Jaegerschnitzel

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Phaedrus, Mar 7, 2008.

  1. Phaedrus

    Phaedrus Well-Known Member

    Jan 13, 2008
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    There was a post earlier this week, that made an allusion to how poor German food and cookery is. I was inspired by that post, to make one of my favorite German meals last night, and my belief in the sheer awesomeness of German food done correctly was revalidated by the results. Here is the recipe, if anyone is interested in replicating it.

    4 x porkloin slices
    1 x cup flour
    1 x cup cornmeal
    2 x eggs
    Salt and pepper to taste.
    Enough oil to float the pork loins.

    1 x pound fresh mushrooms
    2 x dried mushroom soup packets, reconstituted with water or enough canned mushroom soup to approximate the amount of sauce you'd like.
    3 x tbsp butter

    Your favorite starch, such as french fries, roasted potatoes or spaetzle, if you can get it.

    Slice the mushrooms, put aside. Start warming the mushroom soup mix on low. Pound the porkloin slices until they are 1/4" thick. Saute the mushrooms in butter. While the mushrooms are sauteeing, preheat the oil, and dip the pounded porkloins in flour, then egg, then cornmeal and put in the oil, once it is hot. (I like to run my stovetop on 7 out of 10 settings)

    It should take 3-5 minutes per side to do the schnitzel, once they are done, put them on a paper towel on a plate and reserve them to the oven set at 200 F to keep them warm and to drive away some of the oil.

    Sometime during this time, the mushrooms should be sauteed and should be introduced into the soup mix, which you need to stir occasionally.

    You want to time your starch to coincide with your frying process, serve the mushroom sauce over both the starch and the schnitzel, and put a side of steamed cabbage with, if you'd like.

    Once you get the breading/frying down, this is a delightful meal, especially when served with a good Bock beer. Simple, but nice.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. whirlybirds

    whirlybirds Well-Known Member

    Oct 25, 2007
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    screw the german food, ill take a german beer....... nothing beats a warsteiner
     
  3. Phaedrus

    Phaedrus Well-Known Member

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    You "do" know, that Warsteiner is the "Old Milwaukee Ice" of German beers, in Germany, don't you?:yes:

    The best German beer is brewed on the spot, aged properly, and served to you without having been exposed to sunlight, or someone beating the daylights out of it going from manufacturer, to warehouse, and trucked to a store where min. wage types drop it a couple of times.
     
  4. Dave19642006

    Dave19642006 Well-Known Member

    Nov 21, 2006
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    #4 Dave19642006, Mar 7, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2008
    And ruin it with a fries picture... lets americanize it -its served with spatzle (home-made thats including the Spaztle drucker or REAL german potato salad-like my mom (100% German) used to make.
     
  5. peteypie

    peteypie Well-Known Member

    Jun 20, 2007
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    I have a question. I work where we make Kosher meat, and I was wondering what the word schnitzel actually means. It seems like if we don't have a name for something, we just call it schnitzel. The closest I could guess is that it came from the thigh of different animals. If that is true though, then your recipe would not make sence. Just wondering?
     
  6. Phaedrus

    Phaedrus Well-Known Member

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    Oddly enough, most German restaurants I go to serve it with fries, now. I loooove spaetzle, though, to sop up the mushroom gravy. And don't get me wrong, German fries are something special.

    As a very close second, I like the gebraten kartoffeln (pan fried potates) with bacon and cumin with my schnitzel.
     
  7. Phaedrus

    Phaedrus Well-Known Member

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    Schnitzel = Cutlet, in English. both are diminutives of the word "to cut".

    In German, the word "Schnitten" means to cut, so "Schnitzel" means "small cut". So, it's a small cut of meat.
     
  8. peteypie

    peteypie Well-Known Member

    Jun 20, 2007
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    Thank you wise one, now I know, and I can pretend that I'm the smart one. Sometimes we use it when we make cutlets, but sometimes it is just a small piece of meat, so again I think we when we don't have another name for it..........:yes:.............Schnitzel! But thank you
     
  9. jdoggivjc

    jdoggivjc Well-Known Member

    Sep 27, 2006
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    Except for a Lowenbraü...
     
  10. hoosman

    hoosman Member

    Sep 4, 2006
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    If anyone is heading through the Quad Cities, you should try the Lodge, a German castle/restaurant, they serve Spaetzle, Jaegerschnitzel, Wienerschnitzel, und so weiter...

    I also think the Bierstube is pretty cool - you can try all kinds of German beer there.

    I suppose DM has similar establishments.
     
  11. CyinCo

    CyinCo Well-Known Member

    Mar 24, 2006
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    I love German food and beer.
     
  12. wartknight

    wartknight Well-Known Member

    Mar 24, 2006
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    Boiled potatoes and red cabbage with beef=excellent.
    When I was in Germany every host family I stayed with had Warsteiner.
    Nothing like sitting on the streets of Eisenach sorrounded by "mountains" and eating a Thuringer sausage with a bun that covers a quarter of it with a thin strip of mustard and sipping back on a Schwarzen Drakken.
     
  13. CyinCo

    CyinCo Well-Known Member

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    This makes we want to head to the Hessen House for Dinner tonight. I wish that smoking ban would hurry up. It is tough to move from a smoke free state to a smoking state.
     
  14. wartknight

    wartknight Well-Known Member

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    On a seperate trip to Deutschland, I spent some time in Hamburg and the group I was with ran a football camp for jr high kids. I loved it when they were done, the parents busted out the coolers (we were expecting Gatorade or Capri-sun like the soccer moms have here after games). Instead the coolers were full of beer. Great.
    One night our hosts took us down to walk us through the red light district. If you haven't been there, that is something to experience. Little store fronts with hookers sitting in every window and the windows open up for "negotiations." Our host was mocking a rather large lady in a storefront in English saying "Hey, look at the farmer's daughter! You have lots of those in Iowa, hey?"
     
  15. jdoggivjc

    jdoggivjc Well-Known Member

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    Never done The Lodge, but I have done the Bier Stube. That place is friggin' awesome! One nite a buddy of mine was having a really bad day. They brought him a liter of Lowenbraü - A big childish grin erupted on his face. IIRC he ziggy-zoggied half of it...
     
  16. clintr

    clintr Active Member

    Nov 12, 2007
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    Great Post! This is my favorite German meal. I'll have to compare against some of my recipes for "hunter's meat". Good job!:smile:
     
  17. 1100011CS

    1100011CS Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
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    That sounds awesome!
     
  18. Broodwich

    Broodwich Well-Known Member

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    #18 Broodwich, Mar 7, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2008
  19. Phaedrus

    Phaedrus Well-Known Member

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    Eisenacher Thuringer is The Best. I like the old nasty aged stuff, myself, while my wife and kids are partial to the fresher Thuringer.

    The Eastern part of Germany is still pretty beer deficient, in my opinion. That would explain why they drink Warsteiner.

    An earlier poster mentioned Lowenbraeu. The original "Lowenbraeu" from the Muenchner Hofbrauhaus is still pretty awesome, though it's sister, Spaeten from Passau is pret' darned good, too.
     
  20. Phaedrus

    Phaedrus Well-Known Member

    Jan 13, 2008
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    At a school event earlier this year, they had an auction for a fundraiser. Of course, the door prizes were "beer baskets."

    NOTHING beats beer at all school events. Absolutely nothing. Beer at football games, beer at swim meets, beer at school plays.

    And a glass of wine for the awards night the other week. Awesome!
     

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