Seizures in dogs - Page 3
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  1. #31
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by isudoc03 View Post
    That's good the bloodwork is ok. I probably would have started her on phenobarbital now but that is just a difference in opinion. How old is your dog?
    She's about 4



  2. #32
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by ISUCubswin View Post
    Our dog took pills but started acting VERY differently so was taken off the pills. After, the seizures were much worse and we had to put her down. She was only 10 months.
    Sorry to hear. Was it the same drugs (phenylbarb... whatever) others have mentioned?

    Quote Originally Posted by bugs4cy View Post
    In 05 our 10ish yr old (came from a pound so didn't know exact age) German shepherd started seizing. The vet said she might just have one ... Or if she kept having them they'd get longer and more intense. The later happened. Her recovery time stretch from a few minutes to a day. She lost control of her bowels as the seizure drug on. She got to the point where she did not recover, as she did it appear to recognize us and was constantly agitated. It still brings tears to my eyes, thinking about those last days and then having to put her down. We were never told that medication might exist. From the first seizure to the end was maybe 6 weeks. Her seizures were not brought on by overexcitement. She was sleeping beside me when the first seizure occurred.

    I wish you Godspeed as you deal with this, but based on those with information on how they've been able to manage this, there might be hope.
    Sorry to hear about your dog. My vet did say the seizures could get longer and more intense. I can't imagine them being any worse.



  3. #33
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by 1100011CS View Post
    Also, she is very confused and unstable when she finally comes out of it. The first time she actually growled at me and started running away from me toward my kids. That was really scary. Is there anything we should do during or directly after the seizures?
    I've seen my buddy's dog do this. That's probably more from being temporarily blinded and confused. I've seen his dog come out of it twice, and both times she was disoriented and unsure of her surroundings for about 10 minutes. The weird thing is how quickly they go back to normal, like in 20 minutes. If that stuff happened to me I'd be out of commision for two days.



  4. #34
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by 1100011CS View Post
    She's about 4
    At that age she most likely has something called idiopathic epilepsy. Which basically means she has seizures but no cause for them can be found. Older dogs having seizures are more likely to have a brain tumor. Idiopathic epilepsy can usually be managed with medication(s).

    This website has some more info.

    01 Seizure Disorders - VeterinaryPartner.com - a VIN company!



  5. #35
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by isudoc03 View Post
    At that age she most likely has something called idiopathic epilepsy. Which basically means she has seizures but no cause for them can be found. Older dogs having seizures are more likely to have a brain tumor. Idiopathic epilepsy can usually be managed with medication(s).

    This website has some more info.

    01 Seizure Disorders - VeterinaryPartner.com - a VIN company!
    Good info. Thanks a million!



  6. #36
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    My border collie had seizures from time to time and it progressively got worse. Then her pupils completely dilated and she went blind. Spent almost a year and a couple thousand dollars getting down to the bottom of it. Turned out she had a very rare disorder where her system wasn't processing cholesterol properly and it was crystalizing in different areas of her body. The cholesterol crystals destroyed her retinas and the crystals in her brain were what was causing the seizures. Thing is, we wouldn't have figured it out had she not gone blind. A specialist took a sample from her eye and sent it to Ames Lab. The specialists were sure it was some sort of fungal infection. Results said it was cholesterol. She was started on a lowfat diet and she only eats dog food with less than 10% crude fat in it. Once she was on lowfat food the seizures subsided almost immediately and she hasn't had one in over two years. Don't think it is the same thing but a change in food is an inexpensive guess. We went through the same thing when Ginger was having her seizures and they thought it was a fungal infection. Lots of guesses. Food dye? Allergy? Bacteria? You name it. We spent close to two thousand dollars to find out it was the fat in her food.



  7. #37
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mganzeveld View Post
    My border collie had seizures from time to time and it progressively got worse. Then her pupils completely dilated and she went blind. Spent almost a year and a couple thousand dollars getting down to the bottom of it. Turned out she had a very rare disorder where her system wasn't processing cholesterol properly and it was crystalizing in different areas of her body. The cholesterol crystals destroyed her retinas and the crystals in her brain were what was causing the seizures. Thing is, we wouldn't have figured it out had she not gone blind. A specialist took a sample from her eye and sent it to Ames Lab. The specialists were sure it was some sort of fungal infection. Results said it was cholesterol. She was started on a lowfat diet and she only eats dog food with less than 10% crude fat in it. Once she was on lowfat food the seizures subsided almost immediately and she hasn't had one in over two years. Don't think it is the same thing but a change in food is an inexpensive guess. We went through the same thing when Ginger was having her seizures and they thought it was a fungal infection. Lots of guesses. Food dye? Allergy? Bacteria? You name it. We spent close to two thousand dollars to find out it was the fat in her food.
    How old was she when it started and did you switch foods at that time? Our dog has been on the same food for a long time.



  8. #38
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    Re: Seizures in dogs

    She was about two and a half years old when the seizures started. They were small at first and and happened once a month. Then they slowly happened more frequently. The specialist figured her youth's metabolism masked it until she was older. Best wishes to you. It was a very difficult year to handle and we really questioned our efforts when the bills passed the thousand dollar mark.



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