Bigger Impact on college Football, COVID or Racism?

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Clonehomer

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Apr 11, 2006
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What's going to have the bigger Impact on college football this fall, COVID or fallout from the racial unrest?

Now that young black people have been emboldened to speak up for themselves, I can't imagine this is going to go well for a lot of coaching staffs. We've seen the issues at Iowa, Clemson, FSU. How long before more issues come out? Will protests such as we've seen carry over to the college game?

Then you obviously have the COVID mess. 5 players involved in a 50 person workout at Alabama test positive. OSU has had a number of players test positive as well as a few here at ISU. If this continues into the fall, how often will we see players missing games for being quarantined? How many coaches would sit a asymptomatic star player that tests positive?
 

clonedude

Well-Known Member
Apr 16, 2006
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The NCAA would never cancel a season for racism.... so unless all the black players just refused to show up to practice and held out.... there would still be a season.

If Covid gets bad enough.... there won't be a season. And if things keep on going the pace they are now... this is getting more and more likely.
 

mj4cy

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Mar 28, 2006
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Iowa
The NCAA would never cancel a season for racism.... so unless all the black players just refused to show up to practice and held out.... there would still be a season.

If Covid gets bad enough.... there won't be a season. And if things keep on going the pace they are now... this is getting more and more likely.
Can you elaborate? The rate of seven day moving average of new cases has been decreasing for weeks now in Iowa. Hospitalizations and ICU patients are on the decline as well. Not sure how other states are, but what pace are you speaking to?
 

Sousaclone

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Apr 29, 2006
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Can you elaborate? The rate of seven day moving average of new cases has been decreasing for weeks now in Iowa. Hospitalizations and ICU patients are on the decline as well. Not sure how other states
are, but what pace are you speaking to?
Has Iowa opened back up? Texas was going down, but has shot back up like a rocket ship recently. Granted, Iowa has a significantly smaller population and its much more disbursed than Texas.

As to the OP, COVID will be what shuts down sports. Unless there is massive unified front, there won't be anything. There may be a lot of protests/demonstrations (I'm waiting for the first team/person to not play for 9 minutes), but the games would continue.
 

madguy30

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Nov 15, 2011
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Can you elaborate? The rate of seven day moving average of new cases has been decreasing for weeks now in Iowa. Hospitalizations and ICU patients are on the decline as well. Not sure how other states are, but what pace are you speaking to?
I'd think it would need to be on a downslide nationally for having college football to be successful which it has been. How much lower imo is a key question. I was looking at something the other day that was a good reference to see different states' hospital info but can't find it now of course.

https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/data/new-cases

RE: OP the virus has a better chance of shutting down CFB unless there is a mass exodus of players or something, which I'm not sure happens as that's losing the platform and a chance at communication.
 

mj4cy

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Has Iowa opened back up? Texas was going down, but has shot back up like a rocket ship recently. Granted, Iowa has a significantly smaller population and its much more disbursed than Texas.

As to the OP, COVID will be what shuts down sports. Unless there is massive unified front, there won't be anything. There may be a lot of protests/demonstrations (I'm waiting for the first team/person to not play for 9 minutes), but the games would continue.
Iowa began opening things up 2-3 weeks ago. Pretty much now everything is open but with restrictions (50% restaurant capacity ect)
 

alarson

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Mar 15, 2006
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Iowa began opening things up 2-3 weeks ago. Pretty much now everything is open but with restrictions (50% restaurant capacity ect)
Which still disregards why large events were barred in the first place.

Large events, and especially very large events like football games, are extermely high risk for spread. That risk isn't going down, at all, and will remain a risk to kick off large spread\outbreak this fall if ignored.

Amazing how people still don't get this.
 

mj4cy

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Which still disregards why large events were barred in the first place.

Large events, and especially very large events like football games, are extermely high risk for spread. That risk isn't going down, at all, and will remain a risk to kick off large spread\outbreak this fall if ignored.

Amazing how people still don't get this.
And people have the choice not to go. There is a whole thread on this already. No one has said there won't be a risk.
 

GrappleCy

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Aug 7, 2018
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Which still disregards why large events were barred in the first place.

Large events, and especially very large events like football games, are extermely high risk for spread. That risk isn't going down, at all, and will remain a risk to kick off large spread\outbreak this fall if ignored.

Amazing how people still don't get this.
We're also learning more and, at least right now, it seems like outside events have a much lower risk. If you'd asked me a month ago I would have thought we'd have an empty stadium. But now I think that if there is football played the stands will be partially full, though reduced from usual. The question is gonna be whether schools can consistently field a team because there's gonna be outbreaks and, even though football players are a low risk group there's well over 10,000 college football players out there plus thousands of higher risk coaches, somebody is gonna get a bad roll of the dice and pass from this during the season. But is it gonna be a high profile player or coach that gets a bunch of attention? Or is it gonna be a third string guy on an FCS roster?
 

alarson

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And people have the choice not to go. There is a whole thread on this already. No one has said there won't be a risk.
Again proving you don't get it. Des[ite it being explained to you dozens of times. It doesnt matter if people choose not to go when everyone is affected if a large event kicks off rapid community spread. Amazing how you can't see beyond your own nose.
 

alarson

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Mar 15, 2006
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We're also learning more and, at least right now, it seems like outside events have a much lower risk.
Only with distancing and other precautions such as masks required. A packed stadium remains massively high risk.

If you'd asked me a month ago I would have thought we'd have an empty stadium. But now I think that if there is football played the stands will be partially full, though reduced from usual. The question is gonna be whether schools can consistently field a team because there's gonna be outbreaks and, even though football players are a low risk group there's well over 10,000 college football players out there plus thousands of higher risk coaches, somebody is gonna get a bad roll of the dice and pass from this during the season. But is it gonna be a high profile player or coach that gets a bunch of attention? Or is it gonna be a third string guy on an FCS roster?
The greater risk has always been broader community spread. But enough people can't seem to get this that we're going to go ahead full steam with this, accelerate community spread, and kill people who weren't even at the games because of it.
 

madguy30

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Nov 15, 2011
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Again proving you don't get it. Des[ite it being explained to you dozens of times. It doesnt matter if people choose not to go when everyone is affected if a large event kicks off rapid community spread. Amazing how you can't see beyond your own nose.
The next month or so will give a very good indication as to how effective large outdoor events, with lots of physical contact and lots of people being very close together, and yelling in unison are.
 
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mj4cy

Asst. Regional Manager
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Mar 28, 2006
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Again proving you don't get it. Des[ite it being explained to you dozens of times. It doesnt matter if people choose not to go when everyone is affected if a large event kicks off rapid community spread. Amazing how you can't see beyond your own nose.
I'm glad we have people like you to remind us that since we don't think like you we are wrong.

You act like there will be no other large events held if ISU or college football does not happen. It's going to happen one way or another. Going to the store to get essentials is a risk. Unfortunately we have to live with this virus and yes its important to be smart and minimize risk, but there is risk in our everyday lives. Pollard has at least admitted these things and you won't be penalized for choosing not to go. At least they're trying to go about it in the most safe way as possible yet be clear with information in advance.

People that choose not to go are also probably the people who would avoid others who have been in a large gatherings. My family is still in that mode. We've only been around an extremely small amount of people in effort to error on the safe side. I may not even go to the games myself but will decide as time gets closer.
 

mj4cy

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We're also learning more and, at least right now, it seems like outside events have a much lower risk. If you'd asked me a month ago I would have thought we'd have an empty stadium. But now I think that if there is football played the stands will be partially full, though reduced from usual. The question is gonna be whether schools can consistently field a team because there's gonna be outbreaks and, even though football players are a low risk group there's well over 10,000 college football players out there plus thousands of higher risk coaches, somebody is gonna get a bad roll of the dice and pass from this during the season. But is it gonna be a high profile player or coach that gets a bunch of attention? Or is it gonna be a third string guy on an FCS roster?
Yep. I'm more nervous going back to church than I'd be at a football game.
 

madguy30

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Yep. I'm more nervous going back to church than I'd be at a football game.
I think if I were to go to a football game I'd make sure I got in to the stadium early and then either leave early or wait until the crowd clears out to leave. Depends on the stadium maybe...some common areas are pretty wide open aired while others are basically hallways.
 
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alarson

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I'm glad we have people like you to remind us that since we don't think like you we are wrong.
No, you're wrong because you've been wrong from the start, continually proved wrong, and yet here you are, wrong again. You've denied science all the way along, yet still don't have the self-awareness to course correct. You repeatedly frame things in terms of your own selfish personal risk instead of the risks posed on a societal level.

You act like there will be no other large events held if ISU or college football does not happen. It's going to happen one way or another. Going to the store to get essentials is a risk. Unfortunately we have to live with this virus and yes its important to be smart and minimize risk, but there is risk in our everyday lives
This is moronic. There are levels of risk. This whole thing is about managing risk, and not just on an individual level but on a societal one. Going to the store, especially if people are wearing masks (which pollard has stupidly said will not be required) being far less than a large event where large numbers of people can be infected quickly .

. Pollard has at least admitted these things and you won't be penalized for choosing not to go. At least they're trying to go about it in the most safe way as possible yet be clear with information in advance.
The most safe way possible would be to just have no fans. Which is what should be done. Again, its not about 'choosing whether to go' . PEOPLE NOT AT THE GAME ARE PUT AT RISK BY THE GAME BEING HELD WITH TENS OF THOUSANDS OF FANS.
 

cygrads

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Jul 27, 2007
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If thinks keep on going the pace they are now.... we'll see the state open outdoor public venues to >50% capacity and JTS packed full on Saturdays.
Has the South Korean baseball and European soccer leagues allowed attendance yet? Seems like South Korea started schools back up and immediately had spikes in cases. If these countries that are weeks if not months ahead of the U.S. and are not allowing attendance it would be surprising to see us take that chance.
 

mj4cy

Asst. Regional Manager
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Mar 28, 2006
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No, you're wrong because you've been wrong from the start, continually proved wrong, and yet here you are, wrong again. You've denied science all the way along, yet still don't have the self-awareness to course correct. You repeatedly frame things in terms of your own selfish personal risk instead of the risks posed on a societal level.



This is moronic. There are levels of risk. This whole thing is about managing risk, and not just on an individual level but on a societal one. Going to the store, especially if people are wearing masks (which pollard has stupidly said will not be required) being far less than a large event where large numbers of people can be infected quickly .



The most safe way possible would be to just have no fans. Which is what should be done. Again, its not about 'choosing whether to go' . PEOPLE NOT AT THE GAME ARE PUT AT RISK BY THE GAME BEING HELD WITH TENS OF THOUSANDS OF FANS.

Thanks for getting mad during a discussion. I still think you are a good dude. How have I been proved wrong? Just stating my opinions and many others have agreed if youve read the other thread.

Totally respect you disagree and I appreciate your passion on the subject. Obviously I am no expert but still have thoughts on the subject. How have I denied science? In the other thread and this one Ive made claims based on data from the science in testing, data, trends and calculaltions.

People will be at risk no matter what while the virus still exists. Maybe having a football game will accerlate it. We have more time yet to gather data and see how the trends are looking come September. We might get a glimpse of case study from mass gatherings outdoors in the next couple weeks based on all of the protests recently. Obviously it wont be apples to apples.
 

Billups06

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Apr 18, 2006
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The NCAA would never cancel a season for racism.... so unless all the black players just refused to show up to practice and held out.... there would still be a season.

If Covid gets bad enough.... there won't be a season. And if things keep on going the pace they are now... this is getting more and more likely.
I'm genuinely curious, what are you seeing/reading that is indicative of the situation worsening? Daily national cases, as with Iowa, seem to be trending in a positive direction.