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  1. #1
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    Mano Eeeeeee Mano

    Mother **** bucket...

    To all of you announcers out there, mano y mano translates to 'hand and hand'.

    Is this what you mean when a cornerback is matched up man to man with a wide receiver? At the snap of the ball do they quickly extend their arms and grasp hands, readying themselves to skip down the field?

    The term 'mano y mano' gets thrown around way too much. Primarily in the sports world, but someone used it at work today, and it was not in an athletic sense. Those two were going at it mano y mano. I replied I did not see them hold hands at any point of their interaction. Everyone looked at me like I was some sort of idiot. (Hence why I put it in this forum, and not a sports-related one)

    I am not bilingual, but it really should be 'hombre a hombre' to be correct. I know, I know, mano y mano flows better, but once most realize what it really means, it sounds friggin stupid.

    Rant over.



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    Re: Mano Eeeeeee Mano

    Quote Originally Posted by BigLame View Post
    Mother **** bucket...

    To all of you announcers out there, mano y mano translates to 'hand and hand'.

    Is this what you mean when a cornerback is matched up man to man with a wide receiver? At the snap of the ball do they quickly extend their arms and grasp hands, readying themselves to skip down the field?

    The term 'mano y mano' gets thrown around way too much. Primarily in the sports world, but someone used it at work today, and it was not in an athletic sense. Those two were going at it mano y mano. I replied I did not see them hold hands at any point of their interaction. Everyone looked at me like I was some sort of idiot. (Hence why I put it in this forum, and not a sports-related one)

    I am not bilingual, but it really should be 'hombre a hombre' to be correct. I know, I know, mano y mano flows better, but once most realize what it really means, it sounds friggin stupid.

    Rant over.
    haha best. rant. ever



  3. #3
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    Re: Mano Eeeeeee Mano

    Quote Originally Posted by BigLame View Post
    Mother **** bucket...

    To all of you announcers out there, mano y mano translates to 'hand and hand'.

    Is this what you mean when a cornerback is matched up man to man with a wide receiver? At the snap of the ball do they quickly extend their arms and grasp hands, readying themselves to skip down the field?

    The term 'mano y mano' gets thrown around way too much. Primarily in the sports world, but someone used it at work today, and it was not in an athletic sense. Those two were going at it mano y mano. I replied I did not see them hold hands at any point of their interaction. Everyone looked at me like I was some sort of idiot. (Hence why I put it in this forum, and not a sports-related one)

    I am not bilingual, but it really should be 'hombre a hombre' to be correct. I know, I know, mano y mano flows better, but once most realize what it really means, it sounds friggin stupid.

    Rant over.
    I've been to Club Boheme a couple of times and witnessed situations where the terms were interchangeable.


    Wear the fox hat.

  4. #4
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    Re: Mano Eeeeeee Mano

    Yes that is the literal translation but is that what is meant when it is said by a spanish speaking individual? I don't know, I'm just asking- does it intend to mean "hand to hand" combat- like a figure of speech?

    Like when we say "There is more than one way to skin a cat." I don't think anyone intends to skin any cats.

    And if someone said hombre y hombre to a spanish speaking individual would that be like saying man on man action to an english speaking individual?



  5. #5
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    Re: Mano Eeeeeee Mano

    Technically, it should be mano-a-mano.

    From Wiki:
    Mano-a-mano is a Spanish and Italian construction meaning "hand to hand" . It was used originally for bullfights where two matadors alternate competing for the admiration of the audience.[1]
    Current Spanish usage describes any kind of competition between two people where they both compete trying to outdo each other.
    Within the Doce Pares Eskrima fighting system, it is one of the three ranges of engagement, specifically the closest one. This does not indicate solely unarmed combat.
    This term has been adopted in English with similar meaning, possibly by Ernest Hemingway. The English adoption can be likened to the phrases "one on one", "head to head", or "single combat" and conveys the idea of intense competition.


    Throwing seven different kinds of smoke!

  6. #6
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    Re: Mano Eeeeeee Mano

    Quote Originally Posted by BigLame View Post
    Mother **** bucket...

    To all of you announcers out there, mano y mano translates to 'hand and hand'.

    Is this what you mean when a cornerback is matched up man to man with a wide receiver? At the snap of the ball do they quickly extend their arms and grasp hands, readying themselves to skip down the field?

    The term 'mano y mano' gets thrown around way too much. Primarily in the sports world, but someone used it at work today, and it was not in an athletic sense. Those two were going at it mano y mano. I replied I did not see them hold hands at any point of their interaction. Everyone looked at me like I was some sort of idiot. (Hence why I put it in this forum, and not a sports-related one)

    I am not bilingual, but it really should be 'hombre a hombre' to be correct. I know, I know, mano y mano flows better, but once most realize what it really means, it sounds friggin stupid.

    Rant over.
    That would be at your local gay bar



  7. #7
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    Re: Mano Eeeeeee Mano

    Quote Originally Posted by CyGal View Post
    Technically, it should be mano-a-mano.

    From Wiki:
    Rant owned.



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