Emerald Ash Borer Almost in Iowa

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by AIT, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. AIT

    AIT Well-Known Member

    May 29, 2008
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  2. Al_4_State

    Al_4_State Well-Known Member

    Mar 27, 2006
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    Luckily, once you get 30-40 miles west of the Wisconsin border, there are no trees to eat.... (except for Southern Iowa)
     
  3. isunorth

    isunorth Well-Known Member

    Mar 3, 2009
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    Are you being sarcastic or have you never been to Minnesota before?
     
  4. It's all about where our imported firewood comes from. My yard at home has 4 ash trees but luckily we are in a small town that may be spared, who knows. There are still elm trees that survived that scare.
     
  5. bos

    bos Legend
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    Apr 10, 2006
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    Is he a new recruit?:wink:
     
  6. joefrog

    joefrog Well-Known Member

    Apr 29, 2008
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    While it is easy to make jokes, and I likes me some jokes, things like this can become very serious in a short amount of time. It is worth keeping an eye on.

    It is like the rust problem with the world's wheat. That could really cause problems for everybody.
     
  7. Al_4_State

    Al_4_State Well-Known Member

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    I went to high school in Rochester. I lived my entire life (prior to ISU) w/in 2 miles of the Iowa/Minnesota border. I was referring to the Iowa/Wisconsin border. Once you get about 40 miles west of the Mississippi in Iowa (or Southern Minnesota), with the exception of along streams, there are almost no trees. It's farmland, and before that it was a prairie...

    North of the Cities, it's all forest.
     
  8. CyCrazy

    CyCrazy Well-Known Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    being closely tied to the hort dept at isu, along with entemlogy etc etc, the entemolgy professors who i know say give it two years max and it will be in Iowa and will be devastating
     
  9. MNclone

    MNclone Well-Known Member

    Apr 10, 2006
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    This is very unfortunate news
     
  10. psycln11

    psycln11 Active Member

    Apr 20, 2006
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    I'm more concerned with the world-wide decline in honey bees. We need them to pollenate (sp?) several varieties flowers and plants that we eat on a daily basis.

    And I WILL be pissed when/if I have to cut down the ash tree I planted 9 years ago when I bought my house.
     
  11. CyCrazy

    CyCrazy Well-Known Member

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    it will take at least a few years longer to get to central iowa after it gets here.. but I know that doesnt really help
     
  12. Al_4_State

    Al_4_State Well-Known Member

    Mar 27, 2006
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    So would it be smart to start harvesting ash trees right now? I know there has been a similar problem in Colorado w/pine beetles, and I got the impression that a lot of people feel they should've taken measures before the bugs actually got there...
     
  13. CyCrazy

    CyCrazy Well-Known Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    that is an option that has been floated out there, but i dont know if it is neccesary because our landscape is not dominated by ash in the terms that the mountains are covered with pines. Ash is a popular tree but not the most dominate species in Iowa
     
  14. Torks Pub

    Torks Pub Active Member

    Dec 16, 2006
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    Last year I read that Bayer had developed a treatment for EAB. Hope it works as half of Ankeny has streets lined with these trees. Eerily similar to Dutch Elm disease that ravaged cities in the 60's and 70's. Maybe developers will finally learn to not over utilize one species of trees.

    Pest Alerts - Emerald Ash Borer - Bayer Advanced â„¢
     
  15. CyCrazy

    CyCrazy Well-Known Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    The bayer stuff is just so -so at best.
    and putting in different species would only make to much sense:yes:
     
  16. Torks Pub

    Torks Pub Active Member

    Dec 16, 2006
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  17. TykeClone

    TykeClone Burgermeister!

    Oct 18, 2006
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    I think that ash trees replaced elms in many towns (in Iowa?) after dutch elm disease.

    I've got two pretty nice ones on our lot and would be displeased if I had to cut them down. :no:
     
  18. cyfan964

    cyfan964 Well-Known Member

    Oct 22, 2006
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    Most smart nurseries in the area stopped even selling Ash trees about 2 years ago. The bug will get here and there is nothing that can be done. Just like we can't grow white birches very successfully it is nearly impossible to stop boring insects on woody plants.
     
  19. CyCrazy

    CyCrazy Well-Known Member

    Dec 17, 2008
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    yep ur right I hope some scientists can come up with a variety that is super immune.. hey we already came up with a bentgrass variety that can handle roundup:smile:
     
  20. jumbopackage

    jumbopackage Well-Known Member

    Sep 18, 2007
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    I was in Northern Michigan a bit last year, and it's pretty sad what has happened there.

    It's still beautiful, just a bit...sparser. Sort of like a supermodel getting old.

    They were trying to keep it out of the UP, but I don't know what sort of luck they had.
     

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