Ash Tree Replacements

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Bobber, Feb 14, 2014.

  1. Bobber

    Bobber Well-Known Member

    Apr 12, 2006
    8,377
    153
    63
    Management/Sales
    Hudson, Iowa
    Any suggestions from tree experts out there? I have one in my front yard and they just found the borer up in Waterloo, so it's just a matter of time. I've got two nice oaks already so need to go with something different.

    Suppose I could go with a Maple or even a Linden. Wondering about some of the American Elm hybrids out there? I've seen some old Elm's and they really are wonderful trees. I've heard mixed opinions on the new ones. Some say they look too much like a Chinese Elm. Others say they still won't beat the Dutch Elm disease. Anybody have any experience with them?
     
  2. Wesley

    Wesley Well-Known Member

    Apr 12, 2006
    70,964
    542
    113
    Envr Engr/Program Manager
    Omaha
    Go Linden.
     
  3. azepp

    azepp Well-Known Member

    Dec 9, 2009
    3,964
    136
    63
    Ankeny
    I have a Linden and the Japanese beetles eat all the leaves off of it every year unless I spray it with insecticide. I'm not sure if they like all varieties of Linden, but I would not plant one unless you know for sure that it's a variety that doesn't attract them.
     
  4. isuno1fan

    isuno1fan Well-Known Member

    Mar 30, 2006
    18,748
    533
    113
    Clive, Iowa
    I would honestly do another oak. The Japanese beetles will stay away and they thrive in Iowa soil.
     
  5. MeanDean

    MeanDean Well-Known Member

    Jan 5, 2009
    4,651
    218
    63
    Male
    Retired Civil Engineer
    Clarence IA-Jensen Beach FL
    Dutch Elm
     
  6. Wesley

    Wesley Well-Known Member

    Apr 12, 2006
    70,964
    542
    113
    Envr Engr/Program Manager
    Omaha
    #6 Wesley, Feb 14, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
    Oak is like ISU football, it takes a long time to develop a good t(ree)am.

    If you want something big, I have started a sequia and Cali redwood trees in a pot the first year from the Cali nursery. The redwood grows much faster. I also had both types of trees when I lived in Virginia, but I moved before they were much more than five feet tall.
     
  7. Splendid

    Splendid Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    598
    11
    18
    Des Moines
    It would be a hoot to plant a great redwood! You would have a couple oak trees standing 30/40 feet tall and next to them if you live to be a 1000 you'd have a 35 story redwood.
     
  8. SpiderClone

    SpiderClone Member

    Jan 17, 2014
    247
    7
    18
  9. Die4Cy

    Die4Cy Well-Known Member

    Jan 2, 2010
    4,613
    144
    63
    Autumn blaze maple. Grows fairly quickly, nice shade, really pretty in the fall. I have one now, and when my ash goes, I will be sad but probably put another ABM in right away.
     
  10. ISU_phoria

    ISU_phoria Well-Known Member

    Apr 10, 2006
    2,085
    82
    48
    Construction Project Mana
    Andover, MN
    Reminds me of a great/stupid joke.

    Q: How do you catch a bear?
    A: Go into the woods and dig a deep hole. Then, fill the hole with ashes and line the outside edge with peas. So, when a bear comes to take a pea, you kick him in the ash-hole.
     
  11. Die4Cy

    Die4Cy Well-Known Member

    Jan 2, 2010
    4,613
    144
    63
    Hey. It's a polar bear and an ice hole. Tell it right!:jimlad:
     
  12. cyclonewoes

    cyclonewoes Member

    Dec 12, 2008
    110
    1
    18
    Ankeny
    I agree autumn blaze is a good choice
     
  13. CYKXBUT

    CYKXBUT Member

    Jul 21, 2006
    408
    24
    18
    What about an aspen? I bought one last year.
     
  14. bugs4cy

    bugs4cy Well-Known Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,011
    64
    48
    Story County
    My life seems to revolve around EAB these days, and with that said, I do not suggest planting a maple. Why - because most urban tree inventories from around Iowa are showing an even higher percentage of maple in our cities than ash. We need more diversity, not less. Take a look around - what does you neighboring properties and neighborhood have? Now, plant something different. We're in a real 'ash bind' right now because so many people just planted ash in the wake of Dutch elm disease. Don't repeat history by plowing in more of the same.

    This is a publication on alternatives to ash from ISU Extension.

    Also, so, it is important to look at your site and size your tree correctly and take environmental conditions into consideration (dry/wet/etc). It seems so elementary but time and time again I find myself, politely, having to explain to people that they made a poor choice.

    And as a craptacular Valentines day present to me, I found out today we need to announce more EAB positives next week.
    :sad:
     
  15. VTXCyRyD

    VTXCyRyD Well-Known Member

    Sep 2, 2010
    4,028
    201
    63
    Male
    Is there any good insecticide (ground treat) that is effective?
     
  16. Wesley

    Wesley Well-Known Member

    Apr 12, 2006
    70,964
    542
    113
    Envr Engr/Program Manager
    Omaha
    Please no pacific sunset maples. They are ugly and grow and shed like weeds. Neighbor has four of them and they are not worthy of his yard.

    Norway maple is much better than those hybrids. Gingko sounds okay if you get the male version?
     
  17. 00clone

    00clone Well-Known Member

    Apr 12, 2011
    19,642
    489
    83
    "Before" picture model
    Iowa City area

    So you're saying we got our Ashes in a bind right now?
     
  18. bugs4cy

    bugs4cy Well-Known Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,011
    64
    48
    Story County
    Maybe. But I am personally not a lover of treatments, especially soil drenches. Here is ISU's publication. Pay attention to max size and health of tree. - And per acre maximum treatment restrictions. Treatments are not a one-and-done solution to EAB. You're looking at treatments every years (or every two at the max) for the life of that tree is the treatments works.

    Previously we believed pollinators didn't work ash trees, so EAB treatments didn't affect them. But, some early research results from last summer show another side to that story.
     
  19. Fishhead

    Fishhead Active Member

    Oct 6, 2010
    692
    26
    28
    Hackberry is a gOod native midwestern tree. Good for wildlife too
     
  20. MNclone

    MNclone Well-Known Member

    Apr 10, 2006
    3,684
    101
    63
    Production Engineer
    Burnsville, MN
    I'm a big fan of Kentucky coffee and thornless locust trees.
     

Share This Page