot of southern footprint, could run a winter schedule if all games were moved to texas-either at schools or at true neutral sites like ATT stadium\Alamodome. The big 10 doesnt have that option, but it could schedule a bunch of games in indoor venues in Detroit, Indianapolis, and Minneapolis.
 
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CapnCy

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"While the athletic directors stress that the safety and health of student-athletes is paramount, the ADs also realize how critical it is financially for the universities and athletic programs to have a football season once an “all-clear” is given for life to return to normal."

If this is the case, why would there be no fans and no students on campus?

My guess is that may be athletes getting back a hint earlier (camp, if you will) and the overall fanless games would be to limit huge gatherings.

If this all happens this way, SUPER difficult for NCAA/schools to claim it's not about money (and believe me, I understand football pays for all, if you will).

Also, what happens when a player gets COVID and a whole team gets it (which could happen).
 

Acylum

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That's the problem right now- they're not recommending masks because there are already shortages. I'm confident that these shortages will be made up by new production in the next 8 weeks.
I've tried to imagine a world with everybody walking around with masks. Glad I'm not a bank teller or cashier .
 
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coolerifyoudid

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"While the athletic directors stress that the safety and health of student-athletes is paramount, the ADs also realize how critical it is financially for the universities and athletic programs to have a football season once an “all-clear” is given for life to return to normal."

If this is the case, why would there be no fans and no students on campus?

My guess is they are hoping to be able to detect the presence of COVID-19 well enough (even in asymptomatic people) and plan on utilizing team physicians and other means to regulate smaller groups. I assume it's just one option being thrown around at this point.

(I know you weren't arguing this next point. I'm merely tacking on my opinion). It's not a horrible plan B or C versus forfeiting all of the revenue by not having the season. I wouldn't want to be on any committee that gives this thing the "all-clear". Conservative estimates will probably not be conservative enough .
 

Gunnerclone

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So what number do we need to hit for deaths or cases for people to get that there’s not going to be football this fall?
 
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weR138

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9 games seems like a mess both for determining the playyoff field but also for independents and G5 who need the scheduling with P5 teams who may have 9 game conference schedules. Plus taking away large OOC rivalries.

Its tricky for sure.

If we're discussing holding games without crowds anyway, a lot of options open up for scheduling at neutral sites. The big 12, having a lot of southern footprint, could run a winter schedule if all games were moved to texas-either at schools or at true neutral sites like ATT stadium\Alamodome. The big 10 doesnt have that option, but it could schedule a bunch of games in indoor venues in Detroit, Indianapolis, and Minneapolis.

The only problem I see is for independents (boo hoo ND).

G5 has a fully separate season from P5 and play only conference games.

It sucks, but it's just one season. I say we just push the season back an do conference games only. I'm mostly concerned with getting back to normal asap and it seems like cutting off the front end of the 2020 season would do that the best.
 

CloniesForLife

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So what number do we need to hit for deaths or cases for people to get that there’s not going to be football this fall?
While I agree right now it may not look good there is a lot we could learn and a lot that could happen between now and the fall that may make this thing easier to control.
 
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alarson

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"While the athletic directors stress that the safety and health of student-athletes is paramount, the ADs also realize how critical it is financially for the universities and athletic programs to have a football season once an “all-clear” is given for life to return to normal."

If this is the case, why would there be no fans and no students on campus?


The danger in this virus is, in large part, about how it can spread quickly and overwhelm our healthcare system. A 60,000 person crowd? One person could infect a ****ton of people there. A couple hundred guys at a football game? Much lower risk. If one gets it, theyre A) not going to spread it to many, and B) generally in the lowest of risk groups, and C) easier to test that relatively small number regularly and isolate any who turn up positive (you'll never test all 60,000 people entering JTS on a saturday morning, obviously)
 
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Acylum

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The danger in this virus is, in large part, about how it can spread quickly and overwhelm our healthcare system. A 60,000 person crowd? One person could infect a fuckton of people there. A couple hundred guys at a football game? Much lower risk. If one gets it, theyre A) not going to spread it to many, and B) generally in the lowest of risk groups, and C) easier to test that relatively small number regularly and isolate any who turn up positive (you'll never test all 60,000 people entering JTS on a saturday morning, obviously)
Just to be clear to those responding to my post, I'm asking why would there be no crowds allowed at games or no non -football playing students allowed back on campus once an "all clear" to return to life as normal has been given.
 

madguy30

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I've tried to imagine a world with everybody walking around with masks. Glad I'm not a bank teller or cashier .

If I go into a store with a bandanna over my nose and mouth, and the clerk freaks out and tells me just to take everything and leave, just don't hurt them, and I made no threats, I mean, is it actually robbery if I follow their directions?
 

alarson

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Just to be clear to those responding to my post, I'm asking why would there be no crowds allowed at games or no non -football playing students allowed back on campus once an "all clear" to return to life as normal has been given.

I guess it depends what the message given has been.

Its likely it'll be phased in reverse order to how some of this came down, and things like stadium-size crowds will be some of the last things to be allowed again, even once we're living somewhat 'normal' lives again with regards to things like going to work (which, to many people, will be their 'all clear')