Jake Sullivan

Discussion in 'CF Archive Bin' started by cmoore_23, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. cmoore_23

    cmoore_23 Well-Known Member

    Mar 23, 2006
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    good article about Jake

    http://sports.yahoo.com/ncaab/news;_ylt=AgwkvnrrPH1zu_1WfNzPfD05nYcB?slug=uwire-formercyclonejonestellstal&prov=uwire&type=lgns


    Former Cyclone Jones tells tale of life after basketball
    td.yspwidearticlebody { font-size: 13.5px; }By T.J. Rushing, Iowa State Daily
    April 4, 2007
    (CSTV U-WIRE) AMES, Iowa -- As a four-year starter at Iowa State from 2000 to 2004, he became one of the most popular players to don a Cyclones jersey in recent history. Now, still in Ames, Iowa, Jake Sullivan has already conquered the "real world," and is passionately enjoying life's simple pleasures.
    Sullivan graduated from Iowa State with a degree in psychology in 2004. That same year, in May, he was married to his college girlfriend Janel. Janel initially thought Jake was a "bad boy" when she met him their freshman year in Larch Hall. She said she based it off his image, and that's what she was first drawn to in him. But she eventually found out the truth.

    "Jake is very giving, he tells me loves me at least 10 times a day," Janel said. "He's fairly open, which is always good in a relationship, and he's always been very loving and affectionate. He's just like a big teddy bear."
    Along with his wife and former Cyclone football player Todd Miller, Jake currently runs a youth Amateur Athletic Union basketball program out of Ames called the All Iowa Attack.
    "After college we didn't know what we were going to do. I'm most proud that he's doing what he loves with basketball," Janel said. "It's great to have a husband that loves what they do. He's energetic and passionate, and we always have stuff to talk about in the evening when he gets home from work."
    The Attack was originally the idea of a man who Jake proclaimed as his greatest influence since graduating from Iowa State -- Dickson Jensen.
    "Dickson has had a big influence on my life," Jake said. "He's helped me a ton, especially with my walk with Christ, and on the business side of life."
    Jake met Jensen through church, and that's when Jensen asked him to coach.
    "Dickson asked me to help him out by coaching his son's and daughter's team," Jake said. "One thing led to another and I'm working full time with the Attack and am very happy with what I'm doing."
    Jake's passion isn't newfound; he's always been that way, especially in his college days. As a four-year starter for the Cyclones, Jake received many accolades.
    He was a three-time First Team Academic All-Conference selection, Big 12 Freshman of the Year in 2000, Third-Team All Big 12 in 2002, and holds a handful of shooting records in the ISU record books.
    "Jake was a very tough and gritty player. He always wanted to take the last shot, and he played the game the right way," Miller said. "He was a gym-rat; you could go to the Rec at 3, come back at 6, and he'd still be there."
    Being a competitor, Jake considered prolonging his playing career after Iowa State, but injuries took him down a different path.
    "I definitely considered playing more," Jake said. "I had three ankle surgeries at ISU though, one of them right after my senior year. Then the All Iowa Attack came along and I decided to take my life in a different direction. It's a great opportunity for me to remain competitive, although it's not the same as actually playing."
    Jake has completely given up his playing days of high school, where he played in Oakdale, Minn., and college, and has aimed his skills to helping the next generation learn the game he once excelled at.
    The All Iowa Attack has been a perfect situation for Jake to spread his knowledge, and to be a role model for everyone he comes into contact with.
    "Being a college player, you get used to competing," Jake said. "I've learned to channel my competitiveness in other aspects of my life."
    Miller elaborated on Jake's competitiveness.
    "I would say he's changed to the point where he no longer wants to showcase his skills, but instead he wants to give knowledge to kids around the state and the country," Miller said. "He instills being a good role model on and off the court."
    Jensen, a self-proclaimed "huge sports fan," knew Jake would be a right fit to head up his Attack program.
    "Jake's hard working, honest, has integrity and is very determined to accomplish tasks," Jensen said.
    "He was perfect. With his knowledge of the game and the way he handles kids and situations, that's a lot of social stuff that he's good at. Also, everybody knows him, and why wouldn't you want to play for him."
    Amanda Zimmerman is a future Cyclone player and one of Jake's players on the 16-and-under girls' Attack team.
    "He has really good experience, and he knows our point of view from when he was younger," Zimmerman said. "He knows how to communicate with us; he's a great friend of the family and a great person."
    Not only does Jake have his players on the court to deal with, but at home he has a pretty life-sized responsibility as well.
    Jake and his wife have a 7-month-old son named J.J. The name was given to him in attribution to his parent's names, Jake and Janel.
    Jake has put his psychology education to the test and decided to use the authoritative parenting style with his son, at least according to Janel.
    "He definitely has his ideas of how he wants J.J. to be raised. He likes to work with J.J. on his motor skills, and he wants it to be easy for J.J. to communicate with him when he's older," Janel said. Jake's successes in life can undoubtedly be traced back to his brain and his genuine kindness and caring toward all people he comes into contact with. "He's gonna be very successful in life," Jensen said. "You can tell after young people graduate from college how successful they will become. He will be successful no matter what he pursues."
     
  2. redrocker

    redrocker Well-Known Member

    Sep 5, 2006
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    What's the "Authoritative Parenting Style"?

    Does that have anything to do with a wooden spoon upside the head, I got that alot as a kid.
     
  3. sdsmith4

    sdsmith4 Member

    Mar 25, 2006
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    I think that was from the Iowa State Daily
     
  4. isucyfan

    isucyfan Speechless

    Apr 21, 2006
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    Authoritative is the "firm, fair, loving" parenting style. What you describe would be the authoritarian style.
     
  5. C.John

    C.John Optimistically Optimistic
    Staff Member

    Mar 23, 2006
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    You also got the wooden spoon? Imagine a 5'2" women yelling at her 6'+ sons "Don't make me get the wooden spoon"..Ah good times....
     
  6. jtd9046

    jtd9046 Well-Known Member

    Dec 20, 2006
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    Jake was offered a spot to provide the "color" on the Cyclone TV broadcasts a few years ago and turned it down. This was soon after Pete Taylor passed.
     
  7. redrocker

    redrocker Well-Known Member

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    Yep that was how I was raised. They loved me alot, but did not put up with crap or turn me into a brat. That is what I am doing with my son now, except without the wooden spoon (for now:sad9cd: )
     
  8. ripvdub

    ripvdub Well-Known Member

    Mar 20, 2006
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    I think he was offered it, or so we heard, when Gary Thompson retired from the tv spot.
     
  9. SeattleClone

    SeattleClone Well-Known Member

    Aug 15, 2006
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    Yes, I saw it in the Daily online today.

    Also, didn't Jake fill in as color commentator for a couple broadcasts? I didn't catch it, but I believe I heard he did pretty good.
     
  10. tigershoops31

    tigershoops31 Well-Known Member

    Apr 13, 2006
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    You guys are preaching to the choir! I don't know about you, but once we got older there would be an occasional "spoon shattering" across our rear. These were our true tests of character, for if you could not restrain your laughter, there would undoubtedly be a drawn out trip to the store in search of a new and improved wooden spoon. However, if you showed remorse (or better yet could squeeze out a tear), you would be shown mercy until your next embarrassing exploit.

    PS- If you really wanted to set off Mom, you could go to your room, put on like 7 pairs of pants to cushion the blows, go do something you knew you were going to get it for, and then enjoy a good chuckle until she realized you were packing.

    PSS- At this point it was considered fair play to run for the hills until Mom cooled off about your little prank :rofl8yi:
     
  11. Cyclone62

    Cyclone62 Well-Known Member

    Feb 1, 2007
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    Am I the only one who thinks that it's sad that the "spoon" or "belt" or "ruler" treatment make it a child abuse case now? I had the belt treatment as a kid, and I think that it helped me realize who I am today.

    At the same time, I realize that it's a fine line to walk with the belt issuew. IMO, kids need to get spanked some of time, but because of the abuse laws, they can't do that as discipline anymore.
     
  12. Cyclonepride

    Cyclonepride Thought Police
    Staff Member

    Yeah, it is pretty apparant when you go to almost any public place. The kids are hanging from the rafters, and the moms are saying "hey, don't do that." Unfortunately, these children grow up not knowing limits, not respecting authority, and having no sense of individual responsibility. Or in other words, they grow up to be Democrats.
     
  13. redrocker

    redrocker Well-Known Member

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    There is a big difference between abuse and discipline. I have a set of nephews that are disciplined and they listen and behave. Then I have another set of nephews that are not disciplined and are completely out of control. Kids do not get enough discipline these days. I have a friend that is a teacher and some of the stories I get from him just back my point up,
     
  14. cybsball20

    cybsball20 Well-Known Member

    Nov 26, 2006
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    I remember getting the paddle in elementary school and I'm not even that old... Of course it was a Catholic school in the south, but still... That was an embarassing walk back to class...
     
  15. isucyfan

    isucyfan Speechless

    Apr 21, 2006
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    I have to respectfully disagree with this one. I am a firm believer that parenting can be done without any form of spanking. Parents are too quick to use their hands instead of their heads, when their heads are just as effective in discipline. I have two young boys that have never been spanked, and although they are not perfect, they are respectful and disciplined. I have been a in-home caseworker for struggling parents, and have seen the results of lazy parenting and abusive parenting.

    Parenting without spanking can be done effectively. In case you may think I am a touchy feely hippy or something...I grew up being spanked and am no worse for it, but in my education (ISU-Growth and Dev. of Children '95) and experiences, came to realize that it can be done another way. If that other way doesn't involve hitting, why not do it?
     
  16. Jerry1982

    Jerry1982 Member

    Sep 3, 2006
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    My Dad was a hobbyist woodworker. One day I really messed up. I did something stupid that took time and money to fix up. Dad caught me in the middle of this mis-adventure. He told me to stay where I was and not move. He then walked to his woodshop and made a paddle. I could hear the table saw, planer and jointer being used. (took two minutes) Then he walked back to me with this new paddle. I got one swat and NEVER misbehaved in that nature again. He never had to use that paddle again either.
     
  17. mkcrawford

    mkcrawford Member

    Mar 20, 2006
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    :eek4wd: That was about the time you were wishing your dad's hobby was bubblewrap. :laugh8kb:
     
  18. redrocker

    redrocker Well-Known Member

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    I remember getting a woodend paddle (complete with holes for less wind resistance) when I was in elementary (early 80's). My parents gave me a few good swats and one wooden spoon, but you know what, I deserved each one of those that I got! I probably deserved alot worse, I was rotten, and grew up to regret it. I did finally grow up to be very respectful of my parents, not out of fear, but because I knew it hurt them more to do it, than my red bottom. Now that I have a 3 year old (terrible 2's are nothing, wait til 3) son, who loves to push every button his mother and I have, I do not like yelling at or putting him in time out, cause it does hurt to see him cry. We have not resorted to the "spankings" yet, and I hope we do not have to.
     
  19. isucyfan

    isucyfan Speechless

    Apr 21, 2006
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    No one, especially a child, deserves to be hit. (Except maybe Rosie O'Donnell) We are so used to spankings for "discipline" that people believe it is deserved. What is deserved is respect in discipline, and hitting is not respectful. Also, what message is it sending when we tell kids not to hit, then do just that when they misbehave?
     
  20. redrocker

    redrocker Well-Known Member

    Sep 5, 2006
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    Maybe you should have seen my in my younger days. Here is a good one for you. When I was about 4, and really terrorizing my parents, they were at their wits end trying to figure out what to do to me. So they told me about "THE BAD BOYS FARM". They actually made me pack a bag, drove me out into the country to the scariest old abandoned farm house they could find. Parked at the end of the lane and made me stand outside the car with my suitcase and told me to go up to the house and just them them I was a bad boy, and they would know what to do with me. Well I bawled and bawled. They let me back in the car, and I was a good kid for about 2 - 3 weeks. They threated with the Bad Boys farm every now and then. Now it is the big running joke in the family, and I myself am looking for an old abandoned farm house, incase I need it someday.:yes4lo:
     

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