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  1. #1
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    Military slang question

    This has been driving me nuts...anybody know the slang term used in the military when airborne troops land on the ground?

    I want to say it's something like "boots dry" or "feet dry" but those don't sound right...

    So the radio call would be something like, "Chalk 4 is boots dry"...



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    Re: Military slang question

    You land in an LZ.

    If they are shooting at you then it would be called a hot LZ.

    Boots dry is the term for Cubans getting to America.



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    Re: Military slang question

    "Feet dry/Feet wet" is military slang for when an aircraft moves over land or water.


    Touch not, lest ye be touched.

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    Re: Military slang question

    I believe it is "boots on the ground".



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    Re: Military slang question

    npods, I think that's what I was thinking of...I guess I was just confusing it with troop landings...but I swear I've seen a movie or military show where the ground troops actual say they are "boots dry" when they've touched ground...but I'm probably "misremembering".

    I think "boots on the ground" is the slang term for the actual troops that are deployed.



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    Re: Military slang question

    wow damn that hurt my knee!



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    Re: Military slang question

    "PLF" 45678


    I'm baaack! See my Hot Milk For Breakfast blog under Social Groups for more details

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    Re: Military slang question

    Quote Originally Posted by clonehenge View Post
    npods, I think that's what I was thinking of...I guess I was just confusing it with troop landings...but I swear I've seen a movie or military show where the ground troops actual say they are "boots dry" when they've touched ground...but I'm probably "misremembering".

    I think "boots on the ground" is the slang term for the actual troops that are deployed.
    Don't take ANYTHING you see or hear in a movie or military show to be even remotely close to how it works in the real world.

    Even the most accurate documentaries are seldom completely accurate, even when produced by the military itself.


    "Homemade beer, after all, is like a democracy. Every so often, youíre gonna hate what comes out of it. But when itís good, itís the best." - woot.com

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    Re: Military slang question

    Quote Originally Posted by jumbopackage View Post
    Don't take ANYTHING you see or hear in a movie or military show to be even remotely close to how it works in the real world.

    Even the most accurate documentaries are seldom completely accurate, even when produced by the military itself.
    Are you telling me Van Damme's stuff is not accurate?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Re: Military slang question

    Anytime someone starts off with."back in Nam", about 90% of the time your going to hear a story that is inaccurate.



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    Re: Military slang question

    Quote Originally Posted by jumbopackage View Post
    Don't take ANYTHING you see or hear in a movie or military show to be even remotely close to how it works in the real world.

    Even the most accurate documentaries are seldom completely accurate, even when produced by the military itself.
    You mean I shouldn't put my trust in Mail Call?


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    Re: Military slang question

    Quote Originally Posted by clonehenge View Post
    This has been driving me nuts...anybody know the slang term used in the military when airborne troops land on the ground?

    I want to say it's something like "boots dry" or "feet dry" but those don't sound right...

    So the radio call would be something like, "Chalk 4 is boots dry"...

    Its "Boots on Ground" Refers to when the Jump personal has finally landed in a LZ



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    Re: Military slang question

    Some more

    100-mph tape: Official designation of Army duct tape.
    201 File:
    Military Service Jacket; a file listing all qualifications, schools, and licenses a service member has acquired during his enlistment.
    2A:
    A file for an Army soldier listing all relevant duty and qualification data; different from a 201 file.
    550 cord:
    Lightweight nylon cord that has 550 lbs. of tensile strength. This is the same cord that is used in the construction of parachutes.
    6:
    Radio jargon for the leader of an element. Usually proceeded by a Company designation and then a number to denote what part of that unit he commands. For example: Capt. Fish is in charge of a high speed Ranger company, Charlie Company. His radio call sign is C-0-6 (Charlie zero six). Capt. Fish then makes a bad decision and gets pulled from his position as company commander and made platoon leader of 1st Platoon. His call sign is now C-1-6 (Charlie one six).
    AAM:
    Air-to-Air Missiles.
    Aboard:
    On base.
    ACC:
    Air Combat Command.
    ADP: The Advanced Development Programs run by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics at a site in Palmdale, CA;
    also known by its more memorable nickname: the “Skunk Works.”
    A.F.R.T.S:
    The American Forces Radio and Television Service; pronounced “a-farts.”
    AFA:
    The Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO
    AFB:
    Air Force Base.
    AFSC:
    Air Force Specialty Code (which is different for each job in the Air Force).
    AFSOC:
    Air Force Special Operations Command.
    AFSPC:
    Air Force Space Command.
    AIA:
    Air Intelligence Agency.
    Airborne Shuffle:
    Double time marching (running in formation).
    Airboss:
    A seaman responsible for safely operating a carrier flight deck.
    Air Force Blues:
    The standard blue Air Force uniform.
    AIT:
    Advanced Individual Training.
    “Alice” Pack:
    All-purpose, Lightweight Individual Carrying Equipment - backpack worn by Army and Marine personnel.
    All Hands:
    A term used to refer to everyone in the unit.
    AO:
    Area of Operations.
    APFT:
    Army Physical Fitness Test.
    ARPA:
    Advanced Research Projects Agency.
    ARTEP:
    Army Training and Evaluation Program.
    “As You Were”:
    An order meaning to resume typical activities, commonly given after a group is called to attention by the presence of an officer.
    A -Team:
    see ODA
    Ate Up:
    Army slang for something or someone lacking any resemblance of military bearing (e.g. “that guy is ate up”).
    Athwartships:
    Naval term for moving from side to side, or sitting astride something.
    AWACS:
    Airborne Warning and Control System.
    AWC:
    Air Warfare Center, located at Nell’s AFB, NV.
    AWOL:
    Absent With Out Leave: Terminology used by the Army and Air Force to describe a soldier/airman that has not reported for duty after 24 hours. This could be caused by someone not knowing they were scheduled for duty or it could be a deliberate attempt to desert from the military. The Navy and Marines use Unauthorized Absence (UA).
    BAC:
    Basic Airborne Course - the three week course of instruction at Ft. Benning, Ga. that all US military Airborne-qualified personnel attend to gain that status. Commonly known as Jump School.
    Back in Battery:
    Slang for “ready for action”.
    Barn:
    A hangar; a building for storing and sheltering aircraft.
    BAS:
    Battalion Aid Station - this is the location that injured soldiers are brought to when they leave the CCP. The Battalion PA and Surgeon (if assigned) will be located here as well as a staff of medics.
    Batten Down:
    Naval term for making secure, or shutting.
    BDA:
    Battle Damage Assessment.
    BDU:
    Battle Dress Uniform; also known as “fatigues.”
    Beach:
    To put ashore (e.g. “He screwed up and they beached him”).
    BFV:
    Bradley Fighting Vehicle.
    Big Chicken Dinner:
    Slang for a bad conduct discharge.
    Billet:
    A troop shelter.
    Binnacle List:
    Sick list.
    Bird:
    Military slang for aircraft.
    Bird Farm:
    Slang for an aircraft carrier.
    Blouse:
    Slang for a military uniform jacket.
    Blue on Blue:
    Naval slang for a friendly fire kill.
    “Blues”:
    Another name for the traditional Marine blue dress uniform.
    Blue Falcon:
    A very skilled parachute demonstration team stationed in Italy. More commonly, slang for a soldier who is labeled with B.F., which is short for a buddy faker.
    BLUFOR:
    Other friendly forces in an area, so-called because of the blue helmets worn by U.N. forces.
    BMT:
    Basic Military Training, which is carried out at Lackland AFB outside San Antonio, TX.
    BN:
    Battalion.
    BOHICA:
    “Bend Over, Here It Comes Again.”
    Boon Dockers:
    Naval Enlisted steel toed work shoes/boots. Heavy and ungainly boots that don't give any ankle support, and are the first thing that personnel do their damnedest to get Flight Deck boots (or reinforced paratrooper boots).
    “Boondocks”:
    Slang for swamps, deep woodland areas, small towns, or anywhere far from civilization; also referred to as “the boonies” or “the sticks.”
    “Boot”:
    Short for “boot camp,” or Marine basic training; also, slang term for a new Marine or a Marine recruit.
    Boot:
    Naval slang for a rookie seaman.
    BOTS:
    Basic Officer Training Program at the Air Force Officer Training School.
    Bracket:
    In shipboard gunnery, when one salvo lands to the left of the target and one salvo lands to the right of the target; usually followed by a direct hit.
    Brass:
    Slang for one or more commissioned officers (i.e. “the brass”).
    Bravo Zulu:
    “Well done”.
    Breaking bush:
    Slang for moving cross country by avoiding trails and roads. Typically used by the infantry.
    Brownshoe:
    Naval slang for a member of the aviation community.
    Bubblehead:
    Slang for a member of the submarine community; also, slang for a diver.
    Buck:
    Army slang for a soldier of the lowest rank, as in “buck private” or “buck sergeant” (which refer to E-1 and E-5, respectively).
    Butter Bar:
    Army slang for a 2nd Lieutenant, so called because of the gold bar he’s given as rank insignia.
    BX:
    Base Exchange - a store on Air Force bases that offers reduced prices on many goods.
    Cammies:
    Slang for camouflaged fatigues, or BDUs. Most commonly used by Marines, and occasionally Navy personnel, usually Corpsmen that have served with Marine units. The Army uses BDUs and DCUs exclusively.
    CAP:
    Combat Air Patrol - a mission flown by combat aircraft to attack enemy troops that are engaged in ground combat with friendly forces.
    “Carry On”:
    See “As you were.”
    CAS:
    Close Air Support operation - a mission flown by combat aircraft to attack enemy troops that are engaged in ground combat with friendly forces.
    CAX:
    Combined arms exercise - a training operation involving troops from multiple combat arms at once (e.g. infantry, armor, artillery, and aviation).
    CCP:
    Casualty Collection Point - the location that a company First Sergeant or lead medic designates to bring all casualties for additional medical treatment after the initial evaluation/treatment by the platoon medic.
    CCT:
    Combat Controller (an Air Force Special Operations Force).
    CGAS:
    Coast Guard Air Station - a self-contained aviation facility operating fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters, or both.
    Chair Force:
    Army slang for the U.S. Air Force, referring to the fact few Air Force personnel ever see combat.
    Channel Fever:
    A strong desire to reach home, or a friendly port.
    Chalk:
    A group of troops who are all designated to ride in the same aircraft, typically members of the same squad or team, but not always.
    Cheng:
    Slang for Chief Engineer; pronounced “Chang.”
    Cherry:
    A new guy.
    Chicken of the Sea:
    Slang for a boomer submarine, or its crew.
    Chow:
    Slang for food.
    CMC:
    Commandant of the Marine Corps.
    CMOC:
    Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center, formerly the NORAD Combat Operations Center.
    CNICs:
    Commanders-in-Chief.
    CJCS:
    Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    C.O.:
    Commanding Officer; also called a “Charlie Oscar.”
    CO:
    Company.
    Coastie:
    Slang for a Coast Guard sailor; also called a “mud duck.”
    Coffin:
    Slang for a bunk or bed.
    Colors:
    Slang for the American Flag, as well as the ceremony for raising and lowering the Flag.
    Company-Grade:
    A group of Air Force, Army, and Marine officer ranks containing pay grades O-1 through O-3 (lieutenants and captains); a company-grade officer only commands troops under his direct control - hence the name, as a company is the largest formation an officer can personally command on a battlefield with any degree of effectiveness.
    CONUSA:
    Continental United States Army.
    Corpsman:
    A Navy medic.
    COTS:
    Commissioned Officer Training Program at the Air Force Officer Training School.
    Cover:
    Slang for a hat or other headgear.
    CP:
    Command Post - Army term for any location that a leader picks as his "I will make decisions from here" point. Unit offices are also known as a CP when in garrison.
    CQ:
    Charge of Quarters - a duty performed in each barracks. Usually consisting of 24 hours of continuous duty maintaining order, cleanliness, and a log of all visitors. Conducted by an NCO and another soldier who is a runner. At the end of the 24 hours, the soldiers are given 24 hours off. Plot note: This is a good way to start off a mission in the SGC as the duty is rotated amongst non-essential personnel (i.e., SG team members and base staff that aren't in a command or critical position).
    CQB:
    Close Quarters Battle - a type of combat that typically occurs in distances less than 25 meters. Practiced extensively by Special Operations personnel for the conduct of hostage rescue and direct action missions in urban environments. Considered much more effective than standard MOUT tactics. In recent years, it has started filtering down to conventional units to the degree that they are actually starting to practice it, though not as often or extensively as SOFs in general.
    CRO:
    Combat Rescue Officer - a newly created pararescue slot (previously, all pararescue personnel were enlisted).
    Crunchy:
    Slang used by tank drivers to refer to any non-armor personnel, referring to the crunching sound tank drivers claim people make when run over.
    CSAR:
    Combat Search and Rescue.
    Deck:
    Slang for the floor.
    Deck Ape:
    A nickname for the ship's Boatswains Mates whom carry out the traditional duties of 'Sailors' from the past... Also used for personnel manning sides on the liberty boats during liberty in foreign ports of call.
    D.I.:
    Drill instructor - the most feared man in a new recruit’s life.
    DI:
    Dismounted Infantry; in the Marine Corps, DI is the acronym for Drill Instructor, the Marine equivalent of a drill sergeant; in the Army, drill sergeants do not respond well to being called “DI” by recruits.
    Dining Hall:
    An Air Force cafeteria (which is never referred to as a “mess hall”).
    Dirt Sailor:
    Seabee
    DIV:
    Division.
    Dixie Cup:
    Slang for the U.S. Navy sailor’s white hat; also known as a “dog dish”.
    Dog Watch:
    The watch shifts between 1600 (4 p.m.) to 1800 (6 p.m.) and 1800 (6 p.m.) to 2000 (8 p.m.).
    Double Time:
    Slang meaning “to run” (i.e. “Double time it, boy!”).
    Dormitory:
    The shared living accommodations for Air Force personnel (which is never referred to as a “barracks”).
    DoD:
    The Department of Defense.
    Drill:
    Any practice or exercise, usually designed to be as boring and repetitive as humanly possible; also a nickname for Army Drill Sergeants.
    D.S.A.:
    Dumb “Soldier” Attack, usually in reference to a soldier forgetting something that he has no business forgetting.
    Dungarees:
    The work uniform worn by enlisted navy personnel. Dark blue denim bell-bottoms, light blue chambray shirt (long or short-sleeved). So named since naval personnel use to make their uniforms out of scrap dungaree material from old sails.
    DZ:
    Drop Zone - the area where paratroopers are supposed to land after a jump.
    “Eighth and Eye”:
    Marine slang for the Marine Barracks in Washington D.C., home of the Marine Corps Commandant’s House, so named for its address.
    Element:
    Unit.
    EMT:
    Emergency Medical Technician - a qualification held by Air Force pararescuemen.
    Ensign Locker:
    Naval slang for junior officer berths.
    Enswine:
    Derogatory term for an ensign.
    EPW:
    Enemy prisoners of war. This is the term used to describe captured enemy soldiers; POW is reserved for captured US/friendly troops. The two terms are not interchangeable.
    EW:
    Electronic Warfare, including the disruption of enemy communications and tracking systems.
    Eyelid Maintenance:
    To sleep. Terminology to make sleeping sound official. Usually used in a pleading manner.
    “Eyes and ears”:
    Goggles and earplugs. Standard packing list items in almost every instance in the modern military.
    Fartsack:
    Army slang for a sleeping bag.
    FAV:
    Fast Attack Vehicle - a lightweight vehicle occasionally used by Special Forces for reconnaissance operations.
    FD:
    Fire Direction.
    Fiddler’s Green:
    Sailor’s heaven
    Field Rat:
    Army slang for a soldier who seems more at home in the field than in garrison.
    Field-Grade:
    A group of Air Force, Army, and Marine officer ranks containing pay grades O-4 through O-6 (majors and colonels); a field-grade officer commands troops whom he doesn’t see on a daily basis.
    Fish:
    Naval slang for a torpedo.
    Five Jump Chump:
    Army slang for any person wearing Airborne wings whose only previous jumps are the five required for graduation; not considered “real” paratroopers by Airborne personnel.
    Flag:
    Slang for an admiral; also known as a “flag officer.”
    Flag-Grade:
    A group of Air Force, Army, and Marine officer ranks containing pay grades O-7 and above (generals and admirals); a flag-grade officer commands troops on a mass scale; historically, a flag-grade officer could fly his own flag on the battlefield (or on his flagship) after he received his first star.
    Flame-Out:
    An engine failure in a jet aircraft.
    Flight:
    The basic unit of organization in the Air Force.
    Flight Line:
    The active area of an airfield; also a non-existent item that new airmen are sent to look for as a practical joke (e.g. “Run to the other hangar and get me a 50-ft. spool of flight line”).
    FLIR:
    Vehicular forward-looking infra-red system.
    “Float”:
    Slang for deployment at sea.
    Flying a Desk:
    Slang for any ground assignment given to a pilot.
    FM:
    Field Manual.
    FMF:
    Fleet Marine Force - the Marine unit deployed with a Navy carrier strike group.
    FO:
    Forward Observer.
    FORSCOM:
    U.S. Army Forces Command.
    Fourth Point of Contact:
    Mikta - taken from the points of contact of a good parachute landing fall (PLF). ("Pop your head out of your fourth point of contact!")
    FRIES:
    Vehicular fast-rope insertion system.
    Front Leaning Rest Position:
    The Army name for the starting position of a push-up. Regularly used for on-the-spot corrections (i.e., minor punishments).
    FSO:
    Fire Support Officer.
    F.T.A.:
    “Fun, Travel and Adventure”; usually seen written on shipping crates or occasionally on the sides of soldiers’ helmets.
    FTR:
    Failure to Report. Classification given to a service member who hasn't shown up at an appointed location and time, but has been gone less than 24 hours. Usually followed by an AWOL classification.
    FTX:
    Field Training Exercise.
    F.U.B.A.R.:
    ****ed-Up Beyond All Recognition. Really, really, really broken, or really, really, really not right.
    Full Bird:
    A colonel, so called because of the eagle on his rank insignia.
    Galley:
    A Kitchen or chow hall.
    Ganked:
    Slang meaning “stolen”.
    Geedunk:
    Slang for snack food, such as candy, potato chips, or soft drinks; also slang for a location where such snacks can be purchased.
    General Quarters:
    The call for all hands to man battle stations.
    G.I.:
    As a noun, any Army personnel; as an adjective, any Army-issue gear; as a verb, to thoroughly clean something (e.g. “I gotta G.I. the barracks”).
    Grunt:
    An Army soldier, almost exclusively referring to the infantry; also known as a “ground pounder”.
    Guerrilla Drills:
    A specialized form of PT where buddy-assisted exercises and buddy-carries are emphasized.
    Gun Bunny:
    Army slang for a member of the artillery.
    Gundecking:
    Slang for falsifying reports, records, and similar documents.
    Gung Ho:
    Slang for a member of the Armed Forces who’s highly motivated and/or ready to fight.
    HALO:
    High Altitude/Low Opening - a method of deploying special operations troops by dropping them from an altitude where aircraft are unlikely to be spotted and not deploying chutes until the last moment.
    HAHO:
    High Altitude/High Opening – The opposite of HALO, the parachute is deployed immediately upon exiting the aircraft and allowing the paratrooper to travel 70 to 150 miles on average, depending on wind and weather conditions.
    Handler:
    Naval Officer whose duties is to oversee and manage the safe operations of the Flight Deck (and to a lesser extent Hanger Deck). Their duties include the disposition of aircraft onboard a carrier, as an example to perform maintenance on an aircraft that could possibly keep it form flight status must me approved by the Handler. The Handler also must be informed if aircraft maintenance requires the aircraft in question to be 'suspended' for work to be carried out on the airframe since the handler has to go through the Ship's Bridge to make sure no high-speed maneuvers are going to be attempted during said period of time.
    Head:
    Slang for the bathroom.
    HHC:
    Headquarters and Headquarters Company, usually the command element of a battalion sized element or larger.
    High Speed, Low Drag:
    Army slang for “excellent”, usually in reference to gear. “High speed” by itself refers to personnel (e.g. “Sgt. Trester is one high speed individual”).
    Hollywood Jump:
    A jump where only the minimum amount of equipment, e.g. helmet and load carrying equipment, are worn and no weapon is carried. Usually done for pay purposes.
    Hollywood Shower:
    An excessively long shower.
    Hull Down:
    Naval term for a ship when only her upper section can be seen over the horizon; also a military term for a tank when only its turret can be seen over cover.
    “Hump”:
    Slang meaning to march overland (i.e. “We have to hump it how far?”).
    ICBM:
    Intercontinental Ballistic Missile.
    IDAS/MATT:
    Interactive Defense Avionics System/Multimission Advance Tactical Terminal, installed in the latest configuration of the AFSOC MH-53J III E helicopter.
    IFT:
    Introductory Flight Training.
    INSCOM:
    The U.S. Army Intelligence and Service Command.
    Jar Head:
    Army slang for a Marine, more in reference to the “high and tight” haircut Marines favor than to the actual contents of a Marine’s head.
    JCS:
    Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    Jet Jockey:
    A jet fighter pilot.
    JMPI:
    Jump Master Personnel Inspection - an inspection made by a qualified Jumpmaster to spot any defects or improperly worn parachute items. Generally a 2 to 3 hour wait (in gear) for a 2 minute inspection.
    Joe:
    Slang for coffee. In the Army, it is also used to generalize soldiers of the rank of Specialist or below.
    Jolly Green Giant:
    Slang for the HH-53 helicopter.
    JSUPT:
    Joint Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training.
    K.P.:
    A work detail in which those involved are assigned to work in the mess hall, assisting in meal preparation; stands for “Kitchen Personnel,” though it is also called “Kitchen Patrol,” “Kitchen Police,” and “Keep Peeling,” for the stereotypical punishment of peeling potatoes seen in old war movies.
    K-Pot:
    Army slang for a Kevlar ground troop helmet.
    KISS:
    An acronym for Keep It Simple, Stupid. Probably most popularized by Richard Marcinko's Rogue Warrior in the early '90s.
    Leatherneck:
    Slang for a Marine, referring to the leather collar once issued as part of the Marine dress uniform.
    Leave:
    Vacation.
    LEDET:
    Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment - a small Coast Guard unit on board a U.S. Navy ship that provides sworn federal law enforcement officers for sanctioned boarding operations.
    Leg:
    Army slang for a non-Airborne soldier; also called a “Dirty Leg.”
    Liberty:
    A pass for up to 4 days’ R&R. Called a Pass in the Army.
    Lifer Dog:
    Slang for a career serviceman.
    Light Colonel:
    Army slang for a Lieutenant Colonel.
    Little Birds:
    To the unknowing, this usually represents any military helicopter smaller than a UH-60. To those in the know, Little Birds are the MH-6 helicopters of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment.
    LTA:
    Launch Tube Assembly.
    LRP:
    (pronounced Lurp, not Larp) Long Range Patrol. See also LRRP which it is usually mistakenly used to represent.
    LRRP:
    (also pronounced Lurp) Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol. The stereotypical mission of Rangers from Vietnam on, this is actually given to highly specialized units now.
    LRS:
    Long Range Surveillance. The current evolution of the Long Range Reconnaissance mission.
    LRSD:
    Companies of Infantry personnel attached to Military Intelligence Battalions and Corps-level units to conduct deep reconnaissance and surveillance of enemy targets and more abstractly, a given zone. While not Special Operations personnel per se, they are about as close as you can get to it, attending most of the special skills schools and meeting most of the same physical requirements. Additionally, they must be Basic Airborne and Ranger-qualified or willing to attend Ranger School to even apply. (US Army-specific unit)
    LZ:
    Landing Zone, usually for helicopters.
    Ma Deuce:
    Army slang for a .50 M2 heavy machine gun.
    MACOM:
    Major Commands.
    MCM:
    Manual for Courts-Martial — The document that prescribes how a military court martial is to be conducted.
    MCT:
    Marine Combat Training.
    MEB:
    Marine Expeditionary Brigade.
    MEDEVAC:
    Medical Evacuation.
    MEF:
    Marine Expeditionary Force.
    Messcrank: Slang for food service personnel, especially non-rated (i.e. non-commissioned) personnel.
    METT-T:
    Mission, Enemy, Terrain, Troops, And Time Available - the standard formula for planning and conducting Army operations.
    MEU:
    Marine Expeditionary Unit.
    M.F.I.C.:
    “The Man in Charge,” usually used in reference to one’s self in a loud and forceful voice, when the speaker is, in fact, the M.F.I.C. Literally means ‘Mother ****** in Charge’.
    MOPP:
    Mission-Oriented Protective Posture.
    MOS:
    Military Occupational Specialty.
    MREs:
    Meals Ready to Eat — Standard military rations.
    MSST:
    Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Teams (MSST) - a permanently assigned Coast Guard unit responsible for securing a major U.S. port.
    Mustang:
    Slang for an officer who began his career as an enlisted man.
    Navy Shower:
    A shower using as little water as possible.
    NCA:
    National Command Authorities - the President and the Secretary of Defense, or their duly deputized alternates or successors.
    NCO:
    Noncommissioned Officer.
    NCOIC:
    Abbreviation for Non-Commissioned Officer-in-Charge.
    NME:
    National Military Establishment - the predecessor to the Department of Defense.
    NOD:
    Nightvision Goggles, terminology typically used by the Infantry.
    NODL:
    Night Observation Device, Long Range.
    No Joy:
    Pilot jargon for “I do not see the threat or target.”
    “No Load”:
    Marine slang for a trooper who doesn’t carry his own weight.
    NOE:
    Nap of the Earth — Flying very low to avoid detection by enemy radar.
    NORAD:
    North American Aerospace Defense Command, located in the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station, under a mountain near Colorado Springs, CO.
    NSC:
    National Security Council.
    NVG:
    Nightvision goggles, a variant nomenclature used by less fieldy units.
    ODA:
    Operational Detachment A (pronounced phonetically for Alpha), a Special Forces team consisting of 12 men, a Detachment Commander, Detachment XO, Operations and Intelligence Sergeant, Asst. Operations and Intelligence Sergeant, two Weapons Sergeants, two Engineer Sergeants, 2 Communications Sergeants, and 2 Medical Sergeants.
    OIC:
    Abbreviation for Officer-in-Charge.
    Old Man, The:
    Army slang for a company or battalion commander.
    OP:
    Observation Post.
    OPFOR:
    Opposing Forces.
    Oscar:
    A dummy used for man overboard drills.
    Oscar Brothers:
    Slang for the CO and XO of a ship.
    OSUT:
    One Station Unit Training.
    OTS:
    The Officer Training School at Maxwell AFB in Montgomery, Alabama.
    Overhead:
    Naval slang for ceiling.
    PACOM:
    U.S. Pacific Command.
    PAST:
    Physical Abilities and Stamina Test - a grueling trial of swimming, running, and exercise that qualifies candidates to apply for a position as a pararescueman or combat controller with AFSOC.
    PC:
    Patrol Cap. The Army baseball-type cap worn with the uniform.
    PC:
    Precious Cargo - the terminology used by Special Operations personnel to classify any kind of object needing to be recovered.
    Peeping Tom:
    Slang for an F-14 Tomcat air superiority fighter outfitted for reconnaissance duty.
    PJ:
    Pararescue Jumper (an Air Force Special Operations Force).
    PL:
    Platoon Leader.
    PLF:
    Parachute Landing Fall - the structured way that a paratrooper is taught to hit the ground to minimize the chances of injury in static line airborne operations. When conducted correctly the paratrooper should hit the ground and look like the rocker of a rocking chair on the ground.
    Plank Owner:
    Naval slang for a member of a ship’s original commissioned crew.
    PLT:
    Platoon.
    Pogey Bait:
    Slang for candy and snacks, especially when brought into the field.
    Pogue:
    A term used to describe anyone not in a combat arms career field. It is used both in derogatory and explanatory manners.
    Pork Chop:
    Slang for a supply officer.
    POW:
    A captured US or friendly nation soldier. Not to be used to describe enemy soldiers who have been captured.
    Prop Wash:
    The turbulence created behind an aircraft propeller; also a non-existent item that new recruits are sent to look for as a practical joke (e.g. “Get me a gallon of prop wash from the store room”).
    PSG:
    Platoon Sergeant.
    PSU:
    Coast Guard Port Security Unit - a rapidly deployable Coast Guard reserve unit used to provide or supplement security at foreign ports as needed.
    PT:
    Physical Training, military calisthenics.
    PT Score:
    One of the most important numbers in the Army, it is the score a soldier earns on a standardized physical test between 0-300 on the standard scale.
    Pucker Factor:
    Slang for the measure of stress inherent in a situation.
    Punch Out:
    To eject from an aircraft.
    PX:
    Post Exchange.
    P.X.
    Commando: Army slang for a soldier who wears badges and awards he purchased at the Post Exchange, rather than earned through his own merit.
    PZ:
    Pickup Zone - essentially the opposite of a LZ, this is the spot where helicopters/aircraft will land to extract troops. Although Hollywood portrays these zones to always be called LZs, the real military always uses this distinction to eliminate any confusion with other units as to what part of the mission is going on.
    Q Course:
    The Special Forces Qualification Course. This course follows SFAS, not necessarily immediately though, and is where Special Forces candidates actually learn how to be Special Forces in their respective MOSs.
    Rack:
    Slang for a bed; also known as a “bunk”.
    Rain Locker:
    Slang for a shower.
    Ranger Roll:
    A typical rolling of a Soldier’s PC. Unauthorized for wear in all but Special Operations units, though many conventional soldiers still do push ups on a daily basis to wear it.
    Ranger Games:
    Any group of hazing activities conducted by higher ranking soldiers on lower ranking soldiers in an attempt to make them look foolish, stupid, inexperienced or some combination thereof.
    Rate Grabber:
    Slang for a seaman who behaves as if he’s of a higher rate (i.e. rank).
    Red Flag:
    Realistic aerial combat exercises held at the Air Warfare Center.
    Ring Knocker:
    Naval slang for a U.S. Naval Academy graduate.
    RIO:
    Naval Radar Intercept Officer.
    ROTC:
    The Reserve Officer Training Corps at U.S. colleges.
    Rotorhead:
    Slang for a helicopter pilot or crew.
    RRD:
    Ranger Reconnaissance Detachment - several teams of specially selected Rangers that provide various types of intelligence and reconnaissance capabilities in support of Special Operations Forces primarily.
    RTO:
    Radio Telephone Operator; a.k.a. RATELLO.
    Rug Dance:
    Slang for receiving verbal discipline from a senior officer.
    SALUTE:
    Size, Activity, Location, Unit, Type, and Equipment - Essential information gathered each time contact is made with enemy forces.
    Scope Dope:
    Naval slang for a seaman who mans a radar station.
    Screw the Pooch:
    To make a serious mistake; to mess up.
    SECDEF:
    Secretary of Defense.
    Simper Fi:
    Short for Simper Fidelis, the Marine Corps motto; also Latin for “always faithful.”
    SERE:
    Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape training provided to Air Force pilots and AFSOC personnel, for use when the pilots are grounded in enemy territory.
    Sewer Pipe:
    Naval slang for a submarine.
    SFAS:
    Special Forces Assessment and Selection - a 28-day selection course where candidates are evaluated on their aptitude to fit into the SF community and to perform to standard. Upon selection, the student will attend the Q-Course.
    Sham:
    To goof off; to be lazy; to hide from work details and the chain of command in an attempt to do nothing.
    Sidebouys:
    A naval honor guard used when VIPs arrive onboard, or leave a naval vessel. The Number of Sidebouys indicated the level of importance of the visiting dignitary or flag officer.
    SINCGARS:
    Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System - the Army’s standard field radio.
    Six:
    Six o’clock (rear) position (e.g. “Watch your six”).
    Skating:
    Naval equivalent of sham. Someone exceptionally good at it would be said to earn the "Golden Skates."
    Skimmer:
    Naval slang for a surface ship, or its officers and crew.
    Skipper:
    Naval slang for a commanding officer.
    Skivvies:
    Slang for underwear.
    Skylarking:
    Slang for goofing off or screwing around.
    Slick Sleeve:
    Slang for Airman Basic, the Air Force’s lowest enlisted rank, which bears no sleeve insignia.
    Small Boy:
    Frigate or destroyer, esp. one serving in a carrier battle group.
    SMCT:
    Soldier's Manual of Common Tasks.
    Smoke:
    A physical punishment consisting of calisthenics or other physically demanding activities in an effort to correct a mistake. “He smoked the _ out of me.”
    SNAFU:
    Situation Normal, All ****ed-Up
    Snake Eater:
    Slang for Special Operations personnel, typically Army Special Forces.
    SOF:
    Special Operations - Operations that encompass the use of small units in direct or indirect military actions focused on strategic or operational objectives. These operations require units with a combination of trained, specialized personnel, gear, and tactics that exceed the routine capabilities of conventional military forces. Special Operations are characterized by certain attributes that cumulatively distinguish them from conventional operations. They are politically sensitive missions where only the best-equipped and most proficient forces must be deployed to avoid detection and possible mission failure that might result in damage to U.S. prestige and interests.
    SOP:
    Standard Operating Procedures.
    Soup-sandwich:
    Derogatory term for a soldier that is deemed worthless in his abilities.
    SPIES:
    Special Patrol Insertion/Extraction System - a method of insertion and extraction of small teams. The descendant of STABO operations, SPIES is safer and more effective allowing an entire team to be extracted on the same rope.
    Spoon:
    Army slang for a cook.
    Spotlight Ranger:
    A soldier that takes every opportunity to correct other soldiers in front of the leadership to make himself look smarter or more skilled.
    Squad Bay:
    A large barracks room, within which lives an entire squad.
    Squadron:
    An air contingent composed of multiple ‘flights’.
    Squared Away:
    Army slang for any person displaying exemplary soldiering skills or military bearing; also used in reference to equipment or facilities, meaning to get the items in question ready for use, storage, or inspection.
    Squid:
    Army slang for U.S. Naval personnel.
    SR-71 Blackbird:
    A high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft known for its extreme speed.
    S.S.D.D.:
    “Same Situation, Different Day”.
    STABO:
    An old system of extracting one to four soldiers by 150 foot ropes dangling from a helicopter. The main disadvantage is that only one soldier (or two with a special Joes rig) could be extracted per rope. Primarily used for jungle extractions over short distances. It has been replaced by the SPIES system now.
    Stateroom:
    An officer’s berth.
    Steel Beach:
    Naval slang for a barbecue on the flight deck.
    Stick:
    See Chalk. This is the more archaic term for the same thing.
    STS:
    Special Tactics Squadron (an Air Force Special Operations Force).
    STT:
    Special Tactics Team (an Air Force Special Operations Force).
    T-37/T-38:
    Light jet aircraft used for training.
    TARFU: Things are worse than a SNAFU, but at least they aren't FUBAR'd
    yet.
    Target:
    Submariner’s term for a surface vessel.
    T.I.:
    Training Instructor - an individual’s personal trainer for the duration of his stay in Basic Military Training.
    TIG:
    Time in Grade - the length of time an individual has held his current rank.
    TIS:
    Time in Service - the length of time an individual has served.
    Top:
    Army slang for First Sergeant; also “First Shirt.”
    TO&E:
    Tables of Organization and Equipment - a list of all equipment authorized for a unit.
    TOC:
    Tactical Operations Center - This is usually found at Battalion level or higher and is the point where the Battalion Commander and all of the various S-shops come together to make tactical decisions for subordinate units in the field.
    TRAP:
    Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel - Marine term for aviation search and rescue operations.
    TRP:
    Target Reference Points.
    TRADOC:
    The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command.
    Turn Turtle:
    Naval slang meaning “to capsize”.
    U-2:
    A high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft.
    UA:
    Unauthorized Absence, see AWOL.
    UCMJ:
    Uniform Code of Military Justice.
    USAF:
    United States Air Force.
    UXO:
    Unexploded Ordnance.
    VCJCS:
    Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    Wing:
    An air contingent composed of multiple squadrons.
    Wire Monkey:
    Communications specialist so called because of the hundreds of yards of communication wire he strings throughout a camp.
    WVR:
    Within Visual Range, descriptive of an air combat engagement.
    Watch:
    A duty shift.
    Weather Deck:
    Naval slang for any deck exposed to weather.
    WILCO:
    “Will comply”; a response reserved for naval unit commanders.
    Wizzo:
    Air Force, Marine and Army Aviation Weapons & Sensors Officer
    XO:
    Executive Officer; in the Navy, the second in command of a ship.
    Zero:
    Derogatory term for an officer.
    ZULU Time:
    Greenwich Mean Time.


    Airboss:
    Naval Officer whose duties is to oversee and manage flight operations on an Aircraft Carrier. An Airboss has the authority to order a pilot to ditch their aircraft instead of attempting a possible unsafe carrier landing if unable to reach a shore facility. I can't remember if the officer in charge of flight operation of a Naval Air Station is also called an Airboss. But I think it is...
    Handler:
    Naval Officer whose duties is to oversee and manage the safe operations of the Flight Deck (and to a lesser extent Hanger Deck). Their duties include the disposition of aircraft onboard a carrier, as an example to perform maintenance on an aircraft that could possibly keep it form flight status must me approved by the Handler. The Handler also must be informed if aircraft maintenance requires the aircraft in question to be 'suspended' for work to be carried out on the airframe since the handler has to go through the Ship's Bridge to make sure no high-speed maneuvers are going to be attempted during said period of time.
    Sparks:
    Nickname given to naval enlisted communications personnel. Comes from the Radioman's Rating insignia of electrical sparks.
    "Blackshoe":
    Nickname given to the firemen (Engineers) in the Navy.
    Boondockers:
    Naval Enlisted steel toed work shoes/boots. Heavy and ungainly boots that don't give any ankle support, and are the first thing that personnel do their damnedest to get Flight Deck boots (or reinforced paratrooper boots).
    Dungarees:
    The work uniform worn by enlisted navy personnel. Dark blue denim bell-bottoms, light blue chambray shirt (long or short-sleeved). So named since naval personnel use to make their uniforms out of scrap dungaree material from old sails.
    Blue Jackets Handbook:
    A manual on naval operations issued to enlisted naval personnel when they enter Boot Camp.
    Deck Ape:
    A nickname for the ship's Boatswains Mates whom carry out the traditional duties of 'Sailors' form the past... Also used for personnel manning sides on the liberty boats during liberty in foreign ports of call.
    Sidebouys:
    A naval honor guard used when VIPs arrive onboard, or leave a naval vessel. The Number of Sidebouys indicated the level of importance of the visiting dignitary or flag officer.

    USARC: U.S. Army Reserve Command.
    USAREUR: U.S. Army Command, Europe.
    USARPAC: U.S. Army Command, Pacific.
    USARSO: U.S. Army Command, South.
    USASOC: U.S. Army Command, Special Operations Command.
    USCENTCOM: U.S. Central Command.
    USEUCOM: U.S. European Command.
    USJFCOM: U.S. Joint Forces Command.
    NORTHCOM: U.S. Northern Command.
    SOUTHCOM: U.S. Southern Command.
    USSOCOM: U.S. Special Operations Command.
    USSTRATCOM: U.S. Strategic Command.
    USTRANSCOM: U.S. Transportation Command.



  14. #14
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    Re: Military slang question

    So the radio call would be something like, "Chalk 4 is boots dry"...[/quote]
    Bravo 6 (who you are calling) 7 Zulu (would be you)"Boots on ground"7 Zulu out

    this from a military personal
    STA platoon



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    Re: Military slang question

    You left out "Wall-to-Wall Counselling" - meaning to deal with an idiot using "kinetic" means,

    and my personal favorite "Pounding my nuts flat" - Doing a stupid task, just because you were told to do it, to no apparent end.


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