Anyone from New York?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
  1. #1
    Pro
    Points: 103,347, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 5.0%
    Achievements:
    SocialVeteran50000 Experience Points
    Stumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ames
    Posts
    2,514
    Points
    103,347
    Level
    100
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 118
    Given: 5

    Anyone from New York?

    I just received an offer to spend the summer working at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, which is located in the Riverdale neighborhood of the Bronx in New York. I quickly accepted and am greatly looking forward to the position, because it should be a good opportunity professionally and personally as it will take me completely out of my element for the time I am there. Which leads me to the point of this post:

    As the sheltered Iowa native I am, I was hoping to get an early handle before I head out there in a few months. For residents or people that have spent extended time in the New York City area, do you have any tips or advice on items to bring, places to see, things to do? General words of wisdom for the small-town guy?

    Thanks!


    TRUE AND VALIANT

  2. #2
    Hall-Of-Famer
    Points: 81,379, Level: 88
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 571
    Overall activity: 4.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,819
    Points
    81,379
    Level
    88
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 17
    Given: 6

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    OK. I did not live in New York City, but briefly in that area. I visited occasionally for work and pleasure.

    So I will give it my best shot. Keep in mind that this was in the Dark Ages (i.e., pre-internet), and I am kind of a nerd. : ) I wish I could offer you more specifics, on specific venues to go, for example, but I have a pretty good general understanding of the area.

    Instead of putting everything in one big post, I will break this up a little. First a little about the people and some more practical matters. Then I will post about specific places in NYC you may want to go.

    Looking at the website for that college it looks pretty nice, a nice wooded area overlooking the Hudson. It isn’t what most people think of when they hear “the Bronx.”

    It looks like students are mostly from the local area, New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey. It can be difficult to meet people, but my experience is that people are generally more alike than different. New Yorkers can be a bit self-absorbed, believing that there is nowhere else better, but being from a small Iowa town will probably make you a bit unique and more interesting in that respect. I actually grew up on a farm. Unlike in urban Iowa, that can make you more interesting than saying you are from somewhere more pedestrian, say, like Des Moines, Omaha or suburban or upstate New York. Keep in mind that to New Yorkers the “sticks” start not far north of the city. Discussion about growing up on a farm or small town Iowa, that might be met with more of a snooty attitude in the great metropolises of our fair state, like Iowa City, is something New Yorkers are less accustomed to, something they may take a great interest in. This idyll is why so many move upstate or out of state. With many or most, you shouldn’t lack for something to talk about. If you are actually from Des Moines, scratch some of that. Just keep in might you don't have to be overly defensive about Iowa or Des Moines. They probably don't know a lot about Des Moines, either.

    New Yorkers are generally more standoffish, living with so many other people, but can be very friendly. Many or even most are from somewhere else originally. Whether it is fellow interns, students, or whatnot, its possible that you get to know one or some from the local area. This can help finding out where to go. You might even meet family members and be invited into their homes. New Yorkers can be very gracious. You may want to work some on talking fast and interrupting.

    If there are other interns like you, in from out of town, that can also be a lot of fun. You automatically have some constant and current mutual interests most likely – getting out and doing things.

    There is also a lot you can do on your own. Museums, for example. Shopping. Sight seeing. Or just walking.

    What to bring: comfortable shoes. Travel light. Keep in mind what you might better purchase once you are there.

    Things have probably changed some since I was there, but prices are obviously higher. As I recall, real estate prices is where the greatest differences were. Eating out can be expensive, I think, because even fast food workers have to pay rent. If available, you would probably want to make use of any cafeteria at school or your place of work. Clearly though you will want to eat out some (even a lot, limited by your finances).

    As I recall, grocery prices were higher than Iowa, but not that much, not as much as you might expect anyway and relative to real estate and eating out at least. Right in NYC they are probably higher. If you want to get out some (perhaps rent a car), you might try Stew Leonard’s in Norwalk or Danbury (and I see now, Yonkers) for something a little different:

    Fresh milk products and great customer service at Stew Leonard's!
    Our Policy
    Rule 1: The Customer is Always Right.
    Rule 2: If the Customer is Ever Wrong, Re-Read Rule 1.

    On clothing, things have probably changed a lot, but in my experience, prices were not any higher than Iowa, at least on sale, and you had a greater selection. If you watched for sales in fact I’d say clothing prices were lower. The Internet though has probably helped minimize or eliminate differences.

    FAO Schwartz used to have a big, popular toy store in Manhattan. I’m not sure it is even open now.

    Again, I will post again with more specifics about places to go in NYC, and more about the outlying area.

    Is NYC somewhere you might want to work after graduation?


    Last edited by Clone83; 02-07-2008 at 05:27 PM.

  3. #3
    Hall-Of-Famer
    Points: 81,379, Level: 88
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 571
    Overall activity: 4.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,819
    Points
    81,379
    Level
    88
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 17
    Given: 6

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Again, I wish I could be more specific about places to go, but I never went out (partied) a lot in NYC, and it has been quite awhile. But I am generally familiar with local sites and history.

    First, as you may know, there is a lot of history in a very small space on the southern tip of Manhattan. Wall Street was originally a wall protecting the city of New York, the Dutch, from Native Americans. The Federal Building there now is newer, not the same building, but there is a plaque on Wall Street commemorating where George Washington was sworn in as the first president. Besides the Stock Exchange, the former site of the WTC is nearby, as is Trinity Church and its cemetery, where Alexander Hamilton is buried. This is all within a couple blocks, a lot closer than you might imagine.

    The Statute of Liberty and Brooklyn Bridge are also close by. South Street Seaport is also worth a visit, and is a major tourist attraction.

    In midtown, besides the Empire State Building, you might consider a visit to the New York Public Library. I think it is second largest research library in the world (to only the Library of Congress). They have an excellent American History and Genealogy room if you are into that sort of thing. I didnít realize it until I lived there, but it turned out they had a lot of material on certain of my ancestors who were among the first settlers of New England. They also have all kinds of local histories, many, most, or maybe all, of say, city and counties in Iowa. If you have names, dates, and places (as I did for some of my Virginia-to-Ohio-to-Iowa ancestors), you might find certain published sources (e.g., brief biographies) that otherwise are difficult to obtain. You canít check material out, so I doubt that inter-library loan is available. The library in general I imagine has a lot about local NYC history.

    In Times Square, as I recall, is a place where you can buy theatre tickets for half-price during the day. I donít think you can miss it. It is pretty well known. You might as well also visit the U.N., if you are into that sort of thing.

    I never really went bar-hopping in NYC, so canít help out much in that respect. I like the jazz music of be-bop great Charlie Parker though, which one of the local stations plays two to three hours every morning drive time (FM, low number on the dial, as I recall). He used to play at a place called Birdland:

    Birdland, The Jazz Corner of the World!
    (Parker was originally from Kansas City)

    I wish now that I had checked out some local live music venues.

    There are a lot of museums, of course, mostly around midtown, many just off Central Park. I didnít actually go to any in NYC, and I guess I am not much of a museum kind of person to begin with. But I kind of wish that I had. My place in the 'country' was nice (bucolic, surrounded by woods). But going to a museum not only gets you out, but is something you might easily do on your own.

    I sometimes just checked something out, maybe a store or or two Central Park for example, and spent much of the day just walking, taking it in. I learned eventually that like people everywhere, those from outside Manhattan didnít necessarily visit much or check out all the local amenities. Even with my limited experience I learned that I might know my way around the city better than friends who had lived there all their lives. Some in the suburbs never make it in.

    In the Bronx, of course, I believe there is a zoo. And you might want to take in a Yankees game. I never did, but I did see a Knicks game at Madison Square Garden and the Jets at the Meadowlands (bleah).

    I plan to post more about upstate NY, just north of where you will be, and Connecticut. These are not necessarily hotbeds of tourism, like NYC or Boston, but there are reasons you may want to get out of the city some. It is a nice place to live. And there is a lot of history. Having lived before in downtown Chicago, in my experience, even with the big parks and the lake, the city got a bit tiring.



  4. #4
    Recruit
    Points: 7,029, Level: 24
    Level completed: 96%, Points required for next Level: 21
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran5000 Experience Points
    mojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Salem, NH
    Posts
    120
    Points
    7,029
    Level
    24
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    I'm on the east coast regularly as my family is all there my sister lived in midtown for sometime until recently when they moved to Nyack, my parent's live in Milford CT, which we won't talk about that. At any rate Don't listen to to Clone83!! Well at least considering Stew Leonards, that place is rediculous granted you can get some nice things there however unless you have A LOT of patience and time don't go there that place is ALWAYS crazy busy.

    Most of the things Clone83 said are pretty close i mean everyone knows the major sites to hit, but one tip i'll give you is take the subway the most if you want and/or need to take a cab, make sure you know where you're going ie.. don't get in the cab and be like "take me to the empire state building" say "W 33rd and 5th" If you say a landmark they'll jerk you around and drive some stupid path to get more money out of you, if you do use a taxi don't use the car services only use Yellow cabs the town cars charge you ridiculous fee's.

    Also if you want broadway tickets use TKTS for the best ticket prices. They have two locations if i remember right one is on broadway the other is near wall st.

    Stay out of Central Park at night

    The Bronx zoo is a must!

    Bar suggestions check out The Joshua Tree or Pravda or Slate if you like to play pool.

    Food is overall comparable to Iowa, just more selection, a steak is more expensive out there versus lobster though, where as here its the opposite. but you can get a good food for good prices just ask!

    Entertainment is the biggest expense! be prepared drinking is not cheap expect 10 - 12 bucks for a single mixed drink at least. Some clubs will make you purchase an entire bottle in order to get in but that's also Manhattan prices. It's proably a bit cheaper in the Bronx.

    Oh yeah Brooklyn and Queens are pretty decent places also to check out and Harlem has gotten alot better definitley should check out the Apollo Theater.


    Last edited by mojo; 02-07-2008 at 07:59 PM.

  5. #5
    Pro
    Points: 32,417, Level: 55
    Level completed: 43%, Points required for next Level: 633
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran25000 Experience Points
    ISUclones33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,247
    Points
    32,417
    Level
    55
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    if you see someone get shot.. keep walking.
    Dont go to china town
    check out south side sea port.
    mind your own on the sidewalks and everyone else will aswell
    dont look or act like a tourist




    :)


    Last edited by HILLCYD; 02-07-2008 at 09:46 PM.

  6. #6
    Pro
    Points: 103,347, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 5.0%
    Achievements:
    SocialVeteran50000 Experience Points
    Stumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ames
    Posts
    2,514
    Points
    103,347
    Level
    100
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 118
    Given: 5

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Quote Originally Posted by Clone83 View Post
    Is NYC somewhere you might want to work after graduation?
    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I'm planning on attending graduate school at Ohio University following graduation in May. I really can't see myself as a big city person although I enjoy visiting places like Chicago every once in awhile. I also see myself as more of a West Coast than an East Coast kind of person - I'd love to end up in British Columbia or the northwest US although that's a couple years down the road. However, that's one of the main things that drew my to the internship in NYC; I figured it very well might be my one chance to experience living in a big city and in the eastern US to see how I like it.

    Again, thanks for sharing your advice and experience with me!


    TRUE AND VALIANT

  7. #7
    Hall-Of-Famer
    Points: 81,379, Level: 88
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 571
    Overall activity: 4.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,819
    Points
    81,379
    Level
    88
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 17
    Given: 6

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Quote Originally Posted by mojo View Post
    . . . At any rate Don't listen to to Clone83!! Well at least considering Stew Leonards, that place is rediculous granted you can get some nice things there however unless you have A LOT of patience and time don't go there that place is ALWAYS crazy busy. . .
    Whatever.

    I only went to their store in Norwalk a couple of times, the original one. Although it was pretty busy you moved right along, the way they had it laid out, so it didn't take long the times I went. As their site says, they have more sales per square foot than any other. And it is a little like Disneyland, and since they are processing milk, like the dairy at the Iowa State Fair (without the cows). The company is cited in marketing text books. Some prices are available at that site.

    I agree about the subway (or even walking if not far).

    That's some good advice, mojo.

    And since you are so much more knowledgeable, maybe you could be so kind as to post about places on the Hudson, in the Catskills, or Connecticut if Stumpy were interested and asked. Since he doesn't plan to work there I am not going to go into great detail here. But I will have a couple of more comments.



  8. #8
    Hall-Of-Famer
    Points: 81,379, Level: 88
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 571
    Overall activity: 4.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,819
    Points
    81,379
    Level
    88
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 17
    Given: 6

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Incidentally, PBS had a good history series on New York a few years ago:
    New York: A Documentary Film Online

    And just this week they had a show about Grand Central Station:
    Grand Central | American Experience | PBS

    I happened to be waiting to meet a client by that clock the moment Desert Storm broke out, at the same time one of my high school buddies was over Baghdad.



  9. #9
    Speechless
    Points: 495,725, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 37.0%
    Achievements:
    SocialVeteran50000 Experience Points
    jdoggivjc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sterling Heights, MI
    Posts
    33,377
    Points
    495,725
    Level
    100
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 1,330
    Given: 928

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Being originally from Long Island, I really can't give you much solid advice on New York City as they pretty much treat us Islanders like tourists as well. Then again, most that live on Long Island don't exactly frequent the city either unless they work there.

    There isn't a whole lot to do out on Long Island (as the island's mostly taken up by residential, commercial, light rail and expressways), but if you ever get the chance check out Fire Island and Jones Beach on the South Shore. I'd say it's one of the best beaches in New York, plus there's a lot of historical info there. Also, if you're into lighthouses, as you get further east there's a pretty sweet one on Fire Island just south of Bablylon/Bay Shore. If you're into water parks, there's a pretty decent one in Riverhead, although considering you're living in the Bronx that's going to be at least 75 miles away (the complete opposite end of the Long Island Expressway), and considering it's New York that could be a 2 hour trip or longer, so you'll have to gage just how much that interests you. I know this isn't New York, but if you're into amusement parks there's a Six Flags on Exit 16 of the New Jersey Turnpike.

    And as far as New Yorkers considering north of the city as "the sticks," my aunt refuses to acknowledge that there's a world that actually exists beyond the Hudson River...


    Chuck Lidell: I paint my toenails with pink and black polish. Problem is, I get more paint on my toes and on the carpet than on my nails. Any advice?
    Maria Sharapova: Don't you beat up other guys for a living? I don't know how to answer this.


  10. #10
    Hall-Of-Famer
    Points: 57,251, Level: 74
    Level completed: 14%, Points required for next Level: 1,299
    Overall activity: 13.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points
    pulse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,817
    Points
    57,251
    Level
    74
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 78
    Given: 77

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpy View Post
    I just received an offer to spend the summer working at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, which is located in the Riverdale neighborhood of the Bronx in New York. I quickly accepted and am greatly looking forward to the position, because it should be a good opportunity professionally and personally as it will take me completely out of my element for the time I am there. Which leads me to the point of this post:

    As the sheltered Iowa native I am, I was hoping to get an early handle before I head out there in a few months. For residents or people that have spent extended time in the New York City area, do you have any tips or advice on items to bring, places to see, things to do? General words of wisdom for the small-town guy?

    Thanks!
    Make friends from people with the area and go out in the city. City (Manahatten) is great, the Bronx... not so much.



  11. #11
    Walk On
    Points: 6,795, Level: 24
    Level completed: 49%, Points required for next Level: 255
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran5000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    QC
    Posts
    143
    Points
    6,795
    Level
    24
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    If you can, take a day trip up to West Point. There is a train that will take you to the area and than a ferry to the campus area. It is full of history. You can find resturants that aren't bad for reasonable prices. You can easily spend more on drinks than food. Go to Ellis Island and check out the computer logs of all the immigrants. Make sure you have one a the assistants tell you about the logs you will find on family members. It is very interesting to have them interpret the codes.



  12. #12
    All-Star
    Points: 15,850, Level: 38
    Level completed: 25%, Points required for next Level: 600
    Overall activity: 1.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran10000 Experience Points
    shildreth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,150
    Points
    15,850
    Level
    38
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 1
    Given: 33

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    I currently am on an assignment for a couple of years in Stamford, CT. The best advice is pack light. Space is an issue and price for what you can afford in Iowa vs NY is ridiculous. Get a subway map and train tickets and make them be your best friend. They can get you anywhere and are reasonably priced. You can drive but parking is more of the concern, limited areas to park so price is very expensive. Plus you don't have to deal with the very agressive drivers.

    Since you will be in the bronx you have to see Yankee stadium. I am a mets fan but I recommend doing the Yankee tour. Very neat. Also it is the last year in Shea stadium for the mets before they open the new stadium next year.

    Basically no matter whre you go in greater NYC area there is something to see. Lots of history and character. I have been here just over a year and still haven't cracked the surface of all I can see. Something new every weekend. Plus you are so close to other areas (Boston, Philly, DC etc) it makes for a good weekend getaway.


    '00 Grad
    "Can I borrow your towel, my car just hit a water buffalo" Erwin Fletcher

  13. #13
    Hall-Of-Famer
    Points: 81,379, Level: 88
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 571
    Overall activity: 4.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,819
    Points
    81,379
    Level
    88
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 17
    Given: 6

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    There is a lot of good advice above. Thanks, everyone.

    Stumpy, you will find out a lot more what you want to do once you are there, obviously.

    Yes, you will want to get to know everywhere you can go by subway and by train. You may even want to make a point of using it a lot right away, so you know your way around from the start. I don’t think you will want to drive in Manhattan at all.

    Without even looking at Google maps, I don’t think you will have any problem driving to where you are staying, if you drove. I’ve driven through the Bronx a few times on the freeways. You would want to be concerned some about getting off into a bad neighborhood, especially at night, but I cannot help you much there. And be concerned about making the proper turn, or being in the proper lane. : ) If you ever fly, any airport would do, but in case you wondered the small one in White Plains is decent.

    If you drive out of town, keep in mind the time of day, what direction the traffic is going. On I-95 to Connecticut, for example, you would not want to leave New York at the end of the workday (Friday especially). Traffic can be stop and go, especially when there is an accident (when it is actually more stop). Time things to go in the opposite direction of traffic if possible. I drove in traffic a lot, and even when going well, there was a definite surge. Being 10 minutes late out of the house could mean an extra 10 or 20 minutes drive time.

    Thanks to jdoggivjc for posting about Long Island and New Jersey. I never visited the beach there but Long Island and the Jersey shore are the best places to see the ocean. Long Island Sound is nice, very nice, but it isn’t quite the same. From Connecticut you can see Long Island in the distance.

    Below are links to some places outside NYC, by no means exclusive, just some I know about:

    FDR Presidential Library and Museum, Hyde Park, NY
    Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

    I drove by once. It looked very nice, like the entire Hudson Valley but even more so. Had they had the special Cyclone wing then, honoring Uncle Henry, maybe I would have stopped.

    Foundation for Economic Education, Irvington-on-Hudson, NY
    Seminars | Foundation for Economic Education

    I didn’t even know about this when I lived there. On the off-chance you would be interested, a free-market educational foundation is just north of where you will be, in Washington Irving’s hometown.

    If you ever hear thunder in the Catskills, you can find some guys having a kegger and bowling. But you will have to delay grad school awhile.

    Toad’s Place, New Haven, CT
    Toad's Place...where the legends play!

    Excellent live music, basically right on the Yale campus.

    Mystic Seaport, Mystic, CT
    Mystic Seaport: The Museum of America and the Sea™ : Home

    Learn a lot about old New England. Nearby New London was a big whaling town.

    Block Island, Block Island, RI
    Block Island Homepage

    Big summer resort off the Connecticut/Rhode Island coast at the eastern end of Long Island. A buddy of mine used to vacation there.

    Newport Jazz Festival, Newport, RI
    Jazz At Newport 2008 - Jazz at Newport

    Probably held too late in the year for you, but big time. Another friend used to go.

    NYC water (boat) tour
    Touristy of course, but I’ve heard the sight seeing trips around Manhattan are actually pretty good. I never did it in New York, but the one in Chicago was well worth it.

    Also, it was mentioned above, but you may want to go to West Point before or instead of everything else outside NYC. I didn’t visit, but having driven that way, I know it is scenic. The Tappan Zee is where the river gets wider, where Henry Hudson and his crew thought they had found the Northwest Passage. On a later expedition in what is now Hudson Bay, in the middle of winter, some of his men, fearful of losing their own lives if they didn’t get out, mutinied and cut Hudson and the few loyal to him loose. Hudson and the others were never heard from again. During the Revolutionary War, I believe the American patriots dragged a chain across at West Point, where the river is more narrow, to keep British ships from sailing up.


    Last edited by Clone83; 02-09-2008 at 04:20 PM.

  14. #14
    Hall-Of-Famer
    Points: 81,379, Level: 88
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 571
    Overall activity: 4.0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran50000 Experience Points

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,819
    Points
    81,379
    Level
    88
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 17
    Given: 6

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpy View Post
    Thanks for all of the suggestions. I'm planning on attending graduate school at Ohio University following graduation in May. I really can't see myself as a big city person although I enjoy visiting places like Chicago every once in awhile. I also see myself as more of a West Coast than an East Coast kind of person - I'd love to end up in British Columbia or the northwest US although that's a couple years down the road. However, that's one of the main things that drew my to the internship in NYC; I figured it very well might be my one chance to experience living in a big city and in the eastern US to see how I like it.

    Again, thanks for sharing your advice and experience with me!
    Youíre welcome.

    And wow. I was looking around the web. It is amazing all the information available at your fingertips today compared to before. I was going to post what my biggest impressions about NYC were from my first few hours there, how the reality compared to what I expected, but on second thought, I donít want to in a way Ďspoilí your experience (and this is in no way negative). I would only add that New Yorkers are often considered rude, but I myself came to appreciate the transparency, cutting through the bull and saying what you think. A real time saver. And most are also very hard workers, much more so than Iowans appreciate. You might make new friends quickly, among your closest associates.

    You may not want to visit anywhere else, as you are not going to be there that long. You will obviously be near other cities, and you know best whether this is something you would want to do, and whether you will have opportunities later. Ohio is closer still than Iowa.

    For the same reason you may not visit other cities, if you leave New York at all, Iím not sure you would want or need to go all that far. A longer trip would take more time and gas is expensive. All the (fine) scenery can start to look a lot alike. I like the open road, but there is a lot immediately north of where you will along the Hudson, in a small amount of space. And the scenery is great. I never really day hiked (seriously) or camped in the area, but I traveled some to Liberty, New York, on business, close to where Woodstock was held (Bethel). Stay away from the yellow pills.

    On the rail lines, I would add that the Metro North commuter line between New Haven and New York is a piece of cake. The city of New Haven has seen better days, and you would certainly want to be careful at night, but the Yale campus is awesome. Some buddies attended Fairfield University, which used to be a large, private estate overlooking the Sound. If youíve seen the movie Trading Places, the wealthy brothersí home is the administration building there. We played touch football on the yard on weekends a couple times there. My friends lived in a beach house when they were students.

    If you search Greens Farms, CT in Google maps you can see the area I lived for awhile, which is a part of Westport. My landlord helped build many of the homes there, and saw it go from mostly woods to the way it is today. The open space you see (in Satellite view) by the arrow is where someone keeps a cow, sheep, and goats, and bales hay, highly unusual for that entire county (though Iíve seen horse stables elsewhere). Not far would be a plaque commemorating where the Greens Farms Meeting House used to be. It notes that George Washington stopped there on his way to fight the British in Boston (not unusual for the area), and includes some history about John Green. I used to run along the beach west of Beachside Avenue (off Burying Hill Road, not that state park beach to the west), then east along the road and beach again into Southport (small town there visible in Southport Harbor, across from Fairfield Country Club). Those (gated) estates on Beachside Avenue used to be (and probably still are) some of the nicest anywhere. Before living there, I had heard of people commuting 2 or 3 hours a day, and I thought they were nuts. But I was wrong. With modern technology, riding the train is not as isolated as before (I considered isolated a plus). But you can still get a lot of work done. Or read the paper. Or sleep. You can see the Metro stops in Google (both Greens Farms and Southport), where there is a place to park your car. Quiet. Woods. Sea breeze. Sound waves. Seagulls. . . .

    Anyway, I could go on and on. : )

    Feel free to post again or let me know if you have more questions. Best of luck!



  15. #15
    Bench Warmer
    Points: 15,261, Level: 37
    Level completed: 52%, Points required for next Level: 389
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    Veteran10000 Experience Points
    cyclonelifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Beatrice, Nebraska
    Posts
    346
    Points
    15,261
    Level
    37
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 1
    Given: 0

    Re: Anyone from New York?

    Born and raised in the area and last year went back "home" for the first time in over 20 years. Growing up NYC had a "tough no BS" attitude. After 9/11 things changed - people changed. It was a very friendly place.

    Some things I did that I never did before was head down to the furthest south point, by the Statue of Liberty. Don't have to go out to the Island but the area is awesome. From there WALK up to Ground Zero. A lot to check-out in that area and it's hard to describe, there is a "silence" all around it. Don't here cars honking or people working - very somber.

    From there continue your walk to the north and east and hit Wall St. A lot of historic buildings in the area. Than get on a subway and get up to 42nd St. Growing up that was hooker haven, today it is a very classy part of town.

    The Bronx Zoo is a great suggestion, but plan that as your only event for the day.

    I was also going to suggest Long Island or if you want to see how people live in the 'burbs - get on the Jersey Turnpike and head south to Seaside Heights. A great boardwalk - a great time. And in the summer time a lot more to see besides the ocean.

    The main expressway up north (either Kennedy or Roosevelt) will take you to the George Washington Bridge - go over to Jersey and see the skyline of NY and in Alpine, NJ is a great park filled with the history of George Washington with the Revolutionary War.

    This is the year to be in NYC if your a sports fan. This is the last season for Yankee Stadium. Try and catch a game. All that history in one park and its a beautiful stadium. Games can get over late so try and catch a Saturday afternoon game.

    Concerts? Start checking out what's happening at Madison Square Garden - the mecca for great concerts. Saw Jethro Tull there in the 70s, a great place to watch a concert.

    I'm not sure exactly where you are going to be, but if you don't need your own personal car - don't take it. There is mass transportation everywhere. Not only getting around in a car difficult but finding a parking place can be a major challenge and quite expensive.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • TV: Mediacom 22
  • HOOPS: Iowa State vs. Drake
  • December 20, 2014
  • 04:00 PM