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    Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Slingboxes are very big in Europe. They have 3 types of models. I bought mine (tuner) for $110 from buy.com two weeks ago. You hook your personal cable up to the internet and you sling the signal around the world through the internet. You can watch local games while traveling on yyour internet connection and laptop. I suspect cell phones can also receive the signal. Basically I can receive 67 cable channels on a computer anywhere in the world with a code anjd password. If you have a buddy with lots of great channels, you can probably enjoy the games with his password on your computer. You can hook up a monitor to your laptop also. Took 15 minutes to hook up. Now, I think this is a great product to let your out of state buddies watch the local bball games since anyone can load the software for free and have the proper passwords. Honk if you like this idea.

    Sling Media - Products



    Made for Slingbox
    SlingPlayer is the interface that appears on the screen of your computer or mobile device. This pioneering software allows you to watch and control your basic cable with wide-ranging functionality and ease.
    SlingStream is the innovative streaming technology that ensures you receive the clearest picture possible at any given location.
    The SlingLink™ acts as an extension cord for the Internet by using your home’s existing electrical wiring to transmit the ethernet signal from your router to wherever your Slingbox is installed.
    The HD Connect is a cable that enables you to watch your home television’s HD programming by connecting your HD component device to your Slingbox.


    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    All windows bases mobile phones can get connect to slingbox.

    When I upgrade to a Treo 700W (windows based) I will be getting this product.


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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    I have thought about these. They probably do not work with satellite though do they?


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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    You need the PRO model for satellite.
    The Slingbox PRO is the perfect companion for your home theater. The Slingbox PRO allows you to watch and control up to three standard definition and one high definition video devices anywhere you go. Using an Internet connected computer or mobile device, you can watch and control your home TV, DVR, basic cable, digital cable box, or satellite receiver around town or around the globe. With a Slingbox PRO you will never be separated from your favorite TV shows, sports broadcasts, breaking news stories, digital video recordings, or video on demand.





    ALL-ACCESS PASS (AT NO EXTRA CHARGE)


    The Slingbox PRO not only allows you to watch your home television virtually anywhere, but it also allows you to watch any cable subscriptions, special programming, or sports packages you may have - at no extra cost. If its on your home TV, its on your computer and phone with no monthly fees.


    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
    Let my Fred's Four Horsemen ride: Georges, Hogue, Nader, and McKay.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Quote Originally Posted by Wesley View Post
    Honk if you like this idea.
    HONK!

    I love my Slingbox. Anybody know when the Slingcatcher will be available?


    Yeah well, ya know, that's just, like uh, your opinion, man.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Quote Originally Posted by Wesley View Post
    to let your out of state buddies watch the local bball games
    Wesley, my good buddy..it's me, your out of state buddy! You know, C.John, we've known each other forever or 4 months or whatever. How have you been? Oh, ya..what's that password thing again?



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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Quote Originally Posted by brianhos View Post
    I have thought about these. They probably do not work with satellite though do they?
    AV or Pro can do satellite. Pro is required for HD. AV lists at $180 and Pro at $250, but shop the net and save a few bucks.


    Yeah well, ya know, that's just, like uh, your opinion, man.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Now that is cool. If MCHSI shows the Iowa State-UNI game, someone in New Mexico could get it through the internet at no cost from a buddy. In fact, you could be on a yacht in the Gulf watching the Cyclones via cellphone or staellite wireless. What is the slingcatcher?


    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
    Let my Fred's Four Horsemen ride: Georges, Hogue, Nader, and McKay.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Food for thought for out of staters???

    Buy a Slingbox for your buddy or relatives that live in the Des Moines area, then watch all the ISU sports from your computer where you live.

    Atleast I assume this would work.

    Any thoughts??


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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    That would work for sure. Cheaper than tickets. The Pro model apparently does satellite also. Even better you could watch the game on your cell phone or satellite wireless laptop if broadcast while attending in person. Souinds like a win win. If you go to London, you can keep up on sporting events. Verison wants to spend $3B and Sprint even more to broadcast TV through cellphones. Quewst has a wait and see attittude as usual. Why wait for that. Use a slingbox to watch sports on the go. Buy the pay for view Hoya fight and send it out to your neighbors. Start a slingbox club on this site and match up people.


    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
    Let my Fred's Four Horsemen ride: Georges, Hogue, Nader, and McKay.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Quote Originally Posted by brianhos View Post
    I have thought about these. They probably do not work with satellite though do they?

    Sorry to "cross-pollinate" between threads but Jim Rome "pimps" these on his radio show so you probably don't want to buy one anyway!


    Just kidding!!



    I cheer for two teams, Iowa State and whoever is playing the hawkeyes.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Old review on older model tells more about the device (new versions are much better):

    CNET editors' review

    Reviewed by: John P. Falcone
    Edited by: David Katzmaier
    Reviewed on 3/22/06 Updated on: 11/1/06 Release date: 7/1/05


    Editors' note: The Slingbox model reviewed here (model SB100-100, aka "Slingbox Classic") is no longer produced, though remaining inventory will continue to be sold. It's been replaced by a trio of second-generation models.

    Despite all the advances of the past couple of years, watching your favorite TV show can still be a challenge if you're constantly on the road. Digital video recorders and the iTunes video store--not to mention BitTorrent--have all helped transient couch potatoes keep up with the latest episodes, but it's the Slingbox that's really changed the game for media on the go. The $200 device--introduced in 2005 from start-up Sling Media--lets you access your cable or satellite box or any other video source from virtually any Windows PC with broadband Internet access, whether it's in your home or halfway around the world. But putting the boob tube on your PC wasn't good enough; Sling Media has added mobile software to its repertoire, letting users stream their home TV programming to any Web-enabled, Windows Mobile-powered handheld or cell phone.

    The process all begins at home, where you set up the Slingbox hardware. The device itself is a modest-size, tapered silver brick, measuring 1.75 inches high by 10.75 wide by 3.75 deep. It actually looks a bit goofy, due mainly to the pointillist marketing inscriptions on the top: My Cable, My DVD, My Music Anywhere, and so forth. Fortunately, once you connect the Slingbox to your home A/V system, you never have to see it again; the always-on device can be tucked away in the depths of your TV stand where it will toil away indefinitely. The physical setup is quick and logical. Simply hook up the video source, be it cable box, satellite box, DVR, and the like, to the Slingbox's composite, S-Video, or RF cable inputs; place the IR blaster; and connect the device to your home network's router with an Ethernet cable--you're good to go. You can connect as many as three devices to each 'box, but the dual-headed IR blaster will control only two external devices. You can, however, change channels on the built-in analog tuner if an unscrambled RF source such as an analog cable feed or an antenna is connected. The Slingbox also has pass-through S-Video and composite-A/V outputs, and it provides the necessary cable interconnects, so it integrates seamlessly into your system without the need for any major rewiring.

    Once you have the Slingbox base station wired up and ready to go, you'll need to install the viewing software on a PC; the initial setup must be done within your home's local network. The software follows a bulletproof, wizard-style install path; if you have a plug-and-play (UPnP) router, the whole process should take just a few minutes. Once it's up and running, the SlingPlayer software gives you a video window not unlike that of QuickTime or Windows Media Player but with channel-changing controls. If you've connected the Slingbox to a TiVo, ReplayTV, a cable or satellite box with a built-in DVR, or even a DVD recorder, you'll also get video-transport controls: pause, rewind, fast-forward, and so on.

    Right off the bat, the Slingbox's basic functions worked as advertised. We were watching our living room TV on the bedroom PC, able to flip channels at will. The SlingPlayer software automatically optimizes viewing quality, but keep in mind that this is Web video; when broadcasting to the outside world, it's also limited by the upstream bandwidth of your home's broadband connection, which is often significantly less than your downstream speed. Thanks to the indicator on the bottom right of the screen, we were able to track the bit rate of the stream in different situations. At home via a D-Link DI-624 router, we maxed out at around 1,400Kbps for wired streaming and close to 900Kbps when streaming to our wireless laptop PC. At work and even from a hotel room halfway across the country, streaming remotely from our home cable Internet connection, we achieved speeds of as much as 365Kbps, which comes close to our connection's maximum upload speed of 384Kbps.

    While the blocky video quality was nothing to write home about--especially when expanded from the small 320x240 window to full screen--it maintained an impressively smooth frame rate. Naturally, quality improved immensely at higher bit rates, but even from remote locations at 350Kbps, the video was perfectly watchable. We could easily make out CNN's news crawl, for example, but the fine print in a home loan ad was unreadable. Audio quality seemed to remain constantly decent and uninterrupted, regardless of bit rate. Keep in mind that the Slingbox isn't designed for aimless channel surfing; you'll experience a delay of a second or two when sending any commands, but it handles live TV with aplomb.

    We also tried it with a DVR, and the results were similarly satisfying, although we had to practice to get the timing right when fast-forwarding through commercials. With the delay, we'd often resume playback too late and have to rewind back to catch the first few seconds after the commercial break. Since you get essentially full control of the device, having a Slingbox means you can program your DVR remotely. On numerous occasions at work, we'd remember we wanted to program a show to begin taping before we could get home. Firing up the Slingbox software from a work PC and scheduling the recording took about a minute. In another thoughtful design touch, repeated commands queue up to transmit more quickly, so we could repeatedly press the page-down command to quickly scan the DVR's EPG, for example.

    Aside from working as advertised, one of Slingbox's biggest strengths is its frequent firmware and software updates, which have added significant functionality to the product. The SlingPlayer software now supports Windows 2000 in addition to XP, and the beta Mac client is available for download from Sling Media's Web site. Sling has also pledged that its software will work on the forthcoming Origami Ultramobile PCs. Moreover, while the onscreen interface of the original SlingPlayer software included only basic remote controls, the iteration 1.0.5.140 and thereafter actually duplicate the remote layouts for popular set-top models. For instance, the video-transport control keys (A, B, C, List, Guide, Info, and so on) of our Scientific Atlanta 8300HD were all in their familiar locations, so playing back recorded shows and accessing the onscreen electronic programming guide was second nature. Similarly, you can now switch between the Slingbox's three video inputs--say, from a TiVo to a DVD player to the analog TV tuner--straight from the application's menu, whereas older versions required you to rerun the whole setup program.

    The biggest upgrade to the Slingbox is the availability of a Windows Mobile software client. SlingPlayer Mobile brings the Slingbox experience to any touch-screen Windows Mobile handheld or smart phone (versions 4.0, 5.0, and even the older 2003 edition), so long as it has access to the Internet. We tested it on an old HP iPaq via Wi-Fi and a new Palm Treo 700w over a Verizon's EV-DO broadband cellular network, and it worked equally well in both instances. Except for the small screen size, the mobile version is a faithful re-creation of the same solid performance we've gotten on a PC. What's better, of course, is that you can use a handheld or cell phone much more often and in many more locations than you could from a desktop or laptop PC. Just be sure you have an all-you-can-eat data plan on that smart phone, or you'll have a nasty surprise at the end of the month when the bill arrives. To see the SlingPlayer Mobile software in action, check out CNET's exclusive First Look video. Sling has since released a second version of SlingPlayer Mobile, this time optimized for Windows Mobile Smartphone devices (those that lack a touch screen). The Smartphone version is still in beta, but once it's final, it will cost the same one-time $30 fee as the Pocket PC version. Both versions are available as a 30-day trial download from Sling's Web site, so you can try before you buy.

    How does the Slingbox compare to the competition? While the "placeshifting" market is fairly tiny, there is a growing number of options for copying/syncing video media from your PC to a handheld--the most notable being Apple's video-enabled iPod and TiVo To Go. But that's just transferring previously recorded media to a portable playback device. If you want live, real-time video, your options are limited. Those with newer mobile phones can opt for live 3G streaming subscriptions such as MobiTV and V Cast but will be restricted to the few channels offered by each provider. Besides the Slingbox, there's Sony's LocationFree TV and the Orb software package. The Sony costs at least $300 and enables live video transmission to the PSP or a PC, while Orb is free and offers access to other media (photos, music, and so forth) but requires a host PC with a TV tuner card to stream television programs. If you're interested in viewing your TV remotely, we found the Slingbox to be the best combination of value, ease of use, and flexibility.

    That's not to say the Slingbox is perfect. Among our gripes is the fact that it lacks any wireless networking component, so you'll need to hook up a wireless bridge or a pair of power-line adapters (such as Sling Media's own SlingLink module) if there's not an Ethernet connection in the vicinity. Furthermore, the Slingbox is only as good as its device support. And while it's improved considerably in the past few months, you'll be out of luck if it's missing remote codes for your primary video device; our Pioneer DVR-533H hard disk/DVD recorder is currently unsupported, for instance. We'd love if the Slingbox software could learn codes or allow modification of its virtual remote template, much as a PC-programmable remote. Meanwhile, the mobile client is hampered by some obvious limitations of the small screen: the miniaturized versions of your EPG, channel labels, or onscreen text, such as sports scores, news crawls, stock and quotes, may just be flat-out unreadable on many devices, as will the finer details of some quick-moving videos; for example, hockey pucks and baseballs will be hard to discern.

    That said, the Slingbox is one of the few gadgets that adds value to all your other tech investments--including the cable/satellite service, DVR, home network, laptop PC, and handheld device. Toss in the ultra-affordable $200 price (it originally went for $250), the notable lack of monthly fees, and the improved PC software and mobile client, and it's not hard to see why one of our favorite gadgets of 2005 is still an easy recommendation for 2006.

    Senior editors James Kim and David Katzmaier contributed to this review.


    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
    Let my Fred's Four Horsemen ride: Georges, Hogue, Nader, and McKay.

  13. #13
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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Old review from 2005 (newer models out) from PC mag:

    Slingbox
    REVIEW DATE: 06.30.05 $180.00

    By Bill Howard Sling Media's Slingbox scratches an itch you may not yet have. This technically impressive set-top box compresses and transfers live TV, satellite, or DVR video from your home to a computer anywhere in the world, all without requiring a PC to be up and running at home, and with minimal quality loss. Why, however, would you want to do that, when there's a TV in virtually every hotel room and friend's house around the world? It turns out there are some useful reasons as you dig deeper. But dig you must.
    Slideshow | All ShotsStreaming multimedia content from your home to a remote PC (or other device) is a hot area, and Slingbox joins a handful of other devices or services targeting this market (most notably Orb Networks, Sony Location Free TV, and TiVoToGo). The Slingbox unit connects in-line with your TV set, cable box, DVR, or a PC equipped with a TV tuner and infrared remote. It has input and outputs for virtually any kind of video, plus a wired Ethernet jack. An IR blaster controls power, channels, and play/pause on the TV, cable box, or DVR. You set it up from a PC inside your house (hence the Ethernet jack), but that's the last time you need an in-house PC running while using Slingbox. That is, unless you decide to use the Slingbox like a media hub to rebroadcast video within the house, which you can do over Ethernet, powerline networking, or Wi-Fi.
    Any PC with an Internet connection—but for all practical purposes, you need broadband—can connect and play whatever signal Slingbox is currently receiving. It's a one-to-one relationship of one player streaming to one remote PC, and the remote PC must have the proprietary SlingPlayer software installed (you can't just walk up to a Web terminal in a Key West coffeeshop and see the latest episode of whatever shows TiVo recorded last night at home).
    Though the need for a special applet seems like a drawback, it's also Slingbox's strength, because the algorithms in the proprietary software do a first-class job of providing remarkably good video quality. It's markedly better than any streaming webcast sports event or news feed. If you've got a solid broadband signal, picture quality is roughly on a par with a good videotape recording.
    Within the house, where Slingbox can use almost 1 Mbps of bandwidth, you'd have a hard time distinguishing the rebroadcast stream signal from the original. At times, we got better quality pulling video off a TiVo player three time zones away than we did from streaming the local cable provider's analog feed within the house (because of the variable quality of analog cable TV). The video initially comes up as a window, but you can expand it to full screen; the controls overlay the video (full screen) or sit adjacent (windowed). Also impressive is that the response to remote commands (such as to change the channel or pause a recording) takes just a second or two.
    As for the "why?" part of Slingbox: If you're traveling, you can catch the local news. You could use Slingbox to play a TiVo-recorded movie in your hotel room (might as well, as long as you're paying $10 a day for hotel broadband). Distant grandparents could see home movies stored on your DVR or Media Center PC; they'd just need the SlingPlayer software loaded on their PC (and a guest-access password). One or two of the channels you set up could be home security cameras that you connect to, say, your VCR's or TV's video-in jacks.
    While the concept is intriguing, there are some drawbacks with the current implementation. For starters, if you want to choose among multiple video sources, not just multiple channels fed from one source, you'll need multiple Slingboxes. The Slingbox can't stream content from a plain-vanilla PC's hard drive (it must have an IR remote), and it's not a one-to-many solution (in part because of concerns that rebroadcasting copyrighted content would put Sling Media in Hollywood's gunsights).
    Sling Media warns that setup can be tricky if you don't have a universal plug-and-play, or UPnP, router (many current ones are), or if you have multiple routers. That said, we found that even with non-UPnP routers, setup wasn't that bad, and the company provides good general instructions. All in all, Slingbox provides a fine solution for a need some people have today and more will have in the future.


    Last edited by Wesley; 05-04-2007 at 12:13 PM.
    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
    Let my Fred's Four Horsemen ride: Georges, Hogue, Nader, and McKay.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Digital Trends old review:


    l

    Features and Design

    First, let’s check out the design of this awesome little box. Slingbox is gray and small, which is very nice. It integrates well with your home theater setup and fits into those spots in your entertainment center. It has a nice rectangular shape, with three separate little squares in the middle. On the top, you’ll see words like “My Videos, My Shows, My Movies Anywhere” to remind you what Slingbox was designed for. The back features quite a few inputs that require some looking over to understand. Power, S-Video, Composite Cable, IR, Coaxial Cable, Audio Inputs and Ethernet line the back of this device. There is also a reset button that is easy to use when you need to reset your box. The front sports just two LEDs: One for power and one for network status. Because the Slingbox streams content to your PC it is limited to a relatively low resolution, thus the lack of component video or true HDTV support (although it works with HDTV equipment, it just will not output it via HDTV quality video).

    To run Slingbox properly, you’ll need decent system requirements. The Sling Media site lists the following:

    PC Client

    • Windows® XP Home/Pro/MCE or Windows 2000 SP4
    • Intel® Pentium® IV 1Ghz
    • 256MB RAM
    • 100MB Free Hard Disk Space
    • Graphics Card (24 bit)
    • Sound Card (16 bit)
    • CD-ROM Drive
    • Network Connectivity (10/100 Ethernet)

    Network

    • Router-Wired or Wireless (UpnP Capability Recommended)
    • Cable or DSL Modem (Out-of-Home viewing)
    • 256Kbps Upstream Speed (Higher Upstream Speed Recommended)

    Video (NTSC) and Audio Source

    Any of the following:

    • Analog Cable
    • Antenna/RF
    • Digital Cable Set Top Box
    • Satellite Receiver
    · Digital Video Recorder (including but not limited to TiVo®, DirecTV®, DISH®, ReplayTV®, UltimateTV®)

    You had better make sure your computer is up to the task before plunking down your hard-earned cash for this device. You won’t regret it, though, especially if you have a laptop.


    Image Courtesy of Sling Media


    Image Courtesy of Sling Media


    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
    Let my Fred's Four Horsemen ride: Georges, Hogue, Nader, and McKay.

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    Re: Slingbox - I have seen the future - OT

    Mobile Review:
    Wednesday, June 21, 2006



    In the last few years, as the price of memory cards has dropped even as their capacity has climbed, an increasing number of people have gone through the somewhat time-consuming task of converting movies or CDs so that they can be played on handhelds and smartphones.
    I'm here to ask... why bother?
    Sling Media is offering a device that lets you stream just about any kind of video or audio directly to your Windows Mobile device. All you have to do is buy a simple gadget that can convert your audio or video into a digital format in real time and broadcast it over the Internet to your handheld or smartphone.
    And, before you ask, no, you don't have to subscribe to a monthly service. Just buy the Slingbox and the software and you are good to go. You can watch your TV or a DVD wherever you are in the world, all you need is some kind of high-speed connection to the Internet.
    What Do You Mean, "High Speed"?
    I've been using the SlingPlayer Mobile software for several weeks now, under a wide variety of conditions and with several different devices, and, I have to say, I've been really impressed by its performance.
    Much of the time I've been using it on a Dell Axim X51v. This means I've been watching my home TV over a Wi-Fi connection, and shows are actually quite good. The picture is sometimes a bit pixelated, especially when things are changing rapidly, but it's better than you probably think.
    And it works pretty well over cellular-wireless networks, too. A friend of mine has a Treo 700w with EV-DO support and I got her to trying out this application. The screen is small and low resolution, but the picture was definitely viewable.
    Back to the Real World
    As I've said, the quality of the video provided by SlingPlayer Mobile is surprisingly good... but that's mostly because my expectations were really low.
    Don't get me wrong, the video quality is decent, but it's not going to suddenly turn your iPAQ into a hi-def TV. Nothing in the world can do that.
    So, if you're in a place with a real TV, you'll be happier watching that. But there are plenty of places without real TVs, or ones you can't control. Airports, hospital waiting rooms, and trains come to mind.
    SlingPlayer Mobile can keep you from losing your mind out of boredom in these situations.
    Here's an example.
    A few weeks ago, a friend and I were on a trip. As often happens, there was some kind of snafu with the airline and we were stranded for several hours. I talked my friend into downloading SlingPlayer Mobile and we were able to watch a movie on her Treo.
    Was it the best movie-watching experience of our lives? Of course not. But it kept us from staring blankly into space for several hours.
    And that's the real power of this application; it lets you watch your TV wherever you are, or even a DVD. It isn't the best video experience in the world, but there are many situations where it's better than nothing. And, if you do a great deal of traveling, I think you'll see the advantages of that.
    Usability
    OK, in the hopes that I've already convinced all of you to run out and get a Slingbox, let me talk a bit about the nuts and bolts.
    You can hook a Slingbox up to just about any kind of audio/visual device you can think of. It even includes little infrared broadcasters so you can remotely control your DVD player from, say, Hong Kong.
    Controlling the TV channels is a snap. There's an on-screen remote that looks much like any physical one, plus you can put little icons on the screen for your favorite channels.
    SlingPlayer Mobile also supports both portrait and landscape modes on most Pocket PCs.
    And you aren't just limited to Pocket PCs. There's a beta version of the software for Windows Mobile Smartphones that works quite well.
    The biggest problem you might run into is the absolute necessity of connecting the Slingbox up to an Ethernet connection. I don't know about you, but I don 't have one of these in my living room. And you people with dial-up connections are totally out of luck.
    So you have two options: you can pay someone to run Ethernet cable around your house, or you can get a gizmo offered by Sling Media that wirelessly connect the Slingbox to all that equipment in your living room.
    And, still, you people with dial-up connections are totally out of luck. If you want to use a Slingbox, you're going to have to give in and get some kind of high-speed Internet access. Sorry, but that's the way it is.
    Pricing and Availability
    The Slingbox itself is $200, while the software for Windows Mobile Pocket PCs is $30. The wireless networking do-hickey I mentioned is $100.
    The beta version for WM Smartphones is available on the Sling Media web site. It is currently free, but I suspect the final version will eventually cost the same as the Pocket PC one.
    Not surprisingly, the primary version of this application is for Windows PCs, and there's no charge for this.
    Sorry Palm OS and and Mac OS X users, at this point there's no good way for you to use a Slingbox. While there's been talk from Sling Media of a version for both these platforms, there has been no commitment on any kind of timetable for these.


    CFH HMagic bball season next year.
    Let my Fred's Four Horsemen ride: Georges, Hogue, Nader, and McKay.

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