Why does the Wildcat work so often?

Discussion in 'Football' started by BKLYNCyclone, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. BKLYNCyclone

    BKLYNCyclone Well-Known Member

    Sep 16, 2007
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    I don't get it... 95% of the time I see a team line up in the Wildcat formation, they run it off tackle for a 10 yard plus gain. Why is the wildcat so hard to defend? Is there an extra blocker in the formation? (i.e. not a wussy quarterback trying to lay in a crappy cutblock)

    It seems to me that the wildcat formation severely tips one's hand on what play the offense is running. I would assume this would allow the defense to key in on the play and defend it better....

    Can anyone explain this to me?
     
  2. BKLYNCyclone

    BKLYNCyclone Well-Known Member

    Sep 16, 2007
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    Oh, and thank you to Jesse Smith for stuffing that last one and throwing the big paw of his on the ball!
     
  3. rworkman83

    rworkman83 Lost in Eastern Iowa
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    Aug 9, 2006
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    Most of the time, it is going to be a run, but you also normally have two extra blockers in the back field. More times than not, the player in the Wildcat can also throw the ball, so that is something to be prepared for.
     
  4. Tank

    Tank Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2008
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    Defense's are still learning to stop it. That is why it works in both college and the NFL, b/c it is new. Give it time and allow DC's to look at stopping it better and it will just be another offensive formation.
     
  5. besserheimerphat

    besserheimerphat Well-Known Member

    Apr 11, 2006
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    There is a blocker for every defender, leaving only one person "assigned" to the ball carrier. If the blockers make their blocks and the last defender doesn't make the tackle... If the QB isn't a legitimate run threat, then the QB's defensive counterpart is allowed to double-up on the runningback unblocked.

    The defense has to be very disciplined and fundamentally sound at one-on-one tackling. Same as defending the option offense. I'd bet you could defend it well running man coverage with Cover 0, lots of guys in the box, but then you'd better hope that the offense has no ability to pass effectively out of it.
     
  6. Clonehomer

    Clonehomer Well-Known Member

    Apr 11, 2006
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    Can someone explain to me why in the wildcat they usually still have a QB in? In the NFL they seem to always split that QB out as far as they can. Why even put them on the field? I understand that it may be a little easier for the defense to predict the wildcat is coming, but with most QB's out there you are pretty much limiting yourself to 10 players on offense.
     
  7. gocy444

    gocy444 Well-Known Member

    Dec 15, 2008
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    Because Arnaud is probably one of the hardest players on the team to bring down. Other teams with slow QB's i dont know.
     
  8. besserheimerphat

    besserheimerphat Well-Known Member

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    I'd assume it's to keep from tipping your hand as long as possible. If the d-coordinator saw a QB coming off and an RB/TE/WR coming on, he'd have a chance to make a quick personnel change. If they give no indication of wildcat until they break the huddle, it's too late for the d to make substitutions. You could also argue that having the QB out wide gives an opportunity for a reverse pass, double pass, etc.
     

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