Another Funding Cut

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by cyclone87, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. carvers4math

    carvers4math Well-Known Member

    Mar 15, 2012
    12,521
    1,172
    113
    Or do things like staff prisons. They haven't been fully staffed for years and it continues to get worse. By the time they gut their benefits, not sure why anyone would even take a job there, the less staffing, the greater chance of being assaulted.
     
  2. cyclone87

    cyclone87 Well-Known Member

    Apr 6, 2011
    2,271
    51
    48
    Grad Assistant
    Ames, IA
    Yep, last year ISU received the largest amount of research funding ever. I would think that might drop off quite a bit. As I don't think R&D will be a big priority of the current administration. Could be a double whammy for ISU.
     
  3. mtowncyclone13

    mtowncyclone13 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2012
    15,595
    789
    113
    grundy center
    No offense intended, but according to national statistics the average starting salary for new graduates is about $50k. With engineers over $60 and education around $35.
     
  4. mdk2isu

    mdk2isu Well-Known Member

    Jan 30, 2013
    2,944
    404
    83
    Male
    Not of this World
    I said DM area. You, know, that area close to ISU's campus that has repeatedly been ranked in the top 5 places for young professionals, to raise a family, etc. over the past few years.

    Seeing as we want to keep graduates in state, I don't really care how much the national average is because the national average cost of living is a lot higher than it is in DM. I would hope that in places with significantly higher cost of living would have higher starting wages. That also has no bearing on the statistics that I stated about DM.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  5. mdk2isu

    mdk2isu Well-Known Member

    Jan 30, 2013
    2,944
    404
    83
    Male
    Not of this World
    Why do you say that? Because schools will tell you that when you graduate you will make X amount? Sorry to share info from someone in the industry that doesn't align with the rosy picture that was painted for you by your school of choice.
     
    • Disagree Disagree x 2
    • Funny Funny x 1
  6. mtowncyclone13

    mtowncyclone13 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2012
    15,595
    789
    113
    grundy center
    My source is the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Yours is a buddy who works in staffing. No offense intended, but I have a hard time believing an anecdote when the lowest paid BS degree, teaching, starts out higher than what you've quoted. Education is always on the bottom of the income list yet it's much higher than your quoted wage. How is this possible? Do you have any chamber of commerce data? Or DSM Economic Development data, etc? We could do a quick poll on CF for new grads in the DSM area and their starting salary would be over $30k.

    This isn't a personal argument about you, it's trying to find hard, quantifiable data to back up the numbers.

    Year after year, even with tuition increases, college grads overwhelmingly make more money than non-grads.
     
  7. CyArob

    CyArob Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2011
    26,646
    1,588
    113
    Staff Writer
    MN
    I think you did it wrong then. Almost everyone I know from Minnesota that went to Iowa State had scholarships that made it cheaper than going to the U of M.
     
  8. carvers4math

    carvers4math Well-Known Member

    Mar 15, 2012
    12,521
    1,172
    113
    Son has a friend who recently graduated basically with some degree for her dream job for working as staff at some youth camp. He thought she was nuts with loans she took out for that job, but even that job started her at $30,000.
     
  9. cowgirl836

    cowgirl836 Well-Known Member

    Sep 3, 2009
    31,749
    1,848
    113

    there is definitely no OOS reciprocity that I came across but there were academic scholarships available that made going to ISU competitive with what IL in-state would have cost me. Plus the program I wanted was more renowned.
     
  10. cowgirl836

    cowgirl836 Well-Known Member

    Sep 3, 2009
    31,749
    1,848
    113

    when I looked at establishing residency, you had to live in the state for a year without simultaneously attending college.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. mtowncyclone13

    mtowncyclone13 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2012
    15,595
    789
    113
    grundy center
    I guess I did it wrong, then. It would have been cheaper for me to go to the local private Catholic university because of legacy benefits but I didn't want to stay that close to home. That was over a decade ago so things may have changed
     
  12. mtowncyclone13

    mtowncyclone13 Well-Known Member

    Oct 10, 2012
    15,595
    789
    113
    grundy center
    I know that. I'm just complaining that everything I do now I did then. Everything except own a house. Yet now I'm a resident and then I wasn't. I spoke to my dad after graduation and he said "I should have just bought a house for you to live in for a year" because both my sister and I went from MN to ISU. He probably would have saved money in the long run. But my point remains, I consider my higher tuition costs as my "donations" to ISU over my adult life.
     
  13. mdk2isu

    mdk2isu Well-Known Member

    Jan 30, 2013
    2,944
    404
    83
    Male
    Not of this World
    What about all the liberal arts majors? Or history majors? Or sociology, women's studies, art, fashion, etc.? Where do they fall on the income list since none of them fall into a particular job field? Or those students that get a degree and cant find a job?

    I'm sure if you look hard enough, you will be able to find the info. I don't have any specific links, but I trust the person I got the info from.
     
  14. cowgirl836

    cowgirl836 Well-Known Member

    Sep 3, 2009
    31,749
    1,848
    113

    I didn't mention this in the Leath threads because it's a bit cavey, but this one is more appropriate, I think. Wasn't a big fan of Leath but he at least seemed to be on good terms with state political leaders. I sincerely hope the new President is able to maintain that relationship because it isn't pretty when the state government decides to show outright hostility toward their higher education institutions.

    I dislike the vocationalization of universities that many state governments are pushing. University should not be purely about turning out workers for corporations. They are not tech schools. It should be about turning out well-rounded citizens for the community as well. The hate on anything that's not STEM or a direct vocation is unhealthy.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  15. MeowingCows

    MeowingCows Well-Known Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    5,286
    719
    113
    Male
    The OhIowa State University
    It's worth noting that all of those degrees you mentioned have comparatively very low enrollment rates at large institutions. The only places where "liberal arts" degrees are really prevalent are community colleges (and then generally used as a stepping stone to another degree).

    I can't imagine the average salary around DSM being under $30k. I've found in my searches that DSM pays reasonably well for educated workers. For example, I know ISU Business tends to see a lot of grads go the DDSM-area (not all of course), and they claim most recently that the average starting salary across all business school majors is $47k.
     
  16. BCClone

    BCClone Well-Known Member

    Sep 4, 2011
    9,652
    918
    113
    North Iowa
    If you think tl/dr, i do summarize the thought in the last paragraph

    My main issue with the state schools (yes I'm old so I'm going of 94 and definitely inform me of what is different) is their seeming idea of well rounded when I went to school was more uppidity than community oriented.

    I grew up with parents and friends who believed in giving back to the community. We were active in things outside of our school that directly helped the community. Being on town betterment boards, running local events, helping with fundraiser. When I got to ISU, I never once had an advisor or instructor mention this as important. Instead, I was told that the world geography class or the english class that taught me the nuances of when to serve and drink which kind of wine was making me more well rounded and a better citizen. That same English class taught me how to dine when you have the 18 forks, 4 spoons and how to place my utensils to indicate im just pausing or finished with that course. I don't care if someone uses the wrong spoon or God forbid keeps a fork from their appetizer and uses it with their salad. I'm interested in where their passion and heart lies, how can we make this a better place for our kids, parents or just community members.

    Community service and volunterrism was not stressed to me or my friends I had in college. I believe that what many schools think make you a better community member doesn't. I did have advisors tell me to be in the ag Bus club or NAMA or etc, but it was followed with, it will look good on your resume, instead of you need to give back for what others have helped to already build. The clubs I did join typically were concerned in fundraising to take trips to either competitions or conferences, in all those years, I don't remember working around Ames or surrounding communities just to help out.

    It has been a while since I was there and things could have and hopefully have changed. Hopefully some sort of community work, such as soup kitchen, animal shelter or the such is required to show community volunteering is important.

    I guess I ran this rant to show why people my age kinda scoff at some of the "well rounded requirments" that schools require.
     
  17. ISUguy

    ISUguy Member

    Jun 27, 2006
    148
    10
    18
    Two things I can add...my daughter just applied to the U of M and to Iowa State. She got into both..both offered financial aide. Iowa State offered her a scholarship that was just enough to make the tuition more affordable than the U of M. So not technically reciprocity, it served the same purpose. As a kid from Nebraska, I took a year off to establish residency. I believe I could take up to 6 credits or something like that, so I took two classes and worked the rest of the time. Saved me several thousand dollars and I got to build up a nest egg from the money I earned working.
     
  18. cowgirl836

    cowgirl836 Well-Known Member

    Sep 3, 2009
    31,749
    1,848
    113
    and I didn't really have the same experience. My club did fundraising but also did work with local schools, once a month soup kitchen type thing - but that's not really what I was getting at. I'm talking more about the requirement to take Humanities and diversities classes and the like. People complain about having to take them and how they don't directly equal a job or don't help you in your pursuit of an engineering degree. But I think it's important that students come out of college with a basic understanding of the classics and not just the specific discipline they came to college for.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  19. BoxsterCy

    BoxsterCy Well-Known Member

    Sep 14, 2009
    18,302
    2,730
    113
    Living the Dream
    Minnesota
    No need for that since they can all just get jobs in all of the new Iowa coal mines. :rolleyes:
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
  20. StClone

    StClone Well-Known Member

    Dec 17, 2009
    2,237
    79
    48
    Wisconsin

Share This Page