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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by CyKosys View Post
    A Black US Congressman from New York whose list of ethics "no-no's" is as long as the Brooklyn Bridge.
    Are you carrying on a conversation with yourself?



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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by 3TrueFans View Post
    Are you carrying on a conversation with yourself?

    Don't stop him, it's kind of entertaining.



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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by 3TrueFans View Post
    Are you carrying on a conversation with yourself?
    El oh el.

    My thoughts exactly.



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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    I can't decide where I come down on this. On one hand, I would imagine that "word" has become a part of the lexicon in an NFL locker room. I'm sure its used to the point where people become desensitized to its "meaning" and it has become colloquial. I know that race scholars wouldn't agree with me, but it seems a bit ridiculous to use the word as casually as many African American people do, and then to be so outraged when a white person uses it, but who am I to judge.

    On the other hand, the way in which he used the word was ugly. This wasn't used in a colloquial fashion. Saying he will "fight every _______ here" is ugly and it is demonstrative of the usage of word that gives it the nasty connotation it has today.



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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    I can't decide where I come down on this. On one hand, I would imagine that "word" has become a part of the lexicon in an NFL locker room. I'm sure its used to the point where people become desensitized to its "meaning" and it has become colloquial. I know that race scholars wouldn't agree with me, but it seems a bit ridiculous to use the word as casually as many African American people do, and then to be so outraged when a white person uses it, but who am I to judge.

    On the other hand, the way in which he used the word was ugly. This wasn't used in a colloquial fashion. Saying he will "fight every _______ here" is ugly and it is demonstrative of the usage of word that gives it the nasty connotation it has today.
    I agree 100%. It comes off as contrived anger. Like someone is looking for excuse to get riled up and overreact.

    If you hate the word, don't use it. Don't use it. Ever.

    I agree that Cooper's context was really bad, and he's probably a huge tool, but putting a bounty on him and blacklisting him seems like an overreaction.


    Last edited by Al_4_State; 08-02-2013 at 02:22 PM.
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by tim_redd View Post
    I think Cooper is a piece of trash, but that "word" is heard probably hundreds of times a week in the locker room between the music being played and the players themselves saying it.
    Not the same thing. Cooper used the hard R version. Different context, totally different meaning.


    While on live TV, Ford used a vulgar term to describe a private part of the female anatomy, adding that he was “happily married” and “got more than enough to eat at home.”

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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Architect View Post
    Not the same thing. Cooper used the hard R version. Different context, totally different meaning.
    The "hard r version" is used in music too....



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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    I know that race scholars wouldn't agree with me, but it seems a bit ridiculous to use the word as casually as many African American people do, and then to be so outraged when a white person uses it, but who am I to judge.
    Exactly. And it goes way beyond the NFL locker room. In certain lexicons today, a girl/young woman is commonly referred to as a "B****", and a boy/young man is commonly referred to as a "N*****". Those terms are applied to both people that are liked and disliked.

    It becomes very challenging in the workplace...those words are flying around the lunchroom...some are offended at what appears to be ordinary language for others. As a manager, what do you do? Are those terms derogatory in today's lexicon or not? I guess in some circles the answer would be "yes", and in other circles, the answer would be "no"???

    Quote Originally Posted by Clonefan32 View Post
    On the other hand, the way in which he used the word was ugly. This wasn't used in a colloquial fashion. Saying he will "fight every _______ here" is ugly and it is demonstrative of the usage of word that gives it the nasty connotation it has today.
    I can also agree with this. However, if Cooper converses in an environment where the term is no longer derogatory, and maybe even "cool" to use, or used for shock value, it's hard to know what his motive was when using the term.


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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Architect View Post
    Not the same thing. Cooper used the hard R version. Different context, totally different meaning.
    That's cute.

    Mike Vick kills dogs. McCoy welcomes him with open arms. Cooper says a word McCoy has probably said 1,000 times....and McCoy no longer considers him a friend.

    Cooper looks really bad for saying it and should have some backlash but this much?



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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by jbhtexas View Post
    I can also agree with this. However, if Cooper converses in an environment where the term is no longer derogatory, and maybe even "cool" to use, or used for shock value, it's hard to know what his motive was when using the term.
    I get your point but that's absolutely not the case here. He was wasted and belligerent and used the hard R version in a very negative context.


    While on live TV, Ford used a vulgar term to describe a private part of the female anatomy, adding that he was “happily married” and “got more than enough to eat at home.”

  11. #26
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Architect View Post
    Not the same thing. Cooper used the hard R version. Different context, totally different meaning.
    If had been a soft "r", he would have still been crucified due to his pigment deficiency.

    Its a double standard, and a ridiculous one. If it is offensive, its right out. Period.


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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    It doesn't seem to me that you should take one thing said in an emotional situation by someone who has been drinking to be the sum total of his beliefs about racism. I would hope that there is plenty more evidence to consider. Granted, this may be a glimpse into something that is in there, but getting drunk isn't necessarily "truth serum." Sometimes, being drunk causes one to imitate familiar things, such as other athletes hammering on each other in the locker room. I don't know what happened in this situation, but I would hope that this statement given under these circumstances could be considered in the entire context of his character and relationships.

    Clearly, if someone uses the N-word, they are going to have to be prepared for fallout. the author of the response article says that he wants to ban the use of the word. That doesn't seem realistic or likely. My prediction is that some white artists (or Asian or Hispanic) are going to start using it prominently and we will be forced to get past the simple racial lines for using the word, so that context and relationship determine its meaning. I know plenty of white people who can't even seem to say the word "black" or "African-American" without it dripping with racism. The racism can't simply be associated with the words we use or don't use. The words are relevant, but context of relationship and other evidence of character are more important. In this case, if there is substantial racism, we should expect it to be uncovered. If this is the only evidence, then let's not necessarily make more out of this instance than it deserves.



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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Well this is new - now it depends on which version of the 'n' word is used along with the race of the person using it? 'ga' versus 'ger'? Can other brown-skinned people use it, like Asians or Indians?

    Better question - do you people listen to yourselves? I'm really amused by the whole spectacle. Anyone trying to justify any use of the word by any race is perpetuating the very issue they claim to be sensitive toward. Hypocrisy, indeed.



  14. #29
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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    I don't think that alcohol releases the deep seeded feelings that dwell in your heart, but I have no doubt that it breaks down your ability to filter that first thing to pop into your mind.


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    Re: Philly WR Cooper racial slur and McCoy's reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Al_4_State View Post
    If had been a soft "r", he would have still been crucified due to his pigment deficiency.
    Crucified by some, but I guarantee you his peers would let be much more forgiving.


    While on live TV, Ford used a vulgar term to describe a private part of the female anatomy, adding that he was “happily married” and “got more than enough to eat at home.”

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