Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Publisher
    Points: 786,139, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.4%
    Achievements:
    SocialRecommendation First ClassVeteranCreated Album pictures50000 Experience Points
    ChrisMWilliams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Des Moines
    Posts
    16,034
    Points
    786,139
    Level
    100
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 714
    Given: 187

    New front page poll question posted on DE's

    Who will Iowa State's second starting defensive end be next year opposite of Rashawn Parker?



  2. #2
    All-Star
    Points: 19,635, Level: 42
    Level completed: 77%, Points required for next Level: 215
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    VeteranCreated Album pictures10000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,405
    Points
    19,635
    Level
    42
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0

    Re: New front page poll question posted on DE's

    If it's not Pat Neil, it will be Cleyon Laing or Duane Hatfield.



  3. #3
    All-Star
    Points: 35,588, Level: 58
    Level completed: 12%, Points required for next Level: 1,062
    Overall activity: 1.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran25000 Experience Points
    CYcoFan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Ames
    Posts
    1,193
    Points
    35,588
    Level
    58
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 15
    Given: 4

    Re: New front page poll question posted on DE's

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisMWilliams View Post
    Who will Iowa State's second starting defensive end be next year opposite of Rashawn Parker?

    Let me guess you think the Super Mullet (Jared Allen) makes the Vikings D-line go as well? This question is worthless.


    Who are our DT's? How effective will they be? Everything I have heard from our coaches and saw us do last year, leads me to believe we are a one gap defense in the front 7 much like Jimmie Johnson and his Canes and Cowboys. One huge difference we lack the playmaking ability and individual difference makers at all of those positions. (Jake Knott and AJ Klein are huge upgrades at Sam and Wil backers tho)

    (the following is taken from this article Ultimate Guide to NFL Defense it is one hell of read. Scroll thru a little to read about the Miami 4-3 Front or read the rest of post either way)

    The "Miami" 4-3 Front

    Okay, so it might be a stretch to call Jimmy Johnson the lone driving force of the move back to the 4-3 front in the 1990s, in college or the professional ranks. But the attacking style of defense he brought to the NFL from his days as a college coach continues to impact the league today.

    Johnson knew he couldn't recruit successfully against the big schools in his first head coaching gig at Oklahoma State. So he recruited athletes - football talent and size was nice, but speed and athleticism were what he wanted. He simplified the 4-3 scheme to a bare bones approach. No reading and reacting, no controlling your gap assignment. Instead, he coached his players to attack, penetrate and swarm along the front seven and used simple zone coverage in the secondary. He took safeties and made them linebackers. He turned linebackers into speedy, edge rushing defensive ends. Within ten years, a huge number of college coaches followed suit and turned out the players (and coaches) that would change the face of defensive football in the NFL.

    So, what exactly is the "Miami" 4-3 front anyway?
    From a pure playbook perspective, it's nothing special, exotic or complicated. Johnson assigned everyone in the front seven a gap to attack, aligned the defensive line in an over front with the SLB off the line of scrimmage, flared his defensive ends a little wider than the more traditional 2-gap 4-3s of the day (note the strong side end in a 9-technique), played a lot of Cover-2 in the secondary and only rarely blitzed.

    But it was the attitude and team defensive speed that drove the scheme's success.
    Johnson wanted his athletic defenders exploding off the ball into their gaps. He had his front four crowd the neutral zone as much as possible without drawing penalties. The linemen were to make the offense react to them while they "read on the run" rather than simply controlling their gap then reading keys to decide what to do next. The wide alignment of the ends allowed them to get upfield quickly to get to the quarterback or disrupt a running play in the backfield. If they weren't successful, they either forced the play back to the MLB shooting his gap or pushed the play out to the pursuit, where again a LB shooting his gap could make the play. Those smaller, speedier linebackers would theoretically be protected by a couple of massive, but still quick defensive tackles that were disruptive enough to keep the linebackers (and the MLB in particular) clean to stop the run and create negative plays. The edge rushing line and swarming Cover-2 shell was designed to create turnovers against the pass.

    The last two sentences hold the key to Johnson's philosophy. The aggressive nature of this 4-3 front might allow some big plays, but the negative plays and turnovers gave the ball back to the offense quickly and with good field position if the defense itself didn't score. It worked.
    As Johnson's scheme succeeded, he was able to recruit better and better athletes and eventually work his way to the NFL. As so often happens, copycat programs in college churned out players who fit the scheme of the day. The NFL became a 4-3 league again.

    The Miami 4-3 has holes. The smaller ends and OLBs can be exploited by a good rush offense. Overpursuit can be an issue. Zone coverage is often a problem if you don't have the athletes to rush the passer. As we'll see with the Tampa-2 and the 3-4 in years to come, when everyone's running the same scheme, finding enough talent to go around weakens the whole. Though there were a myriad of other reasons, those deficiencies partly account for why Johnson's assistants never amounted to much as head coaches.

    But the era of undersized defensive players succeeding in 4-3 fronts is still going strong and its legacy is directly traceable to the success of Jimmy Johnson and the 'Miami' 4-3.
    IDP ASIDE
    If you've got any IDP experience at all, you're aware of the most common default used to decide which defensive players have the most value:
    4-3 MLB > 4-3 WLB > 4-3 SLB
    But if you're still reading, you're probably coming to the (correct) conclusion that defaults aren't good enough and that a deeper understanding of the schemes can eliminate much of the guesswork when you have close decisions to make. Put simply, all 4-3 MLBs (and WLBs or SLBs) are not alike. A MLB in an aggressive, read-on-the-run 4-3 may have different potential than a MLB in a Tampa-2 scheme or a less aggressive, read-and-react 4-3.
    In 2007, D.J. Williams drove that point home with authority. Despite concerns that a stud talent like Al Wilson had never put up big solo tackle numbers and that career OLB Williams was struggling to find himself as a MLB, the Jim Bates preferred Miami 4-3 showed yet again that its MLB is a near lock to finish with 95+ solos. From Ken Norton, Jr. to Zach Thomas to Nick Barnett to Michael Barrow in the pros to Ray Lewis and Jonathan Vilma (among others) in college, that scheme had a history of making stars out of its middle backers. Understanding the potential of the scheme made Williams a strong top ten consideration as early as May of last year, and a much safer LB1 option than many felt comfortable projecting for him. The stat line improvement may not be so dramatic for Barrett Ruud in 2009, but having Bates as his new defensive coordinator could push his solo tackle numbers even higher this season. 110-120 solos isn't out of the question if Ruud stays healthy.
    Can you get by just safely grabbing the most talented LBs available? Probably. But then you miss out on grabbing a player who you can draft a full tier below their expected production (i.e. D.J. Williams or Freddy Keiaho) or risk drafting a player a full tier above their expected production (i.e. A.J. Hawk). Those are the decisions that can mean the difference between a 7-6 team that loses in the first round of the playoffs and an 11-2 championship favored juggernaut.
    Most IDP owners eventually became aware of the added value in the WLB position in Tampa-2 defensive schemes. It was clearly the biggest "default buster position" when projecting IDPs in recent years. But it's not the only one. The changing landscape of defensive football is generating a new default busting IDP. Teams are looking for linebackers with size and versatility in coverage to match up with the league's third down backs and big tight ends. Instead of playing them at WLB and moving them into a coverage role on passing downs, coordinators are installing them on the strong side (or as a full time LLB aligning to the strong side more often than the weak side). These every-down strong side linebackers, like Michael Boley, David Thornton and Derrick Johnson in 2007 and Chad Greenway in 2008, are starting to challenge the long-held default that strong side linebackers see too many blockers to put up big IDP numbers. The Texans drafted Brian Cushing to fill a similar role and this season's top predraft linebacker prospect, Aaron Curry, may also become an every-down SLB with good IDP value.


    Last edited by CYcoFan; 04-06-2010 at 12:07 AM.

  4. #4
    Legend
    Points: 153,071, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.2%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Here nor there
    Posts
    10,860
    Points
    153,071
    Level
    100
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 379
    Given: 452

    Re: New front page poll question posted on DE's

    Quote Originally Posted by CYcoFan View Post
    Let me guess you think the Super Mullet (Jared Allen) makes the Vikings D-line go as well? This question is worthless.


    Who are our DT's? How effective will they be? Everything..............



  5. #5
    All-Star
    Points: 35,588, Level: 58
    Level completed: 12%, Points required for next Level: 1,062
    Overall activity: 1.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran25000 Experience Points
    CYcoFan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Ames
    Posts
    1,193
    Points
    35,588
    Level
    58
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 15
    Given: 4

    Re: New front page poll question posted on DE's

    Quote Originally Posted by swarthmoreCY View Post

    The facepalm wasn't created so you could just throw it around dingus, use it wisely this is not one of those times. Clearly you are Original my bad. The point since you missed it is, why focus on who the other DE is when we haven't played the Spring Game yet and there are a lot of needs not just DE.


    Last edited by CYcoFan; 04-06-2010 at 12:28 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • TV: Fox Sports 1
  • Iowa State vs. Kansas State
  • September 6, 2014
  • 11:00 AM