CFN Ranks best QB's in 2009

Discussion in 'General College Sports' started by hawkfan, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. hawkfan

    hawkfan Well-Known Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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    Here's the list:

    Scout.com: 2010 NFL Draft - Top 25 Quarterback Prospects

    [FONT=verdana, arial, sans serif]2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings[FONT=verdana, arial, sans serif]

    The Quarterbacks
    [/FONT]
    [/FONT]
    [SIZE=-1]

    Going into the 2009 college football season season, here are the top prospects to watch out for. For now, only FBS/D-I players who'll be eligible for the 2009 NFL Draft are listed. The player analysis will come this summer.[/SIZE]

    FRANCHISE STARS

    1. Sam Bradford, Oklahoma (Jr.)
    2. Colt McCoy, Texas

    POSSIBLE NFL STARTERS

    3. Tim Tebow, Florida
    4. Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame (Jr.)
    5. Dan LeFevour, Central Michigan
    6. Jevan Snead, Ole Miss (Jr.)
    7. Zac Robinson, Oklahoma State
    8. Tim Hiller, Western Michigan

    TOP PROSPECTS ON THE RADAR

    9. Colin Kaepernick, Nevada (Jr.)
    10. Case Keenum, Houston (Jr.)
    11. Jarrett Brown, West Virginia
    12. Rusty Smith, Florida Atlantic
    13. Juice Williams, Illinois
    14. Max Hall, BYU
    15. Tony Pike, Cincinnati
    16. Joe Webb, UAB
    17. Mitch Mustain, USC (Jr.)
    18. Adam Weber, Minnesota (Jr.)
    19. Todd Reesing, Kansas
    20. Tyler Sheehan, Bowling Green
    21. Daryll Clark, Penn State
    22. Andy Schmitt, Eastern Michigan
    23. Greg Alexander, Hawaii
    24. Ricky Stanzi, Iowa (Jr.)
    25. Jake Locker, Washington (Jr.)


    Thought this was interesting, particularly because ISU fans seem very confident that AA is better than Ricky Stanzi. Personally I think they are relatively equal because they are in different systems. Stanzi is a better pro style QB than Arnaud and Arnaud is a better spread QB than Stanzi. Just thought I'd bring in the commentary of a totally objective source.

    This list does destroy its credibility though by ranking Jimmy Clausen at 4 and Tim Tebow at 3. IMO Clausen is way overrated and Tebow will struggle greatly to get his footwork and fundamentals in order going from a college spread offense to an NFL pro offense (something all spread QB's are at a huge disadvantage becasue of).
     
  2. brianhos

    brianhos Moderator
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    Iowa is a better team than ISU, so Stanzi looks like a better QB.
     
  3. CyDude16

    CyDude16 Well-Known Member

    Oct 2, 2008
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    Stanzi should be top 5 obviously.:jimlad::skeptical:
     
  4. hawkfan

    hawkfan Well-Known Member

    Feb 18, 2009
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    Yeah, I agree that after looking at that list the QB's on better teams did seem to be given an edge. However, I think the primary reason Stanzi made that list is because there just aren't that many pure pro style QB's in college anymore and spread QB's rarely succeed in the NFL.
     
  5. d4nim4l

    d4nim4l Well-Known Member

    Apr 23, 2008
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    You want to know how that list loses credibility? Two words.

    Todd Reesing.

    Great college QB, but don't know if he has the arm strength to make up for his lack of height when the NFL comes around.
     
  6. cybsball20

    cybsball20 Well-Known Member

    Nov 26, 2006
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    Arnaud is a far better pro prospect than Stanzi. He's stronger, has a stronger arm, better vision and a far quicker release. My guess, they just haven't seen much of Arnaud to have him on the radar.
     
  7. hawkfan

    hawkfan Well-Known Member

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    Again, this list is looking at successful college QB's, but it is looking at it from the context of the 2010 draft. Agree that Reesing is a fantastic college QB, but he runs in a spread offense and many doubt he can make the NFL throws.
     
  8. d4nim4l

    d4nim4l Well-Known Member

    Apr 23, 2008
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    I think that would be the wrong argument to make. Here's why:

    McCoy
    LeFevour
    Robinson
    Hiller
    Kaepernick
    Williams
    Reesing
    Clark
    Alexander

    All spread quarterbacks. All ranked higher than Stanzi. Arnaud is not on here because he plays for a 2-10 team.

    That isn't taking anything away from Stanzi, but rather saying that a lot of these guys are on here because they are the most visible players on good teams. With the exception of a few of course.

    For some reason people get a boner over Locker still.
     
  9. hawkfan

    hawkfan Well-Known Member

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    I agree that Arnaud, statistically, will be the better college QB. However, I doubt seriously that he will thrive in the NFL. The reason Stanzi made the list is because he will have 4 seasons of developing his footwork and making throws that he would need to make in the NFL, an advantage that Arnaud will not have. Because of the two different offenses they are in, Arnaud's NFL potential is handicapped.

    Edit: I doubt seriously that Stanzi will thrive in the NFL either, but he at least has experience with the footwork and throws he'd have to make when he got there.
     
  10. GrimesCy

    GrimesCy Member

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    Arnaud is certainly proven to learn three different styles of offense vs Stanzi hand it off to the rb and 3 yards and a cloud of dust and an occasional roll out to the strong side and dump it off to the tight end...Advantage Arnaud...That is a bonus of 3 Cotstache rides
     
  11. IcSyU

    IcSyU Well-Known Member

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    I REALLY hope you're kidding, or that's freaking hilarious! :biglaugh:

    Arnaud's footwork blows Stanzi's out of the water, Arnaud throws a better ball than Stanzi, and Arnaud is a bigger playmaker with the ball in his hands than Stanzi. Stanzi was good at his job last season: hand it off.
     
  12. Cy Hard

    Cy Hard Well-Known Member

    Jan 5, 2008
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    No, he's right, AA will have had 5 years to learn how to develop his game for the NFL. Everyone laugh now, but AA will be a 1st rounder in 2 years. You heard it here first.
     
  13. d4nim4l

    d4nim4l Well-Known Member

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    That is why Arnaud has a better chance to thrive than Stanzi. Footwork can be taught. Timing can be taught. Reading can be taught.

    You can't teach arm strength and Arnaud has thrown the deep outs, hooks and bombs that are necessary in the NFL. I have seen Stanzi make very few of these throws. Largely because he did not have to. Maybe things will change, but I doubt it.
     
  14. cybsball20

    cybsball20 Well-Known Member

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    At the rate former Pats coaches are taking over, I'm guessing at least half the NFL will be running some variation of the spread offense by the time either one gets there, so Arnaud may have the advantage... Next year you could have as many as 8 NFL teams running the spread.
     
  15. hawkfan

    hawkfan Well-Known Member

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    You do realize that the #1 reason pro scouts HATE the spread offense is because it handicaps a QB's ability to develop their footwork and it limits the numbers of NFL throws they make. If you knew that my post would probably not seem "freaking hilarious". Spread QB's simply have a lot higher failure rate in the NFL than QB's who run in a pro style set because they have less experience with NFL style offenses and the learning curve is that much higher.
     
  16. GrimesCy

    GrimesCy Member

    Oct 25, 2008
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    Remember Iowa is the equivelent to the NFL team in this state so he is in the NFL. No wander Little Ricky is rated so high:jimlad:
     
  17. hawkfan

    hawkfan Well-Known Member

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    That is about as realistic as me claiming Iowa will win a national championship in 2009.
     
  18. IcSyU

    IcSyU Well-Known Member

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    #18 IcSyU, Apr 10, 2009
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2009
    Arnaud is running in a spread, but his raw skills are better than Stanzi's. Better ball: Arnaud. Better feet: Arnaud. Better vision: Arnaud. Period. I know fully well how many offenses in the NFL work. However, more teams each year are starting to go towards the spread (dunno why but they are). Arnaud has proven he can drop back and sling it around, and he can throw decent on the run. This without a running game. Stanzi made throws into 1 on 1 coverage because teams tried putting 8 in the box against Greene. If I'm not mistaken, Stanzi also lived with tight ends. Normally a high percentage pass. Arnaud also has an advantage when it comes to consistency, and that's where you can make or break in the NFL.
     
  19. GrimesCy

    GrimesCy Member

    Oct 25, 2008
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    According to your other counterparts you should have been in the game this last year:jimlad:
     
  20. hawkfan

    hawkfan Well-Known Member

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    There will never be an NFL that features a large majority of teams running exclusively spread offenses. The reason the spread is popular in college is because it provides mismatches for teams with lesser talent. If you can spread out a defense, find a mismatch somewhere, and throw the ball to that mismatch, less talented teams can take advantage of a speed/talent advantage somewhere. The spread is not practical in the NFL - there is too much speed and talent everywhere for it to provide the mismatches necessary to run it. A team would have to have a stable to 5 of the fastest WR's in the NFL in order to run a spread offense that would provide them the mismatches that make the spread work in college. For that reason, you'll never see the spread as a main feature of a large majority of NFL offenses. Also, If you can't run in the NFL you are screwed come playoff time, and you can't run out of a spread nearly as effectively in the NFL as you can in college.
     

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