Road Bikes & Ragbrai Teams

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by BloodyBuddy, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. BloodyBuddy

    BloodyBuddy Well-Known Member

    Mar 13, 2012
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    #1 BloodyBuddy, Apr 9, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
    I am looking for a Road bike for Ragbrai in the $250-$300 range. Anyone have any opinions on this bike? 1980's steel frame. Will it be too heavy? Is price too high?

    I am a casual biker and am looking to do the whole week of Ragbrai for the 1st time.

    Also, anyone on here have a Ragbrai team with an open spot? I'm a 30 Year old, 190 lb, Casual Biker, decent shape, and I do like to do my share drinking. If you have a team I would fit in with, let me know. Like to go at my own pace, so I don't need to ride with the team the whole time.

    Vintage Trek 410/412?
     
  2. ISUKing

    ISUKing Member

    Apr 27, 2010
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    If you are a casual rider, you may want to worry about comfort more than weight. If you do RAGBRAI right (not rush from town to town) the physical part of it isn't too bad. I have a road bike alot like the one in your link that I have taken on 4-5 rides and it treats me well. I would say though, when I look to buy a new bike, I will probably look at a hybrid which keeps you sitting up straighter and doesn't hurt your back and shoulders as bad.

    Something like this:

    700 - Trek Bicycle
     
  3. VeloClone

    VeloClone Well-Known Member

    Jan 19, 2010
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    That bike should treat you very well. I rode my first couple of RAGBRAI's on my mountain bike with knobby tires. I rode the next couple on an old used steel trek not unlike that one. I found the upgrade quite satisfying. I would think for your price range an old steel roadie like this one should serve you quite well. I would encourage you to take a look at the bike and make sure the frame fits you before committing to buying. Poor frame fit, maladjusted seat and handlebars and inadequate time on the bike before the long days on RAGBRAI will contribute as much toward back, neck and shoulder pain as riding a road bike will.

    I'm sorry I can't invite you to join us, but our team and bus are full this year. First year with the new bus!

    Good luck!
     
  4. Wappadu

    Wappadu Member

    Feb 7, 2012
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    I rode a hybrid much like that one for two years on Ragbrai. Now that I've made the switch to a proper road bike, I won't ever go back. A road bike has a more aggressive riding position that puts more strain on the lower back, but I've found that having so many more handlebar spots open let me rest whichever area was getting tired. It's especially noticeable going up hills and into headwinds. My $.02.
     
  5. digZ

    digZ Well-Known Member

    Sep 2, 2011
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    #5 digZ, Apr 9, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
    Agreed, I used to ride a mountain bike around campus, then I rode a hybrid with an aluminium frame and carbon forks, and it felt like night and day compared to the mountain bike.

    Then I upgraded to a true road bike with a carbon fiber frame, and it's like night and day, even compared to an aluminium frame bike. Also a road bike compared to a hybrid will generally have much better shifting mechanisms , which is great for making quick adjustments during hilly sections, and when wind gusts kick up (which is very frequent in west and central Iowa, lol) without losing too much momentum, as well as more gears for different situations.

    Certainly you can do Ragbrai with any bike, as long as you aren't gunning it from town to town, but I would at the very least recommend a decent hybrid that has 8-10 speeds, and probably an aluminium frame. It will make it much easier on yourself.

    I really like the Trek FX 7 series of bikes.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/town/fitness/fx/7_2_fx/#

    This bike, for example, has an aluminum frame, and alloy forks, and 8 speeds. Would be a good bike for doing decently long rides, but isn't so aggressive as to turn away a beginner/intermediate rider.

    I understand that it's out of your price range, but it's a very nice bike, and is a very good tweener that would fit your purposes( aggressive enough for decently long rides, but comfortable enough for an intermediate rider)
     
  6. brianhos

    brianhos Moderator
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    Jun 1, 2006
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    #6 brianhos, Apr 9, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012

    I was going to by a 7, but then I rode my felt z85 and went with a road bike instead. For the record, I paid less than $1k for this:

    [​IMG]

    I would think you could get a trek 1.1 used or something like that for $500 or so. Or something new like: http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1094302_-1___400306
     
  7. digZ

    digZ Well-Known Member

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    Same shifters I have on my bike, pretty good deal you got on that one!
     
  8. CykoAGR

    CykoAGR Well-Known Member

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    You will see every bike brand style and age under the sun on RAGBRAI. And most of the time the people riding them are having fun. It has more to do with the person and how well they "trained" than the actual bike itself to a certian degree.

    I would echo what others have said as far as making sure that the bike fits you not the other way around. There is a clear difference between a mountian bike to hybrid to a road bike and the different quality of road bikes.

    I was pretty anti-cycling when I had a cheap (like walmart cheap) mountian bike but I took the plunge and bought a year old model of road bike from a bike shop and I have grown to LOVE cycling. If this one doesnt fit you just keep an eye out on CL there seems to be a lot on there.
     
  9. ketelmeister

    ketelmeister Well-Known Member

    Oct 24, 2006
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    #9 ketelmeister, Apr 9, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
    I bought two of these for adult family members and they like them a lot. You can find real deals at places like Erics Bikes and Scheels will match the price. Find it low on the internet, print it out and take it for a match.

    Should find for under $350.
     
  10. Cycl1

    Cycl1 Well-Known Member

    Mar 14, 2012
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    While i agree that fitness is huge, a road bike vs mountain bike is also a big diference. I have been on rides with my road bike, and the people on mountain bikes have to pedal down hill to keep up with me while i glide. It's not even fair.
     
  11. BloodyBuddy

    BloodyBuddy Well-Known Member

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    Everyone keeps saying that the fit of the bike is huge. Well, how do you determine fit? Is there a simple way I can do this. Or just jump on and test it out. Can't really go for a 60 mile test ride and see if the bike makes my back sore, so how do you go about this?
     
  12. VeloClone

    VeloClone Well-Known Member

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    Here is a website with great articles on how to make sure that the bike will fit you and how to tune it in to make sure you have an efficient and comfortable perch on your machine. It's not the end all be all, but it certainly is a good start.

    Articles » Steve Hogg's Bike Fitting Website
     
  13. CykoAGR

    CykoAGR Well-Known Member

    Dec 16, 2008
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    I completely agree on road vs mtn bike and even hybrid vs road is a big difference.

    I guess what I was getting at is that you can have the best bike on the road and if you have only ridden 50-60 miles total leading up to the week it doesnt matter. Also if you have a crappy bike that doesnt fit you will be miserable especially if it is hilly (western or eastern IA).

    I know one thing, I ride a fairly decent amount equating to 50-80 miles a week in June-July and I was DEAD at the end of day 2 last year. There are no hills around Des Moines to train on and the hilly day coupled with the heat made this fat guy tired.
     
  14. CYCLNST8

    CYCLNST8 Well-Known Member

    Jul 19, 2008
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    Go to a bike store. They should measure you for free. I did my first RAGBRAI on a 1980 all steel Schwinn. Last year I bought an aluminum Cannondale road bike with a carbon fork. I still have the Schwinn, but compared to the Cannondale it feels like riding a tank. An all carbon frame is extremely light weight and great for tackling hills and wind. Ya gotta be careful with all carbon though, because if you wipe out, you can seriously mangle the frame.
     
  15. Cycl1

    Cycl1 Well-Known Member

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    I reccomend going to a bike shop and trying a couple of different sizes out. The ones i have been to will reccomend certain sizes and will let you take the bike for a spin.
     
  16. ketelmeister

    ketelmeister Well-Known Member

    Oct 24, 2006
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    It depends how much you are riding now, and if you are riding. I do 10-12 miles a night and more on weekends. I had a racing bike, but for the 70 mile days, I went to a hybrid. It's easier on my back. But it's ALL personal preference. A good bike shop will let you use a bike to try it out with no obligation. If you buy a trek for $300 either new or used, you don't have a lot of downside when you sell it or want to upgrade. You should come out either way
     
  17. MrPeske

    MrPeske Member

    Apr 11, 2006
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    the fit would do with the frame size, should be a slight distance b/n your sack and the cross tube. Also the distance b/n the seat and handlebars as well as where your seat is & the pedals.

    My 2 cents... everyone wants a road bike b/c they are fast, similar to wanting a corvette. However how good is a corvette on a gravel road or on a snowy path. Buy a bike that gives you utility. I like one that has a rear rack that carries a cooler (full of beer).

    My old mountain bike has tires that took 110 psi, which is similar in pressure to a road bike. The higher the pressure the easier they roll (on smooth surfaces), but also make the bumpier roads/trails bumpy. A thicker or lower pressure tire give you a softer ride but you wont coast as well.

    the main thing you need, saddle time so you a55 isnt too sore and miles. The more you train, the more fun you will have. Depending on where you live, the more you train the more people you will meet and then you will find our RAGBRAI team...

    2 principals of RAGBRAI
    1. Build a base - eat a good bfast to need fuel for your engine
    2. Move to maintain. Stop & have fun but dont stop for too long otherwise you might not be able get on your bike or could have troubles steering...

    The good thing about a $300 bike, its not that expensive and you will learn but riding different bikes. So you could go to a bike shop, figure out your size and test ride 3-4 different bikes...

    Good luck, rubber side down!
     
  18. ChiefCyclone

    ChiefCyclone New Member

    Sep 6, 2011
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    Great Bike! I just bought this same one last week! Love it
     
  19. Farnsworth

    Farnsworth Well-Known Member

    Apr 11, 2006
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    Loving this thread. Keep the information coming.

    Right now I bike primarily for exercise on a mountain bike around the city (Omaha) trails. I have been thinking about upgrading to a hybrid or road bike for some time, but trying to keep the cost down. You guys are giving me some great ideas/insight.
     

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