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  1. #61
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by 3TrueFans View Post
    Disagreements over something someone said that was possibly taken wrong? That's still not that shocking.
    Leading to parental fight a youth FB game? Well, I guess you are right...parental fights at youth sporting events aren't particularly shocking anymore either, whether they are over the use of the n-word or something else just as silly...


    "Don't worry Boss...they can't do nothin' 'til they're through sparklin'..."

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  2. #62
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by jbhtexas View Post
    I'd say it's ridiculous when two people from the same community and race, and of similar age and background get into fights because they can't determine whether the use of a word in common conversation is derogatory or not.
    Not at all. For example, queer was reappopriated by the LGBT (etc, etc, etc) community to make it more positive, but some use it and some refuse to because of it's history. Cracker is maybe another example, but I've really only seen that brought up to further some reverse racism argument, so I'm not really sure there are many white people that actually think it's derogatory, or if they're just using it to make an argument.



  3. #63
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by fsanford View Post
    This is dead on. Certain words, in society have double meaning, depending on the situation.
    In this case the boundaries are pretty clear, if you are using the word in question addressing somebody you do not know, you probably are looking to degrade and humiliate.

    The guys was upset, felt he was above following the rules, did not want to physically assault the guy, so resorted to the worst thing he could think of verbally.
    But my argument is that when a white person uses it there is no proper context. Now I get it completely, what Cooper said was bad. That was about as bad as you can use that word. But to suggest it would be a whole different thing if I started replacing "friend" with the "a" version is flat wrong. Or what if a white rapper used the word extensively in the same way a black rapper would. Do you think that would be well received?



  4. #64
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    Ok, so then the outrage is about his statement that he is going to beat up every person of a certain ethnicity. Are we made he used the word, or are we mad about the threats? Because I stand by my point that it is unfair to use the word in a completely colloquial manner, but then to feign outrage when someone else uses. But yes, word or no word, it is unacceptable to threaten to beat up people because of their race.
    You are totally oversimplifying the context when you say they are both simply used in a "colloquial" manner.



  5. #65
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    Ok, so then the outrage is about his statement that he is going to beat up every person of a certain ethnicity. Are we made he used the word, or are we mad about the threats? Because I stand by my point that it is unfair to use the word in a completely colloquial manner, but then to feign outrage when someone else uses. But yes, word or no word, it is unacceptable to threaten to beat up people because of their race.
    It's the same idea as if you were with your best buds and called one of them an a-hole, maybe during a wild game of Mario Kart Jeff shoots you with a blue shell on the last lap and you say "you are such an a-hole!" in a mostly joking but kind of really wanting to kill Jeff way. If you go up to a security guard somewhere and call him an a-hole he will probably take offense to it.

    The difference being saying a-hole in a negative way to someone doesn't have the bonus effect of labeling you as anything other than maybe an a-hole yourself, it certainly doesn't flag you as a racist or anything like that. Now if you go around calling people n-words that's probably not the case, that's just the way it is because the word has a long standing history of being associated with racists and racism.



  6. #66
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    But my argument is that when a white person uses it there is no proper context. Now I get it completely, what Cooper said was bad. That was about as bad as you can use that word. But to suggest it would be a whole different thing if I started replacing "friend" with the "a" version is flat wrong. Or what if a white rapper used the word extensively in the same way a black rapper would. Do you think that would be well received?
    Eminem had a song titled N****a!



  7. #67
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by 3TrueFans View Post
    It's the same idea as if you were with your best buds and called one of them an a-hole, maybe during a wild game of Mario Kart Jeff shoots you with a blue shell on the last lap and you say "you are such an a-hole!" in a mostly joking but kind of really wanting to kill Jeff way. If you go up to a security guard somewhere and call him an a-hole he will probably take offense to it.

    The difference being saying a-hole in a negative way to someone doesn't have the bonus effect of labeling you as anything other than maybe an a-hole yourself, it certainly doesn't flag you as a racist or anything like that. Now if you go around calling people n-words that's probably not the case, that's just the way it is because the word has a long standing history of being associated with racists and racism.
    If it was news to him that it is going to be trouble if he uses that word in that way, then he has other problems also.



  8. #68
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Cycsk View Post
    If it was news to him that it is going to be trouble if he uses that word in that way, then he has other problems also.
    I'm sure he knew, you can't live in this country and not know, he obviously got caught up in the moment and didn't realize or care that there was a camera in his face. Which is why this is probably not as big of a deal as it seems it is going to be, unless the Eagles know something we don't.



  9. #69
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    N.W.A.'s Straight Outta Compton was released in 1988, right around the time Mr. Cooper would've been in diapers. They put a 'z' on it. Chappelle's Show was at it zenith at same time Cooper arrived in college. Guys in his generation have grown up in a world where the N-word seems to have lost some of its bite. For those under, say, 25....I'm curious if this is really that big a deal any more? I've always viewed it along the same lines as folks who can't carry on a conversation without a flurry of curse words - it just makes them look unintelligent. Dumb is a hard rap to shake.

    If Mr Cooper catches touchdowns this year the media will get a "redemption story" second wind out of this. If he drops everything thrown to him they'll paint him as John Rocker II, and get a second wind out of this. ESPN, NBC, FoxSports...they all get to run more beer commercials. Commercials that rarely feature women frolicking in skimpy bikinis anymore. It doesn't feel like you win much without the bikini babes. But it does reminded you that your beer supply may be running low. I checked. It is.

    So, thank you Mr. Cooper for reminding me that I need to buy more beer.



  10. #70
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by 247cy View Post
    N.W.A.'s Straight Outta Compton was released in 1988, right around the time Mr. Cooper would've been in diapers. They put a 'z' on it. Chappelle's Show was at it zenith at same time Cooper arrived in college. Guys in his generation have grown up in a world where the N-word seems to have lost some of its bite. For those under, say, 25....I'm curious if this is really that big a deal any more? I've always viewed it along the same lines as folks who can't carry on a conversation without a flurry of curse words - it just makes them look unintelligent. Dumb is a hard rap to shake.

    If Mr Cooper catches touchdowns this year the media will get a "redemption story" second wind out of this. If he drops everything thrown to him they'll paint him as John Rocker II, and get a second wind out of this. ESPN, NBC, FoxSports...they all get to run more beer commercials. Commercials that rarely feature women frolicking in skimpy bikinis anymore. It doesn't feel like you win much without the bikini babes. But it does reminded you that your beer supply may be running low. I checked. It is.

    So, thank you Mr. Cooper for reminding me that I need to buy more beer.
    I really enjoyed this post.



  11. #71
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    But my argument is that when a white person uses it there is no proper context. Now I get it completely, what Cooper said was bad. That was about as bad as you can use that word. But to suggest it would be a whole different thing if I started replacing "friend" with the "a" version is flat wrong. Or what if a white rapper used the word extensively in the same way a black rapper would. Do you think that would be well received?
    You can't argue that there were a lot of white people that tried to maintain dominance over black people for a long, long, time after slavery ended through active things like violence and segregation, and to a lesser degree, passive things like derogatory terms. Things have clearly gotten better, but the Civil Rights Act was still only 50 years ago. Riley saying things like this just brings up the history of white people trying to maintain dominance over blacks, and while Riley probably didn't know exactly why he was using the word, that is how it comes off in my opinion. He sounded like he was still trying to hold onto that old idea that blacks are lesser than whites. Whether he meant it or not, that is how he came off to a lot of people.


    Last edited by Doc; 08-02-2013 at 02:52 PM.

  12. #72
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    You can't argue that there were a lot of white people that tried to maintain dominance over black people for a long, long, time after slavery ended through active things like violence and segregation, and to a lesser degree, passive things like derogatory terms. Things have clearly gotten better, but the Civil Rights Act was still only 50 years ago. Riley saying things like this just brings up the history of white people trying to maintain dominance over blacks, and while Riley probably didn't know exactly why he was using the word, that is how it comes off in my opinion. He sounded like he was still trying to hold onto that old idea that blacks are lesser than whites. Whether he meant it or not, that is how he came off, and I'm confident that I am not the only person that feels that way.
    And again there is a distinction I am making. I said back in my first post on this topic that what Riley said is ugly because it is demonstrative of the usage of the word that made it the awful, untouchable word it is today. He used it the same way someone was using it in the 1920s, and that's bad.

    What I'm saying is I can't understand the "that's our word and you can't use it" mentality. If it is an awful, unspeakable term that reminds us of a dark time in history, then don't say it. To me, it is that simple. But if you are going to use it in your day-to-day vocabulary, and if you are going to use it in a very colloquial matter, then don't act outraged if others use it in the same fashion (but, again, I don't think that Cooper used it in that fashion). Which gets me back to my question, are people mad because he used the word, or are they made at how he used the word?



  13. #73
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Brad4Cyclones View Post
    Players always try and hit you hard in the NFL. If they try a cheap shot, fine, they will just receive a fine.
    Of course, and good point. But concussions still are no fun, even if the hitter gets fined.



  14. #74
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    And again there is a distinction I am making. I said back in my first post on this topic that what Riley said is ugly because it is demonstrative of the usage of the word that made it the awful, untouchable word it is today. He used it the same way someone was using it in the 1920s, and that's bad.

    What I'm saying is I can't understand the "that's our word and you can't use it" mentality. If it is an awful, unspeakable term that reminds us of a dark time in history, then don't say it. To me, it is that simple. But if you are going to use it in your day-to-day vocabulary, and if you are going to use it in a very colloquial matter, then don't act outraged if others use it in the same fashion (but, again, I don't think that Cooper used it in that fashion). Which gets me back to my question, are people mad because he used the word, or are they made at how he used the word?
    Ok, I get what you're saying. I was just hopping back on to add something. But if you don't think Cooper used it colloquially, what are we even arguing about?



  15. #75
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    As someone raised in the South, I can attest that there are still a lot of scars from the Civil Rights movement and beyond. Black Men and Women that are approaching retirement age were Cooper's age during the middle of the movement. Churches were bombed, firehoses and dogs were unleashed, and I think families have a hard time forgetting that.

    Sadly, to not get angry at a white man's use of the word could have a black man labeled as an "Uncle Tom". People like Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson make a living as radicals that insinuate and perpetuate unecessary drama. Black youth are put under a lot of pressure to uphold racial pride, and the expression of this can be mislabled as sterotypes by other groups. I think this generation really wants to move on, but there are some that just wont let it go.

    What's most troubling to me is that Black people have taken up a "light skin" v "dark skin" rivalry on social media and other outlets. How does anyone expect society to move forward when a fissure, although minor, like this happens? Either all races can drop it, or we can keep shooting ourselves in the foot and racism will continue. It can't be had both ways.


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